100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY S, 1953

U

Brown Cites
Dissent Role
F.or Papers
"The American newspaper will
die itsit forfeits its defense of the
"right to be wrong," said Sevellon
Brown, editor and publisher of the
Providence, R. I., Journal-Bulle-
tin, stated in a paper read yes-
terday at the fourth in the jour-
nalism lecture series.
Because bad weather caused the
cancellation of his airplane flight
to Ann Arbor, Brown's talk was
read by Prof. Wesley H. Maurer,
chairman of the journalism de-
partment.,
THE DEFENSE of voicing dis-
senting opinions is not only of
vital importance to a newspaper's
freedom, but is essential for the
American newspaper if it is to
gain the respect and the strength
for assuming its editorial respon-
sibility, rather than the criticism
so greatly feared, Brown said.
He continued by saying that
dissenting opinion needs the
protection of mass consent and
that it is the duty of the press
to play a part in winning this
acceptance.
The essence of Brown's address
lay in Voltaire's famous lines
which he quoted, "I disapprove
of what you say but I will defend
to the death your right to say it."
However the peril which news-
papers and editors find themselves
in today stems from the reader's
misinterpreting the defense of in-
dividual's dissent by a newspaper
as a sign of condonement.
As a result of this "guilt by as-
sociation," Brown pointed out, it
takes courage and character for
newspaper owners, publishers and
editors always to see through in
times of tension and crisis to the
opportunities, the obligations and
the realities of newspaper policy.

Culture Lag
Students who "forget every-
thing" during the Christmas
vacation will understand why
the bill of three speech depart-
ment one-act plays originally
scheduled for today and tomor-
row has been postponed until
next week.
Cast members of the three
original plays by members of
the class of '52 returning from
their wild holiday revels, dis-
covered they needed an extra
week of rehearsals to make up
for what they forgot during the
Yuletide break.
The one acts, free to the pub-
lic, will be presented Friday
and Saturday, Feb. 16 and 17,
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
SL TO Show
M~ovie Based
On Benet Tale
"All That Money Can Buy"
based on Stephen Vincent Be-
net's famous legend of "The Devil
and Daniel Webster," will be the
feature attraction of the SL Cin-
ema Guild this weekend.
The film will be shown at 5:30,
7:15 and 9:10 p.m. tomorrow and
Saturday and at 8 p.m. Sunday
at the Architecture Auditorium
for the admission price of 50 cents.
* * *
THE STORY revolves around
an American Faust, Jabez Stone,
played by James Craig, who has
sold his soul to the devil Mr.
Scratch, portrayed by Walter Hus-
ton, for the benefit of enjoying
years of wealth and luxury.
Seven years later, when the devil
comes around to collect Stone
tries to breach the contract and
prevails upon his friend Daniel
Wedster, Edward Arnold, to plead
his case. This leads to the dra-
matic finale of the film.

Prof. Gabra Discusses
Diggings in Hermoupolis

Culture and life in a 2,000-year-
old Egyptian city was discussed
yesterday by. Cairo University's
Prof. Sami Gabra, who directed 20
years of excavation at the once-
flourishing metropolis of Her-
moupolis West.
'The site of the city is located
about 200 miles south of Cairo,
Egypt, and covers an area of 30
acres, most of which is still un-
excavated.
PROF. GABRA showed slides re-
vealing that the people in this
area once worshipped the Ibis bird,
a genus common around the Nile
basin. From 1931 to 1951, when
Prof. Gabra was in charge of the
excavations, many pictures and
statue-idols of the bird were un-
covered, as well as Ibis mummies.
"The reason that the Ibis
bird may have been chosen as
an object of worship," Prof.
Gabra said, "may have been
that they ate many insects
which might otherwise have de-
stroyed Egyptian crops."
Large subterranean galleries,
similar to the famous Roman cata-
combs have been unearthed at
Hermoupolis West. These galler-

ies contain chambers for worship
and religious meetings. Niches in
the walls contained hundreds of
mummies of the sacred birds.
Hermoupolis flourished as early
as 700 B.C. and, as the animal
cult spread over Egypt and the
Near East, developed into a cos-
mopolitan mecca for worshippers,
according to Prof. Gabra.
Prof. Gabra concluded that the
excavations confirm many ancient
Greek stories and documents
which historians could not pre-
viously rely on as factual,
Boak to Conclude
Jerome Lectures
Prof. Arthur Boak, Richard
Hudson Professor of Ancient His-
tory, will present the last in the
Jerome lecture series on "Man-
power in the Western Roman Em-
pire" 4:15 p.m. today in the West
Conference Rm. of the Rackham
Bldg.
"Government Services" will be
the topic of Prof. Boak's round-
table discussion.

A REVIEW
-A Picture

OF

1952'

Cap-\Is a le

I

'hi

'. I

U U

SALU
MEN'S CLOTHING and FURNISHINGS

ROYAL NURSE-De-
throned King Farouk busies him-,
self with his son and successor,
King Ahmed Fuad HI on Capri i
where he settled in August after
losing Egyptian throne.

W I N N E R A N D W I F E-President-elect Eisenhower and Mamie acknowledge supporters'
cheers on election night in New York as GOP. marks first presidential victory in UA years.

GROUP
TOPCOATS
Values to $50.00
$25 and $39.50
SPORTCOATS
REDUCED
20%
(some more)
ALL OUTER
JACKETS
20 % off

S,
A
V
E

Group (One Pant)
SUITS
Values to $60.00
$35 and $44
ALL
SPORT SHIRTS
20 % off
ALL
ROBES
'/3 off

4

is

.1

SHIRT SALE
cat
jWILD' S
State Street on the Campus

MANY OTHER BARGAINS

All Sales Final

Alterations at Cost

607 E. Liberty - Next to Michigan Theatre

- '1

I

I N C O M I N G AND OUTGOING -With election
over, President Truman and President-elect Eisenhower meet in
White House in November to effect change of administration.;

S P O T L I G H T ON SOLE-Common touch was added
to presidential campaign when Democratic t candidate Stevenson
inadvertently bawed a worn sole to Detroit Labor Day audience,

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY
America's Leading Producer of
Business and Personal Airplanes

has
OPPORTUNITIES
for

AERONAUTICAL
MECHANICAL

ELECTRICAL
ELECTRONICS
INDUSTRIAL

x'

CIVIL

ENGINEERS
with ideas and initiative
for
DEVELOPMENT & DESIGN
of
* Diversified line of light commercial airplanes
* Helicopters
* Military Liaison Aircraft
s Military Jet Aircraft
OPENINGS FOR RECENT GRADUATES INCLUDE:

4

A MAN A G A I N S T TlT HESEA - A mighty drama
unfolds in January as Capt. Kurt Carlsen, circled, battles stormy
Atlantic in vain for his sinking command, the Flying Enterprise.

WAR WITHIN A. WAR - Weapons and personal
effects litter ground in Koje Island's Compound 76 as Red POW's
file past Allied guards after June uprising was crushed.

: ,

w

a

Aerodynamicists
Designers
Structural Specialists

Mathematicians
Physicists
Vibration Analysts

/ 4

WRITE

...::: ::::..:.:::::::::.:::::. ; .:..::::":::: "...........
... . ............................................................. :.: ..:..: . ....:: :.
3 :3<

,
'<.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan