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September 24, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-24

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STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 241

Wilcox Gets
Post in NSA
A t Metn
Leonard Wilcox, former Student
Legislature president, was elected
to a newly-created vice-presidency
of the National Student Associa-
tion by acclamation at the NSA's
August convention at Blooming-
ton.
TIoe new post, one of four vice-
presidencies in the organization,
was created at the request of the
incoming president, Dick Murphy
of the University of North Caroli-
na, who felt that the presidency
as previously constituted imposed
an exorbitant burden on one man.
Murphy accepted the nomina-
tion with the understanding that
a new post of executive veep would
be established, and that Wilcox
would fill it.
Wilcox reluctantly accepted the
nomination, after receiving as-
surance that a graduate fellowship
he had won in the University In-
stitute of Public Administration
would still be available in fall,
1953.
The well-known ex-SL leader
will operate out of NSA head-
quarters in Philadelphia.
The Michigan delegation of 20
also was awarded the Human Re-
latiois Sub-Commission, which
will be handled by SL. It will col-
lect and dispense information and
assistance in the discrimination
field.
Michigan will also be host to
the Finance Sub-Commission for
the coming year, with SL vice-
president Phil Berry and Treas-
urer Bob Neary attempting to solve
the . NSA's chronic monetary dif-
ficulties.
Free Weekly
Movie Series
Starts Friday

THE CITY BEAT

--- '-- --- - - -
-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
NICE WORK-Hardly a cap and gown pose, but nice work for
the photographer, Jack Bergstrom. Jack is one of two photog-
raphers taking pictures for the.1953 'Ensian. Appointments can
still be made from 2 to 5 p.m. daily at the Student Publications
Bldg.
A nn A rbor, Mayor Brown
Spend Hectic Last Month
RR T O a OTT'4,R

In the largest primary election
in the history of Ann Arbor, Aug-
ust 3, voters turned down a re-
vised charter amendment that
would have given the city power
to levy a 10 per cent excise tax
on entertainment.
The amendment rejected in
the primary was a revision of
a similar amendment defeated
in the April 7 election. While
Mayor William 0. Brown, jr.
denied at the time that a third
attempt would be made to pass
the measure, Alderman Arthur
D. Moore renewed his plea for
an amendment that "would be
more palatable to the voters."

A series of weekly free movies,
co-sponsored by the University
Museums and the Audio-Visual
Center, has been announced.
The movies will be presented at
7:30 p.m. every Friday in Kellogg
Auditorium. They are:
Oct. 3--"Life Along the Water-
ways," "The Frog" and "The Snap-
ping Turtle."
Oct. 10 -"City of Wax,"
"Pond Insects" and "The Mos-
quito."
Oct. 17-"Glimpse of the Past"
and "Hunting Animals of the
Past.''
Oct. 24-"From Flower to Fruit,"
"Seed Dispersal" and "Plant
Traps."
Oct. 31-"How Indians Build
Canoes," "Apache Indians" and
"Hopi Indians."
Nov. 7-"Louis Pasteur, Man of
Science." t
Nov. 14-"Strands Grow" and
"Strand Breaks."
Nov. 21-"Adventures of Willie
the Skunk," "Two Little Rae.
oons" and "Curious Coati."
Nov. 28-"Fish Is Food," "The
Sunfish" and "Trout Factory."
Dec. 5--"Tiny Water Animals,"
"Amoeba and Vorticella" and
"Hydra."

HIeeting of M'
Section Slated
An important instruction meet-
ing for all students holding Wol-
verine Club Block 'M' section seats
at football games this year will be
held at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium.
Because of sorority rushing and
an IFC meeting the instructions
will only last for fifteen minutes.
Dorothy Fink, '55, chairman of
the Block 'M' section, urges all
people to be prompt so those who
must leave early will receive all
necessary information.
Following the instruction period
a colored film of the block Illinois
section in action will be shown.
This year 1600 students are taking
part in the program which will be
shown during three games.

Mayor Brown had strongly urg-
ed the measure as necessary to
meet future city expenses.
* * *
POLIO HIT Ann Arbor hard
this summer as the Washtenaw
County polio list topped 26 near
the season's end. Children felt the
seriousness of the epidemic with
closing of the Burns Park pool and
the lack of space and facilities in
local hospitals.
The Ann Arbor parking situa-
tion received another boost
when the city council following
a suggestion by Mayor Brown,
approved purchase of the so
called "Moose" property at
Packard and Main for $75,000
at 'heir August 18 meeting. The
site will provide additional park-
ing space in the downtown area.
At that time Mayor Brown also
expressed his hope that plans can
be drawn up and construction
completed on a proposed parking
structure to be erected on the
Maynard St. parking lot by Octo-
ber, 1953.
** * * .
THE ANN ARBOR mayor also
trecked to Detroit and secured the
approval of the Detroit common
council for several of his parking
suggestions.
From the Sheriff's office came
reports of two attempted escapes
and one successful one daring the
summer months.
In the most recent attempt on
Sept. 11 one of the escapees was
retaken after breaking his arim
while .leaving the building. The
other was apprehended in Detroit
September 15.

A special meeting of the Ann
Arbor City Council will be held
at 7:30 p.m. today in the Council
Chambers of City Hall to discuss
the proposed annexation of the
North Campus area, the University
Golf Course, the Botanical Gar-
dens and the former Inglis prop-i
erty.
The annexations seemed destin-
ed to get council approval with-
out controversy until the Sept. 15
council meeting when Mayor Wil-
'U' Eligibility
For Students ,
Interpreted
University eligibility rules at
present permit any regularly en-
rolled student who is not on aca-
demic discipline to participate in
activities according to his choice,l
the Office of Student Affairs em-
phasized yesterday.
Stressing the main points of the
eligiblity rules which appear in
full in today's Daily Official Bul-
letin (see page 2), the office out-
lined the duties of student mem-
bers and directors of organiza-
tions under the rules' jurisdiction.
Any student on academic disci-
pline must make it his personall
responsibility to keep out of Or+
resign from listed activities, ac-
cording to the Student AffairsI
Office. Academic discipline in-
cludes cases of probation, special
probation, warning, notification
and action pending on scholasticI
matters.
Further rulings provide that
any student in one of the above
positions who is enrolled in a
club membership must notify
his chairman of his resignation
and submit a written statement
that he has done so to the Of-
fice of StudentrAffairs not lat-
er than October 3.
Chairmen and managers of ac-
tivities are asked to submit a list
of members to the office. While
the heads of activities are not re-
quired to check members' eligi-
bility status, student affairs offi-
cials request that they identify
the activity as falling within the
eligiblity rules for the benefit of
participants.
Orchestra Open
To New Students
Students who are interested in
joining the University Symphony
Orchestra may obtain more infor-
mation by contacting Conductor
Wayne Dunlap in Rm. 704, Burton
Tower.
The 105 piece orchestra, spon-
sored by the music school, especial-
ly needs strings. It is open to any
student and can be taken with or
without credit.
Best masterpieces of symphonic
literature are played in the organ-
ization, which has been in con-
tinuous operation since 1887.
It was begun as an accompany-
ing orcestra for the University
Musical Society and was former-
ly conducted by Thor Johnson,
now conductor of the Cincinnati
Symphony.

liam E. Brown, jr., and Alderman
Lawrence H. Ouimet lead an op-
position move, calling the project
"unreasonable."
* * *
IN A SURPRISE move Monday
20 members of the Washtenaw
County Fair Society voted to sell
the Fairgrounds to Washtenaw
county rather than to the city of
Ann Arbor.
Although officials of the so-
ciety have agreed to sell the fair-
grounds to the city, Edward F.
Conlin, representing the opposi-
tion, said the present arrange-
ments fail to serve rural areas.
A showdown inside the society
may come on Nov. 12 at the group's
annual meeting.
PLEDGES OF increased finan-
cial support at a meeting of the
Ann Arbor Chamber of Commerce
spearheaded a new program of ex-
pansion for the tottering 33 year
old organization at a meeting on
Monday night.
Chamber President Albert E.
Blashfield outlined a five point
program recommended by the
executive committee designed to
revitalize the group and aid it
in its struggle for survival.
A State survey partyl is work-
ing in the Ann Arbor area to es-
tablish a definite route for the
proposed beltline highway north
of the city, Charles M. Zielger of
the State Highway Commission re-
ported yesterday.
Included in the project is a plan
for Plymouth Rd. (US 12) to by-
pass Ann Arbor on the northern
rim and link with Jackson Rd. just
west of the city limits.

A

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