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September 17, 1952 - Image 13

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-17

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PAGE THREE

DNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17.1952
J Operates
4.000 Watt?

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

..... ..,r w . ..... _a . . _ _ . . ....._

An Idle Conversation in the Arboretum

ENERGY FOR PEACETIME:
Phoenix Project Probes Atom

I Station

WUOM Presents
Major Concerts
One of the University's out-
standing public-service programs
Is the operation of a 44,000 watt,
University-owned FM radio sta-
tion with transmitter tower at1
Peach Mountain outside Ann Ar-
bor.
The purpose of the University
of Michigah Broadcasting Service,
organized in 1925, is to provide
programs designed in the public
interest.
* a *
MANY OF ITS programs are re-
corded and rebroadcast through-j
out Michigan. During the last year
letters from listeners indicated
that WUOM programs were be-
ing heard in 155 Michigan cities
and towns.
WUOM regularly schedules in-
formative programs made avail-
able by various nations and in-
ternational organizations.
In addition to broadcasting all
major concerts by University mu-
sical organizations such as the
Band, Glee Clubs, Choir, Sym-
phony, Little Symphony, antStan-
ley Quartet, the station has also
presented broadcasts of three Gil-
bert and Sullivan Operas, "The
Messiah," and the complete Un-
ion Opera. Listening is pure pleas-
ure, as WUOM carries no com-
mercial announcements.
SPEECH DEPARTMENT pro-
grams regularly broadcastyover
'WUOM and then relayed to
WHRV and other Michigan sta-
tions include Anell Hall Play-
house,, Radio Workshop drama
series, and Down Storybook Lane,
a children's program presented
five days per week.
For television there is a coaxial
cable from Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre in the League to the top
of Burton Tower where a relay
transmitter may be installed to
send programs to Detroit TV
transmitters. Preparations are now
being made to occupy what was
formerly the Dolph Funeral Home
In Ann Arbor for, a television
studio.
MVen's Glee
Club Oldest,
Bans est at 'U'
The oldest musical organization
on campus, the Men's Glee Club,
is also one of the busiest groups
at the University.
Last year the club made ten
out-of-state trips, traveling 4,500
miles, and presenting over 30 con-
certs. The high point of the sea-
son was a 2,000 mile eastern tIur
which included concerts in New
York, Philadelphia, Washington,
Pittsburgh and Cleveland.
FIRST ON ITS crowded calen-
dar for the coming year will be
the joint concert with the Glee
Club of Cornell University on the
night of the Cornell-Michigan
football -game Nov. 8.
The Glee Club is also planning
an extensive tour through the
mid-west between semesters and
another eastern trip during the
spring vacation where they will
appear on Ed Sullivan's coast-
to-coast television show, "Toast
of the Town."
A student managed, self -per-
petuating organization, the Club is
under the direction of Prof. Philip
Duey of the Music School who
came to the University after a
distinguished career as a profes-
sional singer.

All men who like to sing can
attend one of the tryout sessions
held every evening during the first
week of classes in Rm. 3-G of the
Michigan Union.

It was nearly six years ago that
the Student Legislature went on
record as favoring a "functional
war memorial to the World War
II dead, thus laying the seed for
the Phoenix Memorial Research
Project.
In the wake of the war, the
Project was conceived as a living
tribute to its heroes, dedicated to
the study of peace-time potentials
and implications of atomic en-
ergy.
The Phoenix name comes from
the Phoenix bird of ancient Egyp-
tian mythology which was said to
fly into the flames of its altar
every 549 years, there to be con-
sumed acid then to rise again, re-
newed and rejuvenated from the
ashes.
a a *
IT WAS almost nine months
after the initial SL resolution was
passed before the memorial idea
was given official sanction. Then,
in' September, 1947 the University
Regents named a faculty-student
War Memorial Committee.
A month later they had adopt-
ed the suggestion of prominent
alumnus Fred J. Smith, a New
York publisher who proposed
the research be devoted to the
study of atomic potential in the
realm of peaceful activity.
By May of 1948 the inevitable

Washington red tape had been
cut, and with final Regents' ap-
proval, the road was cleared for
the Project's emergence.
* a * .
PHOENIX head, Dean Ralph.A.
Sawyer, of the graduate school,
and his staff began in 1949 on a
borrowed operating budget of
$25,000. In that year Phoenix
granted a total of $6,400 to in-
dividual researchers to explore
various atomic areas.
Since that time, however, the
operating budget has jumped
more than $100,000 with last
year's individual research grants
totaling $72,000.
This has come about with the
aid of an immense general fund
campaign, the first in University
history, held in 1950 and 1951
which has raised to date approx-
imately six million dollars.
About one o one and a half
million dollars of this money will
be used to build a memorial lab-
oratory building on the Univer-
sity's new North Campus,
The new structure 'will house
the University's two large "atom
busting" machines and biological
research activities that use ra-
diation too powerful to be per-
sued in campus buildings.
* a a
ONE AND A half million dol-

lars of Phoenix funds has come
from the General Motors Cgrpora-
tion to support an Institute of In-
dustrial Health for the study of
present-day health problems in
industry.
Phoenix Project money is also
supporting isotope research in
five different colleges and one
research institute and through
one large, in'terdepartmental re-
search project on plant growth.
With the help of the fund of
over $100,000 contributed in mem-
ory of Dean Alice Crocker Lloyd,
the Project is about to enter the
cancer research field.
This may perhaps be brought
about by providing space for an
Atomic Energy Commission pro-
ject concerned with a compari-
tive study of artificial radio-
active sources of radiation and
X-rays in cancer treatment.
The Project has also been car-
rying on a vast program in the
field of social sciences. Work along
this line included the past sum-
mer's Institute for the study of
the legal aspects of atomic energy
and as a grant to the University's
Institute of Public Administration
the study of the operation of the
AEC in contract relations, labor
policies and other governmental
activities.

11

ROLLING HILLS-Spacious, University owned Nichols Arboretum' is one of the favorite student spots for a sunburn, a long walk, or an
evening around a campfire. Close to campus, the "Arb" is the scene of much idle frolic, and the object of much stale humor. The land
in the upper left hand corner is the scene of the University's new north campus to be completed in the year 2000.

P/o

11.

Students Live in Dorms, Co-o ps, Homes

Most University men park their
golf bags and hang their hats in
dormitory residence halls or frater-
nity houses during their four year
struggle with higher education.
But others live in student Co-
operative houses, local rooming
houses, or self-maintained apart-
ments.
DORMITORIES get the first
call because of the University rul-
ing that all freshmen must spend
one year in the Residence Halls.
The Michigan House Plan in
the dorms meets the social, fra-
ternal and athletic needs so well
that many men never move out.
Fifteen per cent of the stu-
dent body however, soon affiliate
with fraternities' through their
formal rushing periods.
Always a strong force 4n stu-
dent affairs on campus, the fra-
ternities are under the central
direction of the Inter-Fraternity
Council made up of members
from each house.
Social, activities are mixed with
acedcemic chores to provide a re
laxed tension that appeals to
many men.
FOR INEXPENSIVE living in a
close atmosphere of camaderie,
Student Co-operative offer the
best financial bargain. Room and
board 'in the six co-operative
houses averages $170 a semester,
just half the dormitory expenses.
Each member is expected to
work about five hours a week,
either planning, buying, or cook-
ing meals, washing dishes,
cleaning or stoking the furnace.

F
F

Co-op also carry out a full cal-
der of social activities throughout
the school year.
Other students choose to take a
room in one of the many Univer-

sity approved rooming houses
scattered throughout Ann Arbor.
In order to live in an apartment,
single students are required to ob-
tain speciaL permission from the
office of Student Affairs.

-
Welcome - Fros
our collegiate haid styles
will put you in the groove.
Try us!
The Dascola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theater

.r

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
HowardFFarrar, Choir Director
Phyllis Farrar, Organist
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. 'Nursery for
children during the service.
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Center; 438 Maynard St., Phone 5838
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Williams, Associate
Tuesday: Student Tea: 4:30 to 6 P.M., Guild
House
Friday, September 21: Newcomers Dinner for New
Students. First Congregational Church, State
and William Sts. 6:00 P.M.
Sunday, September 24, 6:00 P.M.: Student supper
and program, First Congregational Church.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
State and, E. William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister
Harold Haugh, Choir Director
Howard Chase, Organist
Sunday, September 23
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
during service.

CHURCH

Church School

Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Center, 438 Maynard St., Phone 5838
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Williams, Associate
Tuesday: Student Tea: 4:30 to 6 P.M., Guild
House
Friday, September 21: Newcomers Dinner-for New
Students. First Congregational Church, State
and William Sts. 6:00 P.M.
Sunday, September 24, 6:00 P.M.: Student supper
and program, First Congregational Church.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor & Student Counselor
Mrs. Monica McGregor, Asst. Student Counselor
Friday, Sept. 19th
6:00-Freshman Dinner and Party.
Call Church office for reservations.
Sunday, Sept. 21st
9:45-Church School. Student Class in Guild
House, 502 East Huron.
11:00-Church Worship.
6:00-Roger Williams Guild. Student Discussion
in Guild House.
Wednesday, Sept. 24th-6:00 P.M.: Church Fam-
ily Dinner with Students as Guests.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson St.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M.; 8:00 A.M.; 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M.; 9:30 A.M.; 11:00 A.M.;
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in basement of chapel.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Service at 10:30 A.M.
Sundays at 5:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, supper-program.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Washtenaw near South University Ph. 2-4466
Westminster Guild, the Presbyterian student group,
welcomes freshmen to join its activities.
Friday night, Sept. 19, Freshman Welcome Party.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Div'ision St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
Wednesday, September 17
7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion followed by student
breakfast.
Friday, September 19
4,00-6:00 P.M.: Tea and Open House.
6:00 P.M.: Supper for Freshmen and. Transfer
Students at Parish House. Meet at Canterbury
House, 218 N. Division.
Sunday, September 21
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion followed by Student
Breakfast.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: 'Sunday Service.
6:15 P.M:: Student Guild Meeting.
Friday, Orientation Week, there will be a supper
for new students.
GRACE. BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Friday, September 19
7:00-10:00 P.M.: Student Open House at Grace
Bible Church.
Sunday, September 21
10:00A.M.: University Bible Cfass at Grace Bible
Church.
11:00 A.M.: Church Service.
6:15 P.M.: Grace Bible Church Guild (Cost Sup-
per served at the Church).
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Ave..
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
Phone 7622
Friday Evening, September 19th
7:00 P.M.: Open House for all New Students-
Refreshments.
Sunday, September 21st
8:30-9:-10 A.M.: Breakfast at the Center.
9:20-10:10 A.M.: Bible Study at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Church Worship Service.
Trinity Lutherdn-Corner of Fifth Ave, and
William St.
Zion Lutheran-Corner of E. Washington at
S. Fifth Ave.
7:00 P.M.: Lutheran Student Association Meet-
ing at the Center. Professor Gerhard Lenski of
the Sociology Dept. will be the speaker.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
Sunday, 10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and program.
Wednesdays 4:00-5:30 P.M.: Do drop in teas.
Fridays 8:00 P.M.: Party or recreation.
September 19th of Orientation Week, supper and
open House for freshmen.
Reservations, Phone 6881.

m

WHENEVER YOU THINK OF TRAVEL
THINK OF
&'eoliT1a 94'seI £e1'dice
OFFICIALLY APPOINTED
BY ALL
TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES
BOTH AT HOME AND ABROAD

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9.10 A .. udv col

0

I

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