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December 18, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'PAGE SRP

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1952

GM Expert
Expects Auto
Innovations
An automotive expert assured
University freshmen engineering
students yesterday that there is
still a great deal to be done in his
field.
T. A. Boyd, a chemical engineer
in the General Motors Research
Laboratories, told the freshmen at
two assembly sessions that he is
"confident that the men of your
* * *

NO BOLTS FOR PATIENTS:
School Serves Hospitalized Children

3,000 YOUNGSTERS:

IFC

Throws a

Party

*

*

*

THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL played host to 3,000 Ann
Arbor youngsters Saturday at its biggest and noisiest party of
the year.
The annual Christmas party got off to its hectic start at 1 p.m.
when the children descended in droves upon 39 houses for one and
a half hours of fraternity-supplied diversion.
No sooner had their parents de-
parted than the exhuberant juve-
niles began to explore the houses
-occasionally tossing snowballs in
the guest rooms or ganging up on
such football notables as Don Dug-
ger, '53BAd. However, in most
cases the planned activities of
harried fraternity men and their
sorority girl friends turned the
afternoon into one of organized
games, singing and ice cream and
cake.
At 2:30 p.m. the children,
who ranged from kindergarten-
ers to sixth graders, were escort-
ed to Hill Auditorium for the
IFC festivities.
Amidst the popping of balloons
and the crunching of candy, Dick
Smith, '53BAd, went through his
baton-twirling routine complete
with a few lessons and his famous
high-stepping march. "I'M .FULL"
Others on the program included
magician sChuck Reynolds, '54,
who managed to present a veryA D L
surprised eight-year old with a A DAILY
live rabbit, the Novelaires, emcee -O -
Sherburne Brown, '54, and, of
course, Santa Claus. FEATURE
After the show each house gath-
ered its charges around a sign
bearing the fraternity's name to Story by
enable parents to meet their chil-
dren outside the Auditorium with MIKE WOLFF
a minimum of confusion. By 4:30
p.m. most of the youngsters had Pjctures by
been called for. There were no
reports of lost children during thei AL RE I D
afternoon's migration.

f I

-Daily-Alan Reid
TWO 'U' HOSPITAL PATIENTS STUDY BOOKKEEPING AND TYPING

T. A. BOYD
". . auto progress"
generation are going to advance
the automobile a great deal fur-
ther beyond what it is now.
"I would like to be around 20
years from now to drive your 1973
model-and drive it on the greatly
improved highways you will have
by that time."
BOYD, WHO illustrated his talk
with slides depicting several facets
of GM plant activities, said that
it was difficult to predict just what
automotive improvements will be
made in the future.
However, he said he could en-
visage still better and lighter en-
gines, lighter cars and built with
inexpensive steel that would not
rust.
Boyd collaborated with Charles
F. Kettering and the late Thomas
Midgley Jr. in the discovery of
tetraethyl lead as an antiknock
compound for automotive and avi-

* *. *
By JOYCE FICKIES
School-age children confined to
the University Hospital need not
pass up their reading, writing and
arithmetic.
Patients are able to keep up on
their lessons through the services
of the Hospital School, which has
served their educational and re-
creational needs for 25 years.
- ** *
SEPARATED INTO nursery,
early elementary, later elementary
Musieal Confab
Set for January
The eighth annual Midwestern
Conference on School Vocal and
Instrumental Music will be held
Jan. 9 and 10 here Orien Dalley,
music director of the University
Broadcasting Service and confer-
ence chairman, announced yester-
day.
An enrollment of at least 1,500,
including music teachers and stu-
dents from state high schools and
University faculty and students, is

and secondary levels, the school is
staffed with 15 teachers, 13 of
them working full time.
Each member of the staff,
which includes a director and
an assistant director, has done
work in the field of special edu-
cation in college. In addition,
seven University School of Edu-
cation practice teachers put in
eight hours apiece each week.
Physical plant of the school in-
cludes the ninth floor elementary

presented," she explained. "We
must try to give each patient the
feeling of-being in the group with-
out actually being physically. a
part of it."
She also pointed out that many'
students are educationally retard-
ed because of long illnesses. How-
ever, the change in medicine has
made some difference during past
years in teaching. Since discovery
of the various "wonder drugs" pa-
tients have, as a rule, been con-
-mar to ha hanial fr Oirft

* * 4> * * *

staff facilities and the rooms of iJnea'tothe ┬▒iUal for snorter
lengths of time.
the secondary staff in a wing of Called by several visiting educa-
the eighth floor. There are also trslestbyumera"ingteduca-
two classrooms in the Neuropsy- tors last summer "one of the best
chiatric Institute, in the nation," the school is help-
Oher patsu of the hospital ing to lead in a new movement to-
where teachers go to provide bed- ward promoting the education of
side teaching are the polio res- the hospitalized child.
piratory center, the contagious Mrs. Walton is chairman of
hospital, and any other ward committee for International Coun-
where children of school age may cil for Exceptional Chiiddren, a
part of this movement.

"WE WANT DICK SMITH!"

ation fuels. expected.
-s es
for a
MERRY CHRISTMAS
and a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
2/4 NCVAN BUlEN E S
8 NICKELS ARCADE PHONE 2-2914

be.
* * *
THE USUAL headaches of a
school teacher are sometimes mag-
nified in the hospital because of
the nature of the students.
Biggest problem, according to
school director Mildred H. Wal-
ton, is in grouping the pupils.
"It isn't always possible to get
,the child in groups because of the
different educational levels re-
Frisinger, Koken
Seek City Posts
Max R. Frisinger, Ann Arbor
contractor, yesterday announced
his intention to seek the City
Council presidency on the Demo-
cratic ticket.
Should his Republican opponent
George Wahr Sallade remain the
only GOP candidate for the office
by the time of the Feb. 1 primary
the two men will face each other
in the April elections.
Meanwhile the announcement of
Paul Koken, Ann Arbor attorney,
that he would run for the Second
Ward Council seat on the Republi-
can ticket yesterday, made it de-
finite that there would be at least
one primary election contest on
the Feb. 16 ballot. He will oppose
Republican incumbent Ald. Clare
H. Fenn.

Fair Society
Dispute
Comes to Halt
The dispute over voting privi-
leges of life members of the Wash-
tenaw County Fair Society appears
to have reached a temporary stale-
mate.
In a second hearing on the dis-
pute attorneys for the two con-
tending groups reached no solu-
tion other than to agree to sub-
mit a "stipulated set of facts" so
that Circuit Judge James R.
Breakey, Jr., may rule on the ques-
tion.
ACCORDING TO Arthur Carpen-
ter, attorney for the life members,
a ruling based on the state statute
governing voting privileges in such
organizations and precedent es-
tablished by similar cases is -hop-
ed for by tomorrow.
This would enable the society
to go ahead with its annual
meeting which had been post-
poned to Dec. 23.
Chief item on the agenda of this
year's meeting which had been
originally scheduled for Nov. 12,
is the sale of the society's fair-
grounds tract on the western edge
of the city.
The dispute over voting 'privi-
leges of the so-called life mem-
bers arose when it became known
that a group of them opposed sell-
ing the property to the city as
proposed by the organization's of-
ficers.
PURCHASE
CAMERA SHOP

r

"WHAT'S YOUR NAME?"

"YES, YOU CAN HAVE MORE"

Midst the mnany greetings of the season, we wish
to join this overworked gentleman in wishing
you all the best Christinas and the Happiest
Holiday vacation ever.
We of the
ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
South Forest - Just off South U.
* Christmas Greetings
o*'to all our friends
00 0

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,A

Come

--"--'t

"CAKE TOO?"

"AND THEN THE LION CAME OUT OF THE WOODS"

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