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December 12, 1952 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-12

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1952

U I I

mlm

FIFTEEN NAMED:
SQ Quadrants Pick Charter Members
. . . *

U' Polio'Amni' Return
For Ho meco ming-lDay

By BOB JAFFE
Eleven student members and
four honorary members were elect-
ed last night to the charter group
of the South Quadrangle chapter
of the Quadrants, Quad honor so-
ciety.
The three-year-old Quadrant
came into existence as the result
' of a desire to award Quad resi-
dents who had made some major
cultural, educational or social con-
tribution. The criterion for mem-
bership is "an outstanding con-
tribution to the Quadrangle com-
munity, both House and Quad."
* * *
THE ORGANIZATION, devel-
oped by a committee led by George
Roumell, former president of
Michigan House, West Quad Coun-
cil and Student Legislature, at-
tempts to stress the universal
character of the residential com-
munity.
The awards went to Ronald C.
Bornstein, '54; YvanE. Brabant,
'55E; Allan R. McGregor, '53Ed;
Roscoe G. Parker, '53BAd; Dan J.
Peterson, '57A; Clyde A. Rowley,
'53L, Curtis Sheffield, '53 and
Charles E. Weber, '53.
Three students who graduated
from the University last year,
before the South Quad was or-
ganized, were given awards for
their outstanding service to the
Quad while in school. They are
Felice V. Agnifilo, Oliver J. Popa
and Alan R. Warshawsky.
Honorary members named were
President Harlan H. Hatcher; Rob-
ert Harrison, from Club 600; Peter
A. Ostafin, Assistant Dean of Men
and Resident Director, and Lea
Vogel, Business Manager of the
South Quad.

--Daily-Aian Reid
AWARD-Assistant to the Dean of Students Peter A. Ostafin,
Resident Director of the South Quad, presents the insignia of the
Quadrants to Charles E. Weber, Grad., president of South Quad.
H~usic Students To Present
Four Major Opera Scenes
e 4

Scenes from four major operas
will come to life at 8:30 p.m. today
when students in the Opera Work-
shop present their first program
of the year in Angell Hall Audi-
torium A.
The performance will include
scenes from Verdi's "Rigoletto,"
Beethoven's "Fidelio," "Carmen"
by Bizet and "Pagliacci," by Leon-
cavallo.

* STAR-CLEANERS
1213 S. University
DRY CLEANING SPECIALS
FOR THE PRICE OF
Save $1.00 on Every
$3 of Cleaning
2-HOUR CLEANING AT REGULAR PRICE

The Opera Workshop, added to
the curriculum of the School of
Music last summer, is an advanced
opera class for voice majors, lead-
ing to a degree in opera. The opera
work done previously in music
school consisted of an opera put
on each year with the Speech De-
partment.
The program will be givenwith-
out scenery or costumes and will
be open to the public.
Cinema Guild
To Present
Two Features
Two attractions, "The Magic
Horse" and "Nanook of the North,"
will highlight the weekend's Stu-
dent Legislature Cinema Guild
program with complete showings
beginning at 6, 7, and 9 p.m. today
and tomorrow and at 8 p.m. Sun-
day at the Architecture Auditor-
ium.
Based on one of the favorite
"shazki" or Russian folk tales,
"The Magic Horse" has its source
in the primitive nature myths of
ancient Russia.
The feature length cartoon,
with English dialogue, is the
simple but winning tale of a little
boy and his tiny horse with mag-
ical powers.
In contrast, the second film,
"Nanook of the North," portrays
the grim struggle for survival
against nature which the Eskimo
Nanook and his family must un-
dergo. As a musical innovation,
original Eskimo songs have been
used as the theme for the back-
ground music.
Blum To Lecture
Prof. Harold F. Blum of the zool-
ogy department of Princeton Uni-
versity will deliver a lecture en-
titled "Time's Arrow and Man"
under the auspices of the zoology
department at 4:15 today in Rack-
ham Amphitheater.

By JOYCE FICKIES
Yesterday was homecoming day
at the University Hospital polio
respiratory center.
The twelve center "alumni" plus
an estimated 200 other visitors
crowded the gaily-decorated ward
Law Students
Debate Cases
In Mock Court
Sixteen Law School juniors
went up before a mock court last
night in the quarter finals of the
Henry M. Campbell competition
to argue whether or not theater
owners can televise football games
without the football company's
permission.
The group was selected on the
basis of performances in the Case
Clubs. They were paired off in
teams to present their arguments
before four courts of Law School
faculty members.
The winning teams consisted of:
Donn Miller and Theodore St. An-
toine, Dave Belin and Hugh Har-
ness, William Parmuter and Wil-
liam Vobach, William Luney and
Ray Trombadorie.
All the triumphant teams rep-
resented the theater owners. How-
ever, this cannot be taken as a
trend since the cases are judged
on participants' performances and
not on the law.
Daily Holds
iHovie Contest
What was the best movie of
1952?
And who were the best actors
and actresses?
A pair of tickets to either the
Michigan or State theaters will be
awarded each of the 25 Daily
readers whose answers to these
questions most nearly match those
of newspaper movie editors
throughout the nation.
The movie editors will be vot-
ing in an Associated Press poll,
results will be announced in Jan-
uary.
In the event of ties, entries with
the earliest postmark will get the
awards. Each reader may enter
only once. Names of the winning
25 will appear in The Daily.
To register your preference and
enter the competition, just clip
and complete the form below, or
a reasonable fascimile, and mail
to The Michigan Daily, 420 May-
nard, Ann Arbor.

for a party with a double purpose
-a "going home" celebration for
three patients, and a reunion of
all those who have ever been con-
fined in the center.
* * *
THE PARTY was originally
scheduled only as a sendoff for
the three who will leave today.
However, since former patients
return to the ward periodically
for checkups, doctors have.tried
to schedule them for days when
celebrations of this sort occur.
Main guest of honor was Dicky
Brink, the 10-year-old patient who
has been best known locally for
his interest in sports.
TWO MEMBERS of the Wolver-
ine football team were on hand
to say goodbye to Dicky. Merritt
Green, '53, 1952 team captain, and
Ted Kress, '54E, star back, sang
Christmas carols and chatted with
the slight patient.
Two other patients shared the
limelight with Dicky.
One is Ann Wehner, a victim of
both bulbar and spinal polio. She
has been confined to an iron lung
ever since she was stricken with
the crippling disease in August,
1951.
The other is Neal York, who
will be taken today to a hospital in
Lebanon, O. He will stay there
until his parents' new home is
completed.
YORK, LIKE Dicky and Mrs.
Wehner, was brought to the cen-
ter for the specialized respiratory
treatment given there. The pur-
pose of the center is to get the
seriously-ill patients out of iron
lungs and into chest respirators
and rocking beds, both newer and
less cumbersome breathing devices.
Opened 15 months ago, the res-
piratory center, one of the finest
in the nation, is supported by the
National Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis.
Two UV Students
Injured in Crash
Two University students, John
A. Renner, '54A, and Harold L.
Jenkins, '56A, were slightly in-
jured in an automobile accident
yesterday when their car crashed
into a tree at Washington St. and
Fletcher St.
Both men were taken to Health
Service where they were treated
for lacerations and bruises. Ren-
ner suffered several broken toes
in the accident.
University officials said that
Renner was operating the car
without permission which consti-
tuted a violation of the Univer-
sity's auto regulations.

SL To Teach
Leadership
Techniques
In order to give members of
Student Legislature and the Ad-'
ministrative Wing a specific back-
ground in student government and
provide them with leadership tech-
niques, SL is launching a new
leadership training program.
The program will be conducted
at three levels. The first will in-
clude SL members, the Admin-
istrative Wing and prospective
candidates. The second will be
aimed specifically at committee
chairmen and potential chairmen,
while the third will be at the cab-
inet level.
* * *
THE FIRST session at the gen-
eral member level will meet at 3:15
p.m. Tuesday at the St Bldg. to
discuss the committee area with
special emphasis on the Campus{
Action and Public Relations com-
mittees.
The -committee area, however,;
is only one of the many broad
fields which will be covered in
the continuous program. Other
topics to be reviewed include
group leadership, the organiza-
tion and structure of SL, past
and present projects and legis-
lation and administrative tech-
nique.
Within these broad areas speci-
fic courses have been set up which
are graduated to the different
levels.
SENIOR MEMBERS of the leg-
islature will conduct the majority
of the courses with faculty mem-
bers brought in from time to time
to discuss the more technical areas
such as cabinet relations and group
techniques.
Some of the advanced sessions
will be conducted in the form of a
critical analysis, in which the
group will review its faults and
formulate plans for improvement.
At the present time, the courses
are designed particularly for those
who want to work with the legis-
lature. If the experiment proves
successful, chairman Keith Beers,
Grad., hopes to extend it to a
campus wide level.
Union-WA A Skit
Night Entries Due
House groups that wish to par-
ticipate in the Union-WAA Skit
Night should submit their entries
to the Union student offices on or
before Wednesday Harold Abrams,
'54, announced yesterday.
Scenarios for the 1953 show
should be in by Jan. 12.
At a recent Skit Night commit-
tee meeting it was decided that
house bands may furnish musical
background but the skits are not
limited to musicals.
All participants, Abrams said,
must be affiliated with the groups
entering the show.

Christmas dance open to the en-
tire campus. Refreshments will be
served and there is no charge for
admission.
Intermission entertainment will
be presented by various groups of
foreign students and emceed by
Bernie Gelbar, '54.
Japanese a n d Yugoslavian
groups are scheduled to present
several dance numbers and Ukran-
ian, Indian and Chinese students
will entertain with songs and in-
strumental solos.

Friedman Notes Change
In Monetary Economics
Modern monetary policies have embodies both the classical and
been experiencing a real counter- Keynesian economic theories, andv
revolution, according to Prof. Mil- yet differs from either of them.
ton Friedman of the University Prof. Friedman cited Keynes'
of Chicago.
basic achievement as establishing
At a meeting of the Economics the possibility of an under-em-
Club yesterday, Prof. Friedman ployment equilibrium. "Although
said that this counter-revolution Keynes personally believed in a
political laissez-faire state," he
claimed, "one of the reasons for
roret n Fete' the wide and rapid spread of Key-
nesian theories was the popular
belief. in greater governmental
planning."
"Because unreconstructed Key-
Native Diances nesians could not account for the
lack of a depression following
World War II," the Chicago Uni-
The Intercooperative Council versity professor asserted, "mod-
will sponsor a dance, "Foreign ern economists have been forced
Fete," from 8 p.m. to midnight to- to try to find a new theory which
morrow on the second floor of would apply in all economic situa-
Lane Hall. tions, both inflations and depres-
"Foreign Fete" is an annual sions."

r

Pakistan Group
To Show Films
The Pakistan Student Associa-
tion will show two documentary
films about Pakistan at 8 p.m. to-
day at the International Center.
Prof. N. Marbury Efimenco of
the political science department,
will preside at the function which
will be open .to the public.

NOTHING TO DO
SATURDAY NIGHT?
UNION FORMAL
9-1 DECEMBER 13 $1.50
PIP nru InaJ !reethnqi
TO
FRIENDS & PATRONS 4
We will be open from 7 A.M. to 7 P.M. through
the holidays except Dec. 24, 25, and 28 and January 1.
)4
DINNER BELTS
808 South State

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Can
YOU THINK OF A
MORE ENJOYABLE
EVENING
THAN DINING OUT?
* . . especially when you eat at
Weber's where the ability to pre-
pare food to your liking is not a
coincidence but an attainment.
PAUL THOMPKINS
at the Hammond
Every Sunday

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-------------------------------------,
To II
To The Editor: I
Michigan Daily I
420 Maynard I
Ann Arbor, Mich. I
I I
Ifyou ask me
B R sI
1 1$
IBest Movie Released in 1952 was:

.

weber's supper club

OPEN DAILY 12-2
3715 JACKSON ROAD

0

* -1
o JA
0 N DIA A R.n T S H 0P
4 . , -
has unusual and exotic gifts which
will add magic to any holiday.
Cop\er, Filigree Slver, and and TAPESTRIES,

Bbr
I Best Performance by an Actor in a Starring Role:
I (I
IBest Performance by an Actress in a Starring Role:!
I I
! Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role: I
I I
I Best Performance by qn Actress in a Supporting Role:
I Name I
I Address!
!------- - -------------------- ------ -_
YOU can stop
your running
when you buy
at the
114 E. William St.l
Between Main ando
Founrth Ave.
PHONE 7191
Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.
OPENt
Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. We have ICE CUBES
Riley's Capitol Market
Open every evening until 1 :00

;
I

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11

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III

I i-u .RNE

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