100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 23, 1952 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAYLY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23,195t'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, ~EPTEMBEfl 2~. 1952

Switches in
Personnel
Announced
(Continued from Page 1)
NUMEROUS appointments, pro-
motions and grant approvals by
the Boar d of Regents filled the
University's summer calendar.
In their June' meeting, the
Regents accepted grants total-
ling$68,639.44, made over 20 ap-
pointmer'ts to the executive
committees of several schools
and colleges and named four
new taculty members.
An operating oudget of more
than $22 million' for the 1952-53
year was okayed by the Regents
June 29, representing an increase
of two and a half million over the
previous year's budget.
* * *
SWELLING THE list of summer
appointments, President Harlan H.
Har.ber announced the naming of
103 faculty members July 1. Twen-
ty-two of, the appointments were
to the rank of professor, 36 to
associate professor and 45 to as-
sistant professor.
At the same time, Pres. Hatch-
.er named Dr., Walter J. Nun-
gester chairman of the Depart-
ment of Bacteriology in the Me-
dical School and Kent W. Leach
assistant director of the Bureau
of School Services.
Ten new faculty appointments
were approved by the Regents at
their July meeting. Further July
action concerned the granting of
four xates of absence and the
acceptance of $157,731.54 in grants
and gifts

STUDENT ADVISOR:

Zerman Replaces Fee
As Assistant to Dean
"Personalized operations" will be the byword at the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs this year as Dean of Students Erich A. Walter and his
staff carry out an enlarged program of student-administration liaison.
William S. Zerman, '49, who replaced Joe Fee as assistant to the
dean on August 1, will play an important part in carrying out the new
plans.
* * * ,*
BESIDES SERVING as general advisor to the 44 campus fraterni-
ties, Zerman will be called upon to counsel the Co-ops and to main-
* * * tain liaison between the Univer-
sity Hospital, Health Service and
"Ithe Office of Student Affairs.

NO PRESIDENT:
YR Plagued by Problems

I

(Editor's Note: This is the first in
a series of articles designed to ac-
quaint the student body with thej
various campus political organiza-
tions.)
By DIANE DECKER
With state, national and local
election time rapidly drawing near,
the University campus will be alive
with politicking this fall.
One group which is gathering
ammunition for the contest is the
Young Republican organization.
However, YR is starting the year
with a problem: how to get a na-
tional pi esident elected when its
own organization is without a
head
* * *
AT ITS February election, the
group selected a graduating sen-
ior for uresident, with the under-
standing that vice-president Ned
Simon, '55 would take over the
reins this fall. Simon was an or-
ganizer in the Taft for-President
movement here and feels that he

should now turn the gavel over to
an Eisenhower supporter, and thus
salve the bitterness engendered by
the, clash between forces last
spring.
A good bet is former club
president Dave Cargo, Grad.,
who started the local "I Like
Ike" group.
The only stumbling block to
such a proposal is the YR consti-
tution which, according to Simon,
does not provide for another elec-;
tion until February.
* * *
WHEN THIS problem is solved,
YR plans to swing into action with
a lively program of rallies and
speakers with a two-fold purpose:
to push the GOP slate locally.and
to build up a reservoir of future
Republican voters. "If you start
getting party supporters young
enough, you're bound to have a
stronger party later on," Simon
affirms.

YR shares this objective with
other l oung Republican clubs
across the country. They are af-
filiated with the State YR, the
Midwest and National Federa-
tions. Athough Young Republi-
can groups are most frequently
found on college campuses, any
person under 35 years old can
be a YR
Among the specific plans which
the local club hopes to carrv out
this fall is a registration drive and
bringing to the campus either E-
enhower or Nixon. Simon indi.
cated that either spe4er might
appear if he were given radic time.
Although YR did riot have a
booth at registration, Simon ex-
tends an invitation to the first
rueeting which will oe held in sev-
eral weeks to any interested peo-
ple. 'If we want to see Republi-
cans in office, we need party
workers.

Michigan Bell Welcomes
FORMER OPERATORS
to Ann Arbor
We have immediate openings for those student wives
who have had some telephone operating experience.
If you are one of these girls, drop in to see our em-
ployment representative. Ann Arbor has a fine group
of girls and a very attractive building which is located
only 21/2 blocks from the campus.
Visit us at:
Michigan Bell Telephone Co.
323 E. Washington St.3

YouT Surety Be a
WISE BIRD
when you possess a 1952
edition of this 'biggest
tittle book in the world."

WILLIAM S. ZERMAN
Film on Greek
Life Scheduled
For Tonight
"Toast to Our Brother," a tech-
nicolor movie about fraternity life,
will be shown at 7:30, 8:15 and 9
p.m. tonight in the Architecture
Auditorium as part of the Inter-
Fraternity Council's fall rushing
program.
Starring Joe E. Brown, the
movie was made on the University
of California campus and involves
the career of an incoming fresh-
man as he goes about rushing and
pledging a fraternity.

This latter job involves visit-
ing the indisposed students and
attending to their needs, he ex-
plained. "Actually," Zerman
added, "I will be acting as a
counselor to all students-not
just individual groups."
The husky former college foot-
ball player spent a hectic orienta-
tion week getting down to his new
job. Besides helping to get fra-
ternity rushing firmly underway,
he visited students at Health Ser-
vice, toured the South Quadrangle,
dined with Dean Walter and offi-
cisls of the Inter-Fraternity Coun-
cil and attended an open house at
Owen Co-op.
HIS PAST experience in the
field of personnel relations has
given him substantial preparation
for his new program. After he
graduated from the University
where he majored in Journalism,
Zerman visited over a hundred
colleges as field secretary for Phi
Gamma Delta. His two years of
travel brought him into close con-
tact with the internal organiza-
tion and activities at the schools.
A former 'Ensian staffer, Zer-
man served with the National As-
sociation of Manufacturers as
sales manager for the Ohio-Michi-
gan region before taking his Uni-
versity post.
Roomers Hit
By revival of
Old Regulation

I6

READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

1~s

f---

W

FAMOUS BRAND NAMES
at WILD'S
ARROW EXCELLO JAYSON
BOTANY McGREGOR
TERWOVEN FORSTMANN LORD JEI

.I

IN

FF

equipped to supply you with
LAW case books and Supplies.
Our LASsection is staffed by
law students to assist you on your

11

DAK'S

KNOX

HICKOK

SWANK

COOPERS

4

Little Blue Book
the famous 3 x 5 inch, 170
page pocket encyclopedia of
footbal)',chedules, scores,
rules, penalty signals, etc..
Contains champs and records
of all sports, fraternity data,
Qmen's style and dress infor-
#ation and spaces for ad-
,dresses cod pertinent per-
sonal memos.
Get Free Copy
while limited supply is
available. No obligation.
w WILD'S
.tcte Street on the Campus

BOB LEOPOLD'S Ann Arbor Al-
ley Cats will provide music for
the free, all-campus program.
Fraternity-inclined men are
also urged to attend the mass
rushingameeting at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday in the Union ball-
room, according to IFC rush-
ing co-chairman Bill Capitan,
'54. Bill Zerman, recently-ap-
pointed assistant to the Dean
of Students, and IFC officials
will speak on rushing and the
fraternity system in general,
Capitan said.
He also reminded those plan-
ning to rush any of the 44 frater-
nities to register at the Office of
Student Affairs, 1020 Adminis-
tration Building through Oct. 2.
Unlike past years, there will be
no rushing fee.
Dr. Mallery Talks
At BrazilMeeting
Dr. Otto Todd Mallery Jr., di-
rector of the University's Insti-
tute of Industrial Health, will de-
liver two papers this week at the
American Congress of Industrial
Medicine convening *pt. 20 to 28
in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Dr. Mallery, the only North
American delegate at the conven-
tion. w11 speak on "Occupational
Cancer" and later an "Organiza-
tion and Objectives of Industrial
Health at the University of Mich-
igan."
Following these addresses, Dr.
Mallery will visit the University of
Sao Paulo. in Sao P iulo, Brazil.

An until-now unenforced Re-
gents' by-law forbidding unmar-
ried male students to live in pri-
vate apartments has been given
new emphasis by the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs.
The by-law, prominently dis-
played on OSA bulletin boards for
the first time in many years, del-
egates to the Dean of Students
"authority to make exceptions to
those regulations in cases where
in his opinion conditions war-
rant such action."
: C "
BACK of the new emphasis on
the by-law, according to Dean of
Students Erich A. Walter, lie re-
peated violations of the rule by
University men which last year
caused both University and viola-
tors much "embarrasment."
Men seeking permission to
maintain private apartments can
make application for such ap.
proval to Karl Streiff, admini.
strative assistant in the Office
of Student Affairs.
According to Dean Walter, re-
sponsibility for registering his
apartment with OSA rests with
the student and is primarily a
matter of "courtesy and self-pro-
tection." Failure to secure an
apartment-permit, presumably,
could lead to prosecution before
Joint Judiciary Council. Students
receiving approval must agree to
observe all regulations governing
University residences.
For purposes of registration an
apartment is defined as any room
or group of rooms having a pri-
vate entrance.

BATES

STACY-ADAMS

VARSITY-TOWN

AFTER-SIX

ALLIGATOR

Veterans' accounts Capably Handled

MIXTURE 79

BRONZINI

I

.WILD'S
State Street on the:Campus

OVERBECK BOOKSTORE

9~

requirements.

THE LAW BOOK STORE

Phone 34436

1216 South University

11

L

s

4

I

*

TO

IGHT

*i

f

FREE ALL-CAMPUS MOVIE PREMIERE

THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL

presents an award-winning film

4-

NEW SHIPMENTS of

USED

TEXTBO0KS

"TOAST TO OUR BROTHER"

11

arriving daily!

* starring JOE E. BROWN
* filmed on the U.C.L.A. campus

s in TECHNICOLOR
* first Michigan showing

NEW BOOKS IF YOU PREFER
For that hard-to-find textbook

IN PERSON

try

/goG 6e/os4 ANN ARBOR ALLEY CATS
odixieland combo

rftmir1T

11

I

m

III

Il..u..

1 '0911m. = - - - - - - - - - -- . -

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan