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December 11, 1952 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-11

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PANE 91X

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1952

7'77--TE ICIANDAL

HOME FOR CHRISTMAS:
DickyBrink To End Stay at Hospital

Dicky Brink, 10-year-old polio
patient, will get his Christmas pre-
sents at home this year, instead
of at the University Hospital polio
ward.
The boy will end a 28-month
stay at the Hospital's respiratory
center tomorrow when he leaves
for his home in Morenci, Mich.
* * *
SEVERAL Wolverine gridiron
greats are expected to be on hand
for a "going home" party today.
The players have already present-
ed Dicky with an autographed
trophy of the Michigan-Cornell
game-a football bearing signa-
tures of Fritz Crisler, Bennie Oos-
terbaan, Ted Kress, Tim Green,
Bill Billings and other members
of the 1952 Wolverines.
The attention the boy has re-
ceived from the gridders has
been a factor in helping Dicky
overcome the fear of leaving the
Hospital and becoming adjusted
to living at home, according to
Dr. David G. Dickinson, the
center's medical director.'
An avid sports fan, Dicky not
only attended the Homecoming
game in Michigan Stadium, but
also saw a baseball game in De-
troit's Briggs Stadium last sum-
mer.
D I C K Y WILL continue to
breathe at home through use of
a chest respirator furnished by the
National Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis.,
He was admitted to the Hospi-
tal's contagious center Aug. 2, 19-,
50. He'developed complete para-
lysis in his entire body during the

'Birds' Goes
Into Second
Zany Night
Going into the second night of
its four day run, the speech de-
partment's modern adaption of
Aristophanes' centuries old farce,
"The Birds." will be performed at
8 p.m. today in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.
Starring in the zany satire about
what happens when the birds take
over are Conrad Stolzenbach,
Grad, as Euelpides; Kenneth Ros-
en, Grad., as Pithetaerus; James
Jones, '53, as Epops, the king of the
birds; Gwen Arner, '54, as Procne;
Bette Ellis, Grad., as the priestess
bird, and Joan Heiderer, '53, as
the leader of the chorus.
Tickets are still available for all
performances of the wild comedy,
including Saturday's. Prices are
$1.20, 90 cents and 60 cents with a
special student rate of 50 cents to-
night only.

........ ... .. ... --

Berry Answers Charges
Concerning NSA Finances

By HARRY LUNN
A detailed account of National
Student Association finances has
been prepared by Phil Berry,
Grad., to refute the charge of
"The American Student" that the
NSA "'milks about $37,790 a year
from students who are ignorant of
its very existence."
Explaining that the $37,000 fi-
gure was a preliminary estimate
which included large amounts of
jnoney raised by grants and not
used for national office operation,
Berry said the actual NSA budget
this year calls for expenses of
$17,100.
PRESENTLY serving as head of
the NSA Financial Advisory Board.
the former Student Legislature
vice-president is working to set
up Association financing on a per-
manently sound basis.
Berry pointed out that member-
ship dues have declined markedly

since the Association was founded
six years ago.
The income will go toward salar-
ies of student officers and general
office expenses, Berry said. Three
elected officials receive $2,000 a
year and work full-time for NSA.
In using the $37,790 figure,
"The American Student" did not
differentiate between student
dues and the thousands of dol-
lars provided by grants toward
the International Program and
the Leadership Training Pro-
gram, Berry added.
"Within the last month, how-
ever, Walter Annenberg, publisher
of the Philadelphia Inquirer, gave
the Association a grant of $2,500
for general office operation," he
said.
This was the first grant ever
offered for general Association
work rather than a specific pro-
ject, according to Berry. -

I I

DICK BRINK HOLDS AUTOGRAPHED FOOTBALL

early stages of the disease and
later was transfered to the center
for the highly specialized treat-
ment given there.
Dicky's more than two-year stay
4t the hospital has been longer
than usual, Dr. Dickinson said.
The average patient recovers
enough to leave in a few months.

For those
jproblem people3
on your
Christmas List ...
Fine Leather Goods
Distinctive Stationery II
and wrap them with our
Festive Gift Paper
MAYER-SCHAIRER cO. 3
112 S Main Street

Schulze Talks
On Families
The shift from rural to urban
life has caused pronounced changes
in the size and character of the
American family, Robert O.
Schulze of the sociology depart-
ment said'last night.
Schulze spoke on "Marriage and
the Family in the U.S.A.," the last
in a series of talks designed to
acquaint foreign students on cam-
pus with different aspects of
American life.
He told how industrialization of
the nation and its resultant migra-
tion to the cities had caused the
size of the family to decrease.
Once, a great number of child-
ren was needed in the family to
help with the chores, he explained,
but since the industrialization the
average family now has only two
or three children instead of the
seven or eight of 100 years ago.
Schulze also observed that al-
though we take them for granted,
dating and "romantic love" until
recently were unique to American
society.
Rushton Receives
Engineering Prize
J. Henry Rushton, director of
the chemical engineering depart-.
ment at the Illinois Institute of
Technology has been named 17th
recipient of the Walker Award for
outstanding achievement in his
field.
Rushton taught at the Univer-
sity several years ago.

Vulcans
Tickets for Vulcan Christmas
trains will be sold at a reduced
rate from 2 to 4:30 p.m. today
through Dec. 18 in the Admin-
istration Bldg.
Savings up to $8 may be made
by students buying fares
through the program, Vulcan
officials said.
Martinet Talks
On Languages
Over-emphasis of the diver-
gences of languages has been the
major difficulty in language study,
Prof. Andre Martinet, director of
the language department at Co-
lumbia University, said yesterday.
Prof. Martinet said the evolu-
tion of modern languages has been
erroneously compared to the
branching off of a "tree of lang-
uages." This simile ignores the
fact that languages continue to in-
flueceeach other even though

-Daily-Don Campbell
STUDENT ADVISORS-James H. Robertson, assistant dean of
the literary college instructs a student advisor. The students will
be available every Thursday afternoon for counseling until final
examinations. The program is sponsored by the Student Leg-
islature.
* ~* *
SL Counselors To Advise
Students In Picking ouse

Student advisors, counseling in
every course of study in the liter-
ary college, will be available from
3 to 5 p.m. today in Rm. 1025, An-
gell Hall for all students who have
not yet decided upon programs of
study.
The counselors have been chos-
en by concentration advisors and
department heads for knowledge;
of their programs of specializa-
Monetary Theory
'To Bie Discussed
Prof. Milton Friedman of the
University of Chicago will speak

tion. They will be prepared to ans-
wer questions regarding require-
ments of their respective fields as
well as to discuss individual cours-
es in their departments.
THE SL-SPONSORED counsel-
ing service, now in its second year
of operation, is an expansion of
the registration week student ex-
perts program which began in 19-
44 and continued for six years.
The revised program, designed
primarily to help students plan
their programs before registra-
tion begins, will offer counseling
every Thursday afternoon until
final examinations begin.

-u I

Look! Another man switched to Kentucky Club-
the thoroughbred of pipe tobaccos

1
i

they may be from different genetic to the members of the Economics Mort Friedman, '54, chairman
groupings, he continued. Club at 8 p.m. today in the Rack- of the committee, said that the
As a substitute for the previous ham Amphitheatre. service should be particularly val-
simile, Prof. Martinet suggested Topic of his speech will be "The uable to freshmen and sophomores
greater usof rte vester Classical Counter-revolution in who have not yet selected their
greater use of the wave theory, Monetary Theory and Policy." fields of concentration.
expli tempffetsofeoneand The meeting will be open to "The student counselors have
explain the effects of one language staff members and students in the already taken the courses and will
upon another ghen the two are economics department and the be able to discuss freely, from the
spoken in neighboring areas. business administration school, in student's point of view, the rela-
The professor once attempted to addition to all other interested tive merits of various programs of
compile a linguistic atlas reflecting students. study," he pointed out.
all the dialects and usages of lan -_______________________
guages in Europe. He found, how-
ever, that the task of writing such
an extensive atlas was too great
and suggested that in the future
such an attempt should be limited
to one small country.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds MnnOUfCinQ

DO IT TODAY! SWITCH TO
'KENTUCKY C LUB
Notice how much better your pipe tastes-how
much fresher your mouth feels when you switch to
Kentucky Club. Send for free catalog showing fine
pipes and how to get them at big savings. Mail
Poach Tobacco Co., Wheeling, West Va. Dept. 39

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