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December 04, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Ill, teh efs Leads
g-igan leers
SVersaie Wolverine Hockey Captain
Ra t ed Topnotch on Offense, Defense

CONFERENCE HOOP PREVIEW:
Minnesota Cagers Rated Title Threat

By TIANLY GURWIN
T on't call hi the "fly"
'for no tin.
Given ts nickname by his
teammates, Johnny Ma tchefts,
cpa o , Lh'152-53 edition of
the erie H sad, cer-
tainly lies up to his title.
* * *
HE IS CONST ANTLY with the
puck, whethcr ci nsively or de-
fensively, is an excellent stick-
hanIdler, and is a fiery competitor
from the opening face-oil.
Illatehefts a product of Eve-
,eth, Minnesota, a town that
has given many outstanding
hockey players to the Univer-
sity of Michigan, is looking for-
ward to another good year on
the ice
Two years ago, as a sophomore,
the smal but versatle Matchefts
was named on the All-NCAA squad
Tickets for Michigan's first
home hockey game with St.
Lawrence Saturday will go on
se tomorrow morning at the
,Ferry nc d Ticket Office. After
Saturday noon ducats will be
available at the Coliseum.
Students with I-D cards may
purchase tickets for 60 cents.
-Don Weir
following his appearance in the
NCAA championships with the
Michigan sextet at Colorado
Springs.
LAST SEASON, playing in only
14 contests due to scholastic dif-
ficulties, the "fly" racked up the
total of 27 points, earned by scor-
Ing 14 goals and assisting on 13
others.
Though admittedly he doesn't
possess an unusually good shot,
his aggre siveness and alert
play provide him with the op-
porinitty for blinking the red
light on niany occasions, -

Hockey coach Vic Heyliger
speaks enthusiastically about the
scrappy Matchefts. "He's going to
be a great captain, like Earl Keyes.
With his constant hustle and team
spirit, "Fly" is a natural team
leader."
* * *,
HEYLIGER terms Matchefts as
an excellent fore-checker and "un-
canny with the stick." Matchefts'
main weakness, according to Hey-
liger, is possibly that he stick-
handles a little too much. In prac-
tices, Matchefts is concentrating
on passing and shooting more, and
on not keeping the puck as long.
Before coming to Michigan,
the Minnesota puck chaser
played on the Eveleth High
School team, which is one of the
best high school teams in that
area. Matchefts is now a senior
in Physical Education and hopes
to graduate in June.
Upon graduation, Matchefts will
enter the United States Marines
as a Second Lieutenant. He has
no aspirations for entering the pro
game, but admits that if',he set-
tles in this part of the countr'y, he
may join a local team.
* * *
HOWEVER, that is at least
three years away. Right now
Matchefts is thinking about this
year's hockey team. Playing on
the first line with Earl Keyes and
John McKennell, Matchefts will
undoubtedly cause nightmares for
many a rival goal tender.
With his tremendous compet-
itive spirit, his aggressiveness,
his ability to play defensively as
well as offensively, his amazing
stick-handling ability, and his
general versatility, it is no won-
der that Heyliger has called him
"the best all-around player
Michigan has had in a decade."
They don't call himn the "fly" for
nothing.

By DICK LEWIS
(Second in a Series)
Coach Ozzie Cowles' fast-im-
proving Minnesota combine is ac-
corded the best chance of over-
taking top-rated Illinois for the
Western Conference cage crown.
Veterans Ed Kalafat, Chuck
Mencel and Bob Gelle are among
eight lettermen who return from
last year's surprise team that fin-
ished third in the Big Ten with a
10-4 slate.
, * *
BIG KALAFAT, a 6-6 junior
center from Anacanda, Montana
who was named to the second all-
conference five last season, is ex-
pected to carry the brunt of the
Ski-U-Mah scoring attack.
The 254-pound Gopher pivot
operator banked in 349 points
over the 1951-52 campaign for
an average of 15.9 per contest.
His high-water mark came with
a 30-point harvest against high-
ly- touted Kentucky.
Kalafat went on from that non-
conference scarp to place ninth in
the Big Ten individual scoring
race with 204 scores. In addition,
the big boy that got away from
the Michigan campus picked off

JOHN MATCHEFTS
.. . skating fly

Big Ten Television Committee
iscusses TV Policy in o

CHICAGO-(IP)-The Big Ten's
television committee yesterday dis-
cussed a 1953 football TV ' policy
which apparently will continue to
conform with NCAA's nationally
restricted program.
The group will submit its rec-
ommendations to the conference.
faculty representatives and ath-
letic directors tomorrow, but it
was significant that much of yes-
terday's discussion was spent on
the subject of televising filmed
football games.
* * *
A BIG TEN spokesman said no
specific recommendation for a
1953 policy was made by a TV
committee member.

Previously athletic directors
Doug Mills of Illinois and Fritz
Crisler of Michigan, both TV
committee members, had pro-
posed a breakdown of the NCAA
controlled program from a na-
tional to a regional basis.
The committee heard a full re-
port from commissioner K. L. Wil-
son on last weelk end's meeting of
the NCAA TV committee in New
York at which the group's 1952
program was described as satis-
factory.
IM SCORES
VOLLEYBALL
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 4, Theta Xi 0
Tau Delta Phi 4, Acacia 1
Phi Kappa Sigma 4, Phi Kappa Tau 0
Zeta Psi 4, Tau Kappa Epsilon 3
Phi Kappa Psi 4, Kappa sigma 0
HANDBALL
Sigma Alpha Mu 3, Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon 0
Delta Upsilon 3, Delta Sigma Phi 0
MCF 3, Foresters 0
Newman Club 3, Wesleyan 0
SWIMMING
Sigma Phi Eps defeated Alpha Delts
(forfeit)
ATO defeated Delta Tau Delta (forfeit)
Gomberg 29, Taylor 28
Kelsey 30, Strauss 27

CHUCK MENCEL
a year's seasoning
157 rebounds and maintained a
lofty .403 shooting percentage.
ERSTWHILE freshman stand-
out Chuck Mencel, another all-
conference second team selection,
is a fixture at one of the guard
posts.
Possessor of a deft jump shot
that ruined the Wolverines, in
two clashes last year, the 19-
year-old sophomore amassed
299 markers in 22 outings for
an enviable 13.6 average.
Mencel was largely responsible
for Minnesota's unexpectedly high
league finish with 192 tallies and
the tenth place Big Ten scoring
slot behind Kalafat.
* * *
ANOTHER BRIGHT spot in the
Gopher court aspirations is Cap-
tain Bob Gelle, a dependable 6-3,
215-pound forward.
Piek Petrie
Dick Petrie has been chosen
senior football manager for
next season, it was announced
yesterday, by Gerry Dudley,
grid manager for 1952.
At the same time Dudley said
Don Kennedy, John Hall, Wil-
lard Beard, and Glen Bearss
were appointed new junior
managers.

Minnesota's team leader holds
the Western Conference stan-
dard for best season shooting
average, hitting on 43 of 98 at-
tempts in the 1950-51 season for
a .439 percentage.
In his junior year, Gelle was the
fourth highest point-getter for the
Gophers with 195 tallies. He also
snatched 107 rebounds to back up
Kalafat in that department.
BIG CONCERN for Cowles is
finding a forward to replace
graduated Dick Means.
6-4 Glen Reed had the spot
sewed up in early practice ses-
sions but recently has given way
to reserve center John Wallerius.
who stands 6-6 and has garnered
two letters.
Senior Dave Weiss, dependable
front-court man who started
against the Maize and Blue at
Minneapolis last year, is also
available for the forward position.
IT'S ANYBODY'S guess who
will be playing alongside Men-
cel when Minnesota invades Brad-
ley for the season's opener Satur-
day.
Footballer Bob McNamara,
going in hoop scrimmages for
only a week, is seriously press-
ing junior Chuck Bennett and
soph Earl Johnson.
Churchill Wins
Athletic Honor
In SportsPoll
LONDON-(IP)-Emil Zatopek,
Czechoslovakia's triple Olympic
champion, beat out America's Bob
Mathias today as the world's No.
1 sportsman in a poll sponsored
by World Sports, official maga-
zine of the British Olympic As-
sociation.
In the unique poll of leading
sports authorities, Britain's Prime
Minister Winston Churchill tied
for sixth place, edging such not-
able athletic figures as Rocky Mar-
ciano, world heavyweight boxing
champion, and Casey Stengel,
manager of the champion New
York baseball Yankees.

BEGAN IN INDIANA: -
School Coaching Paved Way for Perigo

By WARREN WERTHEIMER
The man who has installed new
life into Michigan basketball is
a direct contrast to the style of
ball he teaches.
William Perigo is a soft-spoken,
easy going 200-pounder from In-
Cdiana, Lie has been associated with
the game of basketball for 25
years, beginning his long career
while attending high school in
Delphi, Indian.
AT WESTERN Michigan, he
payed undcr Buck Reed, one of
the earliest expon3nts of race
horse baske'tbal It is apparent
from the style of ball that Michi-
gan nw plays that Reed's teach-
ings had a great deal of influence
on Perigo, and the now Wolverine
mentor has the, highest respect
for his old coach,
When Reed retired in 1948,
Perigo was appointe to take his
place. -
After graduating from Western
SMichigan, Perigo played pro ball
with some of the top teams of the
day. He credits lve years in the
pay ranks playing with and
againsit the Al-Americans of the
tirtis with giving hm the con-
fidence and know-how to make the
grade as a coach.
ERNIE. McCOY'S successor
coacd x high school teams at
~Makisvi1, Iniana and Ben-
in harb f':, Michigan for ten
years before moving to Western
Michigan where his teams com-
piled a three year record of 42
wns and 29 losses cluding a tie
or tho MiAuerican Conference
Perioqha I1roght:ithhim
style of basket ball that is in-
terling to watch, win or lose
le aefers the fst break type of
game ove iesion basketball
becaue i crea much more
fan itet ad is more enjoy-
able for th: idyrs as well."
PERIGO was born In 1911 in
and he omeim(es gets out on the
at . , . . , . ' ' '

Lebanon, Indiana. His family now
makes its home in Sheridan, In-
diana, although the coach now
spends most of his time in Ann
Arbor.
Perigo is still an excellent shot
and he sometimesgets out on the

floor to show how it's done.
His charges will show how it's
done Saturday night when they
meet Pitt at Yost Field House.

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