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September 23, 1952 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

IGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1952
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.YLE and SCOTT
scottis
{ cashmere

h
Is

New Army
ROTC Plan
Begun Here
A new Army ROTC program,
which is designed to provide more
general training for cadets, will
be implemented here this fall, the
University's Army ROTC an-
nounced yesterday.
Called the Branch General pro-
gram, the new course of instruc-
tion is designed to produce "more
roundly developed basic officers
with an adequate knowledge of
all phases of the Army," accord-
ing to Col. V. R. Miller, head of
the University's AROTC unit.
THE UNIVERSITY is one of
the few schools in which the new
course, under which all ROTC
cadets will take the same courses,
is being offered.
Branch General eliminates the
former AROTC divisions of Quar-
termaster and Ordnance. To fa-
cilitate the transition for stu-
dents enrolled in the specialized
classes, the third year course
will be a modified Branch Gen-
eral.
Seniors will continue in the old
program while first and second
year cadets will go immediately
into the new course.
BY NEXT YEAR, the AROTC
here plans to change their entire
curriculum to the Branch Gen-
eral, under which students will not
indicate to which one of the com-
bat arms or services they wish
to be assigned.
AROTC officials emphasized
that the program is experimen-
tal and tentative and can be
altered when sufficient time has
been provided to test its prac-
tical workings.
Another innovation in the pro-
gram, is a classification board of
Army and University instructors
to assist the cadets in making their
choice of specialization.
Final cadet assignments will be
made by the Army using the
Board's recommendations as a
basis.

.;

r
to translate the sweater look into the soft-
est, prettiest, most feel-me, love-me' look
in the world. You have only to touch them,
and wonder at the kitten softness ... wear
them, and revel in their incredible luxury
*.. look at their flattering fully-fashioned
lines-to realize they are Lyle and Scott-
the world's most treasured sweaters, per-
fected by master-craftsmen in the Scottish
border hills.'
COLORS:Natural, Grey, Maize,
Navy,, Black, Lilac, Strawberry,
Brown,,Green, White, Light Blue,
Fushla.

Standing guard over the finan-
cial interests of some 16 to 20
thousand students and local citi-
zens is the chief business of the
State Street Branch of the Ann
Arbor Bank.
With University students open-
State School'
Heads To Meet
An exhibit of models and plans
of new Michigan schools will be
one of the highlights of the an-
nual University Conference for
School Board Members, School
Officials and Laymen on Thurs-
day.
The exhibit is intended to help
the some 800 persons expected to
attend to better understand
trends in school building con-
struction.
Lawrence E. Vredevoe, director
of the Bureau of School Services,
which is sponsoring the event, said
national and state authorities will
address the group and participate
in discussions on various subjects
including both financial problems
facing school districts this year
and significant trends in instruc-
tional programs.
Among the speakers will be:
Leo M. Bower, president of the
Michigan Association of Archi-
tects; Lee Thurston, State Super-
intendent of Public Instruction;
and Williard C. Olson, dean of
the University's School of Educa-
tion.
Industrial Arts
Program Enlarged
An expanded program for the
preparation of industrial arts
teachers went into effect at the
University with the beginning of
the fall semester yesterday, Prof.
Ralph C. Wenrich, chairman of
the Department of vocational edu-
cation and practical arts depart-
ment announced.

Official Aids Students
With BankingProblen

ing new accounts, Norman A. Ott
mar, branch manager, in an ir t-'
terview, pointed out several inc I-
portant steps in the process.

"Students attempting to ope1
an account with a personal chec
will be disappointed," Ottmar em
phasized. "The student must hay
a bank draft or cash."

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k

MONEY MATTERS:

'O ~*'

Before an account has be( i i
opened such personal checks wil 1
be cashed only after waiting fron 1
five to ten days for collection. Fo r
those already having an accoui t
with the bank such checks ar< (
cashed on sight.
Preliminary to opening an ac -
count two signature cards must b e
filled out and signed by some t)
sponsible adult.
In addition the student may sil n
with his Ann Arbor address, a n
authorization for the bank to mai I
a statement along with his can -
celled checks at the first of eaci
month.
Ottmar emphasized that no dis -
tinction is made between stude n t
and local accounts.
String Quartel.
To Tour State
The University's Stanley Quar-
tet will be heard in communitte s
throughout both Upper and Lowe :r
Michigan during the Fall Semen ;-
ter, Prof. Gilbert Ross, first v'i( )-
linist of the group, has announce d.
Other Quartet members ai -e
Emil Raab, second violin; Oliwrtr
Edel, cello; and Robert Court4 p,
viola.
The group will give public cor c-
certs in Grand -Rapids, Oct. 3 ar d
16; Flint, 'Oct. 10; Port Hurm a,
Jan. 7; and Grand Haven, Jax L.
9. An Upper Peninsula tour will ir t-
clide performances at Cryst al
Falls, Oct. 20; Marquette, Oct. 2 L;
Escanaba, Oct. 21; Manistiq'u e,
Oct. 22; and Sault Ste. Mari =,
Oct. 23.
Culminating their far-flung a -
tivities, the Quartet will play o a
Jan. 16 in Washington, D. C. i n
the Chamber Music Series of th e
Library of Congress under the aus
pices of the Elizabeth Spragliu
Coolidge Foundation. On this or; -
casion, they will introduce t i e
"Sixth String Quartet" of Ro s
Lee Finney, professor of compc E
sition andcomposer in residen.c :
at the University.
The Quartet will perform fo r
Ann Arbor audiences on Oct. 2f
and Dec. 3 in the Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.

''

I

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. . * . .m

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