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December 02, 1952 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-02

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGE SEVEN

mTmmUmESDAY, DECEM BER 2, 1952 PAGE SEVEN~mahnimlmiimliili

Michigan State Named
AP National Champion

NEW YORK - (MP) - Michigan
State, victor in 24 straight games,
took the No. 1 place in The As-
sociated Press' final poll Monday
to win the O'Donnell trophy, em-
blem of the national collegiate
football championship.
The O'Donnell trophy was
established in 1948 after Notre
Dame had won its third cham-
pionship. It is awarded yearly
on the basis of the final Associ-
ated Press Poll. Tennessee won
it last year.
The Michigan State Spartans
won the honor for the first time
this year in a walloping ballot in
which 271 sports writers and
broadcasters took part.
PRE-SEASON favorites, they re-
ceived 207 first place votes and a
staggering total of 2,683 points,
one of the largest ever accumulat-
°.d in the poll.
Points are awarded on the ba-
sis of 10 for a first place vote,
k- nine for second, etc.
Georgia Tech, Sugar Bowl-
bound and the only other major
unbeaten team in the nation, took
second place in the final standings
with 2,249 points, followed by No-
tre Dame, the upset king, with
1,809, and once beaten and once
tied Oklahoma, with 1,685.
* * *
BIGGIE MUNN, Michigan State
coach, received the news enthusi-
astically in New York where he
addressed a luncheon meeting of
football writers, but he proved
modest.
"It's the first such honor for
Michigan State," he said, "and
I am thrilled. However, the
honor really belongs to the play-
ers and assistant coaches on
my staff. The O'Donnell trophy

is an honor we will cherish for-
ever."
Picked in a pre-season Associ-
ated Press poll as the team most
likely to succeed, the Spartans took
charge the first week and held the
No. 1 slot for nine of the 10 weeks
of the campaign.
* * *
THEY were rooted out by Wis-
consin the second week. But the
following week they moved on top
again and never were headed
thereafter.
A well manned squad which
could throw in any one of three
platoons without noticeably weak-
ening its effort, Michigan State
had only two tight squeaks. The
Spartans barely beat Oregon State,
17-14, and Purdue, 14-7.
In other games, they downed
Michigan, Texas A & M, Syracuse,
Penn State, Indiana, Notre Dame
and Marquette.
The 20 leaders with total points
based on 10 for a first place vote,
9 for second, etc. First place votes
and team won, lost and tied rec-
ords in parentheses:
1. Michigan State 207 9-0 2,683
2. Georgia Tech 36 11-0 2,249
3. Notre Dame 4 7-2-1 1,809
4. Oklahoma 14 8-1-1 1,685
5. Southern Cal. 2 9-1 1,404
6.UC LA 1 8-1 983
7. Mississippi 3 8-0-2 950
8. Tennessee 8-1-1 781
9. Alabama 9-2 693
10.Texas 8-2 454
SECOND TEN:
11. Wisconsin 6-2-1 281
12. Tulsa 8-1-1 145
13. Maryland 7-2 87
14. Syracuse 7-2 56
15. Florida 6-3 55
16. Duke 8-2 48
17. Ohio State 6-3 46
18.Purdue 4-3-2 45
19. Princeton 44
20. Kentucky 5-3-2 41

-Daily-Don Campbell
HIGH POINT MAN-Milt Mead, 6' 7" Wolverine forward, drives
in for a shot during last night's 80-72 victory over Marquette.
Mead was Michigan's leading scorer with 16 points.
Hoernschmeyer Injures Rib;
May Miss Game with Bears

Kress Tops
Wolverines
On Offense
Perry, Topor Pace
'l' Pass Receivers
Tailback Ted Kress paced Mich-
igan's football team in individual
statistics according to figures re-
leased yesterday by Sports Public-
ity Director Les Etter.
The wiry Detroit junior rushed
for 623 yards and passed for 559
more to set a first year record at
1182 yards. This performance sur-
passed the first year totals of Tom
Harmon and Bob Chappuis, Mich-
igan's All America tailbacks of re-
cent years.
* * *
FRESHMAN WINGBACK Tony
Branoff was second to Kress in
rushing with 342 yards on 86 trips
with the leather. Frankie Howell's
4.8 yards per try was high in that
department. Howell gained 223
yards in 46 attempts.
The Teds, Topor and Kress,
accounted for most of the var-
sity's passing yardage. Topor
had 33 completions in 58 tries
good for 441 yards and two
touchdowns. Duncan McDonald
completed seven out of 17 for
90 yards and two scores.
Topor was on the receiving end
of 18 passes good for 208 yards and
four touchdowns. Lowell Perry,
the Wolverines' brilliant end, was
the top pass catcher with 31 re-
ceptions for 492 yards and five
touchdowns. Tad Stanford caught
12 for 200 yards and Tony Bran-
off grabbed 10 for 138 yards as
Michigan passers threw to various
receivers. * * *
KRESS AND TOPOR, with six
touchdowns apiece, led the scoring
parade, with Perry only one tally
behind on the strength of the five
scoring catches.
Bill Billings finished the sea-
son with a respectable 36.7 av-
erage on 40 punts. In the extra-
point department, Russ Rescorla
converted 24 times in 31 at-
tempts.
The team statistics showed
Michigan ahead of combined op-
ponents in every department ex-
cept passing. The varsity lost pos-
session of the ball via the fumble
route on 22 occasions. Opponents'
fumbles were recovered 20 times
by the Michigan defense.
The rugged Wolverine forward
wall allowed only 1149 yards rush-
ing to the nine opponents, while
the Maize and Blue offense netted
1852 yards on the ground in the
nine games.

Lions, Rams Hold Lead
In National Conference

TED TOPOR
. . . most valuable player
Grid Team
Picks Topor
As MY, P
(Continued from Page 1)
TED TOPOR, '53 Ed., who serv-
ed this year as Michigan's quarter-
back, was selected as the Wolver-
ines' "most valuable player" for
the 1952 season.
In addition to standing out
as the blocking back in Michi-
gan's intricate single wing of-
fense, he took over part of the
passing chore and compiled an
excellent pass completion aver-
age og .569 on 33 completions in
58 attempts.
The 210 pound senior from East
Chicago, Ill. was on the receiving
end of 16 passes, good for 208
yards and four touchdowns.
For Ted it was the climax to a
long climb after being converted
to quarterback when he came to
Michigan four years ago. He was
an All-State high school fullback
and it wasn't until mid-way in the
1951 season that he started seeing
action at quarterback for the Wol-
verines

The first place ranks of the Na-
tional Football League thinned out
considerably with the weekend's
games.
Detroit climbed into undisputed
first place in the National Con-
ference with a 48-24 victory over
the Green Bay Packers in their
traditional Thanksgiving Day con-
test. The Lions had been in a four-
way tie with the Packers, the
Rams, and the 49ers.
WITH THE EDVENT of Sun-1
day's games the Rams whipped
their West Coast rivals the 49ers,
34-21, to climb back up beside
Detroit in the driver's seat.
Los Angeles quarterbacks Bob
Waterfield and Norm Van
Brocklin were at their best in
leading the Rams to the win.
Ends Elroy Hirsch and Tom
Fears provided ready targets for
the duo.
On the ground Dan Towler and
Paul Younger rolled up most of
the Rams' 251 yards.
THE CLEVELAND Browns
bounced back after spotting the
Washington Redskins two touch-
downs to grab a 48-24triumph and
gain undisputed first place in the
American Conference.
They had been tied with the

Giants and Philadelphia but the
Pittsburgh Steelers slaughtered
New York, 63-7, and the Eagles
fell victim to the Chicago Cards
28-22.
Little Eddie LeBaron lofted two
first period aerials to Hugh Taylot
and Harry Gilmer to give the Red-
skins an early lead.
OTTO GRAHAM, stopped cold
in the first quarter, then stole the
show for the Browns, passing for
two markers and running for two
more in the remainder of the game.
From the moment Lynn
Chandnois ran the opening
kickoff back 91 yards for a score,
Pitttsburgh was in command in
a game which marked the worst
defeat in New York's history.
Four aerials from standout Jim
Finks found their receivers in the
end zone and Gary Kerkorian
came in to heave a fifth. Chand-
nois counted a second first quar-
ter TD when he skirted end for
47 yards on a play set up by Kyle
Rote's fumble.
SPIRITED DEFENSIVE play by
Card tackle Jerry Groom and the
flashy running of Ollie Matson
knocked the Eagles from their
first place berth.

DETROIT - (A) - Bob Hoerns-
chmeyer, regular right halfback
for the title-contending Detroit
Lions, may miss Sunday's National
Football League game with the
Chicago Bears because of bruised
ribs.

National Conference and have two
games remaining, with the Bears
and the Dallas Texans. The Bears
edged the Lions 24-23 in their
earlier meeting.
If loernschemeyer doesn't
play, Coach Buddy Parker will
probably shift Jug Girard, form-
er Wisconsin and Green Bay
Packer star, from left half to
right half.
Girard has"been filling in for
Doak Walker since the former
Southern Methodist All-American
was injured in the second game of
the season, Walker, although not
as fully recovered from a pulled
muscle as he had hoped to be,
would be pressed back into ser-
vice.
IF WALKER can't play Parker
will probably use No. 2 right half-
back Byron Bailey, a rookie from
Washington State, or star defen-
sive halfback Bob Smith at Hoern-
schemeyer's position.
A crowd of 40,000 is expected to
watch the Lions tackle the Bears
for the 38th time in a rivalry that
is one of the league's hottest.
Pro Standings
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
W L T Pct.
Detroit 7 3 0 .700
Los Angeles 7 3 0 .700
San Francisco 6 4 0 .600
Green Bay 6 4 0 .600
Chicago Bears 4 6 0 .400
Dallas 1 9 0 .100
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
W L T Pct.
Cleveland 7 3 0 .700
New York 6 4 0 .600
Philadelphia 6 4 0 .600
Chicago Cards 4 6 0 .400
Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400
Washington 2 8 0 .200
NEXT SUNDAY'S SCHEDULE
Chicago Bears at Detroit
Cleveland at Chicago Cards
Dallas at Philadelphia
Green Bay at Los Angeles
Pittsburgh at San Francisco
Washington at New York

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December 2, 1952
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