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November 21, 1952 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBiEIR 21, 1952

SPEECH THERAPY:
Coffee Hours Aid Patients

* * * *

By ELEANOR ROSENTHAL
Most students who dash out of
class for a 10 a.m. cup of coffee
are aware of a unique coffee hour,
taking place at the same time as
their own.
As part of its "disphasia pro-
gram," which treats speech loss,
the University Speech Clinic holds
a coffee hour every morning, to
give practice to patients learning
to talk again.
DISPHASIA, caused by brain in-
jury, can be the result of anything
from automobile accidents to
strokes. Since the problem is shar-
ed by a large number of Speech
Clinic patients, its treatment is an
important phase of the clinic's
work.
The purpose of the coffee hour
is to give the disphasia patient
an opportunity to talk in a sym-
pathetic but social atmosphere.
Conversation with fellow pa-
tients and outsiders is felt to be
a very effective way of restoring
confidence.
The practice of inviting guests
to meetings is stressed, and in the
past they have ranged from Pres-
ident Hatcher to members of the
football team.
As the guest enters, he is greet-
ed by someone in the group, who
acts as chairman. After a round of
introductions in which all parti-
cipate, coffee is served and discus-
sion begins.
Guests are asked questions, and
conversation turns to various top-

Latin Script
Illustrated
By Expert
Illustrating the various forms
which the Roman letter has taken
in the past 2,500 years, handwrit-
ing expert James Hayes, said yes-
terday at Clements Library that
the letter we use today is the
product of more than twenty-five
centuries of constant development.
"Yet it is amazing," Hayes em-
phasized, "how much alike the
earliest Roman letters are with the
form of writing in use today."
HAYES, THE calligrapher who
collected the material in the ex-
hibit of "The Roman Letter" now
on display at Clements Library
stressed the importance of the
broad-nibbed instrument used to
write with before the development
of the printing press.
"The broad sharp pen not only
gives handwriting an excellent
quality and character without
effort," he continued, "but is
actually the basis of all letter-
ing."
He 'suggested that the Chan-
cery style of writing be empha-
sized in all lettering courses, not
only in the universities, but also
in elementary schools because it
is clear, legible and easy to draw.
Koboyashi Speaks
On Land Changes
Prof. T. Koboyashi, of the geol-
ogy department at the University
of Tokyo, said yesterday that the
recent and ancient mountain
changes in Japan resulted from
sudden sub-marine eruptions.
Prof. Koboyashi spoke at the
Natural Science Bldg. on "The Mi-
gration of the Geosyncline Exem-
plified by the Tectonic Develop-
ment of the Japanese Islands."

PREUSS COMMENTS:
Lie Seeks Legal Advice
On Probe of Secretariat

rir

3

3!

-Daily-Alan Reid
SPEECH CLINIC HOLDS ONE OF ITS REGULAR
COFFEE HOURS

By JERRY HELMAN
As a result of McCarran Com-
mittee probes United Nations Sec-
retary Trygve Lie has sought the
advice of international jurists con-
cerning the position of the UN
with respect to member nations
questioning the activities of in-
dividuals in the Secretariat.
The much publicized group has
been -looking into possible Com-
munist spying activities by Sec-
retariat members.
COMMENTING on the situation,
Prof. Lawrence Preuss of the poli-
tical science department and an
international law expert, said that
{ there can be no question of the
jurisdiction of the United States
over members of the Secretariat,
Work To Start
On Fire House
Workmen are expected to begin
construction of the new south side
fire station just east of Packard
Rd., and E. Stadium Blvd. next
week, it was announced yesterday.
The city Board of Public Works
Wednesday night recommended
awarding the construction con-
tract to the Kurtz Building Co. of
Ann Arbor on the strength of its
$169,157 bid, the lowest of five
submitted for the project.
Animal Movies
The "Adventure of Willie the
Skunk," "Two Little Racoons,"
and "Curious Coati" will be the
films shown at 7:30 p.m. today
under the auspices of the Univer-
sity Museums.

whether American or alien, pro-
viding the investigations do not
interfere with their official duties."
"This was brought out in the
trial and conviction for espion-
age of Valentine Gubitchev, a
Russian employee. During the
entire proceedings, Lie made no
effort to shield or protect him,"
Prof. Preuss declared.
He further pointed out that the
legal relationship between this
country and the UN was fixed by
the International Organization's
Immunities Act of 1946 and the
Headquarter's Agreement of 1947
which set the legal relationship
between the U. S. and UN in the
latter's buildings and officers in
this country.
The Act provides that all Secre-
tariat employees will be immune
from U. S. jurisdiction when per-
forming official UN duties.
Secretariat employees must also
take an oath that while on duty
they will neither seek nor receive
instructions of member govern-
ments, who in turn pledge not to
issue orders.
If employees are suspected of
violating either the oath or the
agreements, they can be investi-
gated and dismissed if the
charges prove true.
"However," Prof. Preuss noted,
"it would be possible for the United
States to exercise their rights in
such a way as to hinder the func-
tioning of the UN."
"This government should use
moderation and have something to
go on before making indiscrimi-
nate charges and hindering the
work of the Secretariat, he said.
"The Headquarters Act was
carefully drafted to preserve the
rights of both parties, and, to date,
the UN has exercised moderation,"
Prof. Preuss added.

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* * * o
ics, from football to the problems
of co-patients learning esophageal
speech.
The latter are also patients at
Speech Clinic. Each has had his
larynx removed, and is learning
to speak through a tube leading
to his esophagus.
As frequent guests, they too

5

UK Ambassador Explains
Middle East Controversy

* - *
practice at the disphasia coffee
hours.
Much of the discussion is con-
cerned with projects, open houses
and demonstration visits to similar
institutions being among the more
common of these.
Prolonged speeches are usually
followed by comments from the
group on the speaker's progress.
However, it is not only the pa-
tients and the clinic's staff who
can see progress being made.
The contrast between the speech
of the oldtimers and the newcom-
ers is marked, an it is in hearing
them talking together that the
guest sees a real testimonial to the
success of the program.

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r

Hitting the high points of con-
troversy in the Middle East, Sir
Reader Bullard, former British
ambassador to Iran amplified his
country's policies in this area yes-
terday in a talk at Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
The English diplomat maintain-
ed that his country is fully aware
of the "nationalist tide" in the
Middle East and that since the be-
ginning of British intervention in
the area the British policy of fos-
tering eventual independence for
the Middle East has remained "es-
sentially the same."
* * *
DISCUSSING the situation in
Egypt, Sir Reader cited two major
areas of conflict between the Brit-
ish and Egyptians: the Suez Canal
and the Sudan region.
At the present time British
troops are stationed in the Suez
region and, by treaty, are to be
removed in 1956. Asserting that
it would not be safe to meet
Egypt's demand to withdraw
completely, Sir Reader expressed
Cinema Guild
Film Depicts
'Gallant_600'
Inaugurating the large screen
which the Plant Department has
just installed at Architecture Aud-
itorium, The SL Cinema Guild will
present the American film "Charge
of the Light Brigade."
Performances will be held at
5:30,'7:05 and 9:10 p.m. today and
tomorrow and 8 p.m. Sunday.
The vivid action tale includes
leopard hunts, native uprisings,
outpost massacres and a triangu-
lar romance. It comes to a spec-
tacular climax when the "gallant
600" charges with raised lances
through a deadly thunder of can-
non fire.

hope that an alternative plan
for security could be reached be-
fore 1956.
On the question of the Iranian
oil dispute, Sir Reader pointer out
that in 1948 the Iranians were of-
fered equal division of the profits
of the British oil company, but
that they turned it down "be-
cause," the diplomat said, "Iran
wanted half the profits gathered
in all the activities of the com-
pany instead of just those in Iran."
Sir Reader was severly chal-
lenged by several foreign stu-
dents in the audience. One grad-
uate student from Iran accused
the British and Sir Reader per-
sonally of keeping "the corrupt"
Riza Shah Pahlevi in power as
"a stooge."
An Indian student maintained
that Britain has lost power and
glory in the Middle East because it
no longer has the support of the
Indian army and consequently the
English are regarded as weak.
Sir Reader denied both charges.
On the first, he explained that his
instructions were to support any
one who was in power in Iran and
in addition, the Iranians were not
able to "dispose" of Riza Shah. In
answer to the second point, 'the
Englishman said that British poli-
cies are not based on "power poli-
tics."
Group Discusses
Business Topics
"Problems Arising Under Estab-
lished Executive Development Pro-
grams in Business" was the topic
of the Conference on Executive
Development held under the aus-
pices of the Bureau of Industrial
Relations yesterday.
Further sessions are scheduled
at 9:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. in the
East Conference Room of the
Rackham Bldg. Attendance is by
invitation.

iIF

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conducted by!
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MOZART JUPITER SYMPHONY
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The Great Jazz Musicians in their finest combinations.

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