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November 19, 1952 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1952-11-19

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PAGE TWO

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1952

_______________________________________________________________________________ m a I I,

Phoenix Proj ect Taeldes
Atomic Legal Problems

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sec-
ond in a series of articles dealing
with Phoenix Project progress design-
ed to give a picture of research ef-
forts in both the physical and social
sciences. Today's article explains the
project's studies concerning the legal
aspects of atomic energy.
By MIL PRYOR
Can a malformed person whose
grandfather was exposed fifty
years ago to excess atomic radia-
tion while working, collect dam-
ages from the company respon-
sible for his condition?
The Phoenix Research Project
on the Legal Problems of Atomic
Britain Seen
AsOpposing
r Step
TOKYO -- P)-- High British
sources here believe President-
elect Eisenhower will find Britain
reluctant to go along if he de-
cides to heat up the Korean War.

Energy has been set up to help
solve such legal brain twisters and
also to determine the various
changes and reinterpretations in
the lawr that atomic energy will
undoubtedly necessitate.
* * *"
THE PROJECT directed by a
staff consisting of Dean E. Blythe
Stason of the Law School, Prof.
Samuel D. Estep, Prof. Roy L.
Steinheimer, Prof. William B.
Harvey, and Prof. William J.
Pierce, all of the Law School, is
one of 54 sponsored by the Uni-
versity's $6,500,000 Phoenix Proj-
ect. It is the first of its kind in
the country.
The project has been broken
down into ten different divi-
sions: the history of the Atomic
Energy Act, powers of the AEC,
censorship problems connected
with scientific information, pat-
ent rights, rule-making powers
of the AEC, liability for injury,
community management, and
peacetime atomic energy and
private enterprise.
Approximately $25,000 has al-
ready been spent in research thus
far.
One of the most unique aspects
of the whole atomic energy field
is determining how injuries ac-
quired while working with atomic
radiation should be handled.
As the law now stands, a sta-
tute of limitations makes it im-
possible to collect for injuries
received any great time in the
past. However many effects of
radiation do not appear until
some time after they occur.
Although studies are not com-
plete, indications are that the
project will suggest a relaxation of
the laws in this case and perhaps
the setting up of some type of
board to determin proper pay-
ment.
* * *

New Labor
Law Plans
Hit by Taft
WASHIN~GTON - (' - Sen.
Taft said yesterday there undoubt-
edly will be a move in the next
Congress to outlaw industry-wide
bargaining but that as of now, at
least, he is against the proposal.
Such a plan would require un-
ions to bargain on a local or re-
gional basis, so as to decrease their
power to shut down entire indus-
tries of multi-plant companies by
means of strikes.
Taft told a news conference that
another move toward amending
the Taft-Hartley Act in the new
Congress probably will relate to
union welfare funds.
THERE HAVE been many sug-
gestions that the government
should have some supervision over
employer-financed funds for em-
ploye benefits. The largest such
fund is the 100 million dollar one
operated by John L. Lewis for soft
coal miners.
Sen. Taft said he felt the na-
tional emergency provisions of
the T-H Act should be retained
substantially as now written. Ile
said it was his idea to leave
them alone for' two or three
years to see how they work "un-
der a sympathetic administra-
tion."
President Truman has been
widely criticized by Taft and oth-
ers for failure to invoke the T-H
Law's emergency provisions in ma-
jor strikes, such as last summer's
two-month steel strike.
The law allows appointment of
a fact-finding board to report on
issues involved in such labor dis-
putes, but prohibits any settle-
ment recommendations. The pres-
ident can, on receiving the re-
port, seek a court injunction to
stop a strike for as long as 80
days. After that, Congress may

Some U.S. military leaders in
the Far East are hoping Eisenhow-
er will decide after his trip out
here to recommend that the Unit-
ed Nations build up their forces
and drive the Chinese back to
Manchuria.
The sentiment among well-in-
formed British circles in Tokyo is
that Britain would oppose a ma-
jor offensive at this time.
Here are some of the reasons
they give:
1. They say Communist aggres-
sion in Korea has been stopped.
Attacking now would mean
lengthening supply lines and any
new line farther north or on the
Yalu would be no better than the
present front.
2. An offensive large enough to
bring a military settlement would
require transferring troops to Ko-
rea from other trouble spots of
the world.
3. They say Russia is charging
Red China huge amounts for
arms and supplies. If opposing
forces continue the present large-
scale artillery bombardments, Chi-
ra will be the first to run out of
money.
4. They say China one day will
get tired of fighting Russia's war
for her and withdraw from Korea.
/ (1JiiMu~

z
S
1
3

may purchase a copy by applying at the
ICashier's Office, Administration Build-
ing. The charge is 75c.
Faculty, College of Engineering.
There will be a meeting of the Fac-
of this College on Mon., Nov. 24, at
4:15 p.m., 348 West Engineering Build-
ing.
Faculty Members who are participants
in the Teachers' Insurance and Annu-
ity Association Retirement Plan are
asked to return their College Retire-
ment Equities Fund applications to the
Retirement Records Office not later
than Nov. 30, 1952
Women candidates for SL may have
late permission until returns are final
or until 12:30 a.m. at the latest on
Wednesday, Nov. 19.
Choral Union Members whose attend-
ance records are clear, will please pick
up their courtesy passes admitting
them to the Horowitz concert, on the
day of the performance, Wed., Nov. 19,
between 9:30 and 11:30 a.m., and 1 to
4 p.m., at the offices of the University
Musical Society in Burton Memorial
Tower. After 4 o'clock no passes will
be issued.
Personnel Interviews.
The Du Pont Company, of Wilming-
ton, Del., will have a representative at
the Bureau of Appointments on Tues.,
Nov. 25, to see men receiving their
Ph.D. degrees either in February or
June in the fields of Pharmacology,
Bacteriology, or Biochemistry.
The Penn Mutual Life Insurance
Company, of Detroit, will have an in-
terviewer here on Tues., Nov. 25. The
representative will talk to men inter-
ested in sales.
Personnel Requests.
The United States Post Office in De-
troit has available positions for stu-
dents during the Christmas holidays.
Persons interested in temporary em-
ployment over the vacation should con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments.
The U.S. Civil Service Commission
announces examination for Highway
EngineerTrainee. This is open to Jun-
iors in Civil Engineering interested in
summer positions, and the work would
entail assisting in surveys, plotting sur-
vey notes, and working under profes-
sional guidance, in addition to other
duties. A Civil Service grade of GS-4
is given to the applicant after having
successfully passed the examination,
with a salary of $3,175 a year.
For further information concerning
these and other openings, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin-
istration Building.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
Departments of Near Eastern Studies
and Political Science. "Britain and the
Middle East," Sir Reader Bullard, for-
mer British Ambassador to Iran. Thurs.,
Nov. 20, 4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater.
University Lectures, auspices of the
Departments of Geology and Mineral-
ogy. Two lectures on Thurs., Nov. 20,
by T. Koboyashi, Professor of Geology,
University of Tokyo, "The Migration of
Geosynclines Exemplified by the Tec-
tonic Development of the Japanese Is-
lands," 4 p.m., 2054 Natural Science
Building; "The Evolution of Land Life
in Eastern Asia, Elucidated with Ref-
erence to the Akiyoshi and Sakawa
Cycles of Orogeny," 7:30 p.m. Natural
Science Auditorium.
Academic Notices
The Research Seminar in Quantita-
tive Economics is sponsoring a lecture
by Mr. Colin Clark, Wed., Nov. 19, from
3-5 p.m. 101 Economics Building. His
topic will be, "The Long-Run Rela-
tionship between Economic Develop-
ment and Population Growth." Faculty
and students are cordially invited.
(Continued on Page 4)

CLASSIFIEDS

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24.1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70, 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sundayissue.
LOST AND FOUND
BROWN LEATHER notebook in play-
ground next to South Quad. $5.00
reward. Phone 3-0521 ext. 309. )55L
LOST-Small canvas sack containing
wrenches between campus and Whit-
more Lake. Reward. F. A. Simpson,
U of M Plant Dept. electric shop.
LOST-Sterling thistle designed linked
bracelet, last 'Saturday, in or near
stadium. Keepsake. Reward. 6243
Evenings, )56L
LOST-Notebook glazed formulas left
At Aud. D, Angell Hall, Homada lec-
ture. Extremely valuable to owner.
Call 2-6230. Reward.
FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models;
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
STUDENTS-Up to i3 off on diamonds,
watches, rings, electric shaver, silver-
ware, appliances and all other jewelry
items. Any nationally advertised pro-
ducts at these savings. Ph. Ed Neback,
Lit. '53, 3-1713. )59
2% x 3 PACEMAKER speed graphic,
fully equipped, like new. Phone Henry
Arnold 3-4141. )40L
PARRAKEETS, babies and breeders, ca-
naries, singers, cages and supplies. 305
W. Hoover. Phone 2-2403. )85
EVERGREENS
Plant till ground freezes hard.
Spreading & upright junipers 2.25, 7.50
Spreading & upright gums 2.25, 3.25
Mugbo .(dwarf Pine)........2.50, 4.50
Pyramidal & globe
Arbor Vitae................2,50, 5.00
Call M. Lee 8574 or U. ext. 2410. )91
FOR SALE-1951 Anglia 35 mpg like
new. Call 3-3177 after 4 p.m. )98
TUXEDO-Never worn. Size 40. $45.
Call Jim at 2-0631. )96
GET YOUR official Michigan ring at
Burt Patts. 1209 S. University, phone
8889. 197
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

CINEMA SL GUILD
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
3 NIGHTS
STARTING FRIDAY

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Photographic exposure me-
ter norwood director-never used, ex-
cellent bargain. Phone Lou Slavin,
3-8508, )95
MEN'S Gabardine dress pants $5.65.
Well tailored, assorted colors. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington St. )99
1948 AUSTIN, two door. Call 2-2177
after 6 p.m.
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR OVERNIGHT GUESTS--
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R
3 FURNISHED rooms, private bath, pri-
vate entrance, gas heat, continuous
hot water. 1125 Michigan 3-1791. )33R
ROOM AND BOARD
SINGLE ROOM & BOARD for research
or professional man. Also double for
two (can part pay with duties in
house). Live with congenial cultured
group on campus. 520 Thompson. )4X
HELP WANTED
PRIVATE HOME, desires person either
male or female to help cook dinners
five nights weekly. Call 7468. )52H
WANTED -- Experienced salesman for
part time help. Must be here for
Xmas. A. A. Cut Rate. 113 So. Main.
)39H
PART TIME window trimmer wanted,
male preferred. Also can do other
work If desired. Wilkinson Luggage
Shop, 3-4013. )48H
FULL OR PART TIME experienced per-
son in men's clothing and furnishings
preferred. Apply Dixie Shops, 224 S.
Main, Ph. 3-2186. )49H
PRIVATE HOME, desires person either
male or female to help get dinners
five nights weekly. Call 7468. )52H
MALE STUDENT to work for meals on
campus. Phone 2-6422. )51H
STUDENTS wanted for part time fac-
tory work between 1:00 a.m. and 8:00
a.m. ApplyUniversal Die Casting,
232 Monroe Street, Saline, Michigan.
)53H
SALES LADIES-Full or part time. Ap-
ply at Dixie Shops, 211 S. Main. Phone
3-2186.
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S. State St., Phone 7177. )8B
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto -- Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Uni., Ph. 7942 -
111 blocks east of East Eng. )15B
MISCELLANEOUS
BEEN MEANING to find out about our
student faculty and regular specials,
haven't you? Well, if you are not do-
ing anything why not inquire now.
Student Periodical Agency, 6007. )17M

THRO UGH SPECIALIZED

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in buying, advertising, fashion, personnel,
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Scholarships available.
Send for Bulletin C
SCHOOL OF RETAILING
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh 13, Pa.

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING QUICK RESULTS

"A sight to see - a ,rand movie"-N.Y. TiMes
CHARGE of THE LIGHT BRIGADE
ERROL FLYNN
OLIVIA
DeHAVILLAND
The young executive
MAKES HIS MARK IN RETAILING

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Weekdays, 6:30 to 11:30
Sat., Sun., 1:30 to 11:30
ADMISSION ... 446

:.._

- STARTS TODAY-
TOGETHER ..a. e '7ejc 0f

BING
CROSBY
JANE
WYMAI(

DUE TO THE secret nature of
most atomic discoveries, it is
usually impossible for a patient
who feels that he has not been
properly compensated to have his
case reviewed by a court. Many
times a workman who has been
injured cannot appeal his settle-
ment because it would reveal clas-
sified information.
The project is looking into
ways of remedying this situa-
tion. One obvious solution would
be to have a court especially
cleared for security and let them
sit in on all such cases. This
however would introduce a new
concept into national law.
In cooperation with the Phoenix
Project, the Law School this sum-
mer sponsored an institute in
Atomic Energy-Industrial and
Legal Problems. This institute was
devoted to industrial and legal
problems arising from the peace-
time utilization of atomic energy.
'U' Symphony
To Give First
Performances
The University Symphony Or-
chestra, conducted by Prof. Wayne
Dunlap, will give their first con-
cert of the season at 8 p.m., Nov.
24 in Hill Auditorium.
The 100-piece orchestra has been
in existence since 1887, when it
served as an accompanying or-
chestra for the University Musical
Society. Over the years it has been
under the direction of a number
of conductors, including Thor
Johnson, the present director of
the Cleveland Symphony Orches-
tra.
Many former students who
played with the group while at-
tending the University are now
associated with major symphony
orchestras throughout the country.
The orchestra made an earlier
appearance this year in the an-
nual Children's Concert on Oc-
tober 15 and will play at the an-
nual Mid-West Music Conference
in January besides its annual Con-
certo Concert on December 15.

pass
with

special legislation to
the situation.

deal

DAIL'Y
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding. publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday.)
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1952
VOL. LXIII, No. 50
Notices
Student Tea. President and Mrs.
Hatcher will be at home to students
from 4 to 6 o'clock, Wednesday, Novem-
Directory. Those individual members
of the faculty and staff who need the
Directory for 1952-53 for use at home
EE

JANUARI Z-3

At
8:10

PLUS
. .THE
co-starring Jody LAWRANCE
Gale ROBBINS - Anthony QUINN

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NOW SHOWING

OPENS TONIGHT
No +
Gilbert & Sullivan's
Yeoman of the Guard
presented by
The University of Michigan Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Wed., Nov. 19--Thurs., Nov. 20-Fri., Nov. 21--Sat., Nov. 22
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Tickets can be bought at the box office.
Time: 8:00 P.M. Tickets: $1.20-90c

GOLDEN APPLES
LUNCHEON MENU
SOUP DU JOUR. . . CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP...
CUP 15c BOWL 30c
TOMATO JUICE, ORANGE JUICE, GRAPEFRUIT JUICE ... 15c(S
SHRIMP COCKTAIL . 65c
STUFFED CABBAGE, EGG SAUCE . . . 85c
POTATOES, SLICED TOMATO SALAD
ROAST BEEF, BROWN GRAVY . . . $1.35
POTATOES, VEGETABLE, COFFEE OR TEA
BAKED SHORT RIBS, HORSERADISH SAUCE ... $1.25
POTATOES, VEGETABLE, COFFEE OR TEA
CHICKEN SALAD PLATE . , . TRISCUITS . . . 90c
GOLDEN APPLE SALAD BOWL ... 75c
GOLDEN APPLE SPECIAL
CUP OF SOUP
COLD ROAST BEEF SANDWICH
COFFEE OR TEA
85c
FROM OUR BAKERY . .. FRESH APPLE PIE.. . 25c
ICE CREAM, SHERBERT ... 20c
NOW! STfI Today
PRICES . . . This Engagement Only
MATINEES 74c
NIGHTS 95c

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On Thanksgiving Trips Home

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A ROSICRUCIAN LECTURE
"MAN'S HIDDEN DESTINY"
Nov. 20th...8 P.M.
at the Women's League
will be given by Dr. Lajune Foster, a member of the
Board of Directors of the Rosicrucian Fellowship.
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED
For ffurther information, call 2-1507.

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