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November 13, 1952 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-13

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six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAT, NOVE~MBER 13, 1952

NO COVER CHARGE':
Mgimes To Sponsor 33rd
UnionOpera Production

Voting Privilege Granted
To Women of Lebanon

By BOB APPLE
The performance of "No Cover
Charge" will mark the 33rd time
that Mimes of the Michigan
Union will sponsor the Union
Opera.
The history of Mimes, an elec-
tiye honorary society dedicated to
the furthering of play productions,
dates back to 1913 and the Union
Opera of that year, "Contrary
Mary."
IN WAS IN that year a group
of. prominent members of the
Union Opera formed together to
organize a dramatic club. The
small club quickly blossomed with
the presentation of short- skits,
plays, musical numbers and im-
personations.
Soon, however, they began to

.rueblood

Cites Danger
To America
The most important threat fac-
ing the American people is not
Russian aggression as such, but
rather the possible weakening of
our convictions during a long pe-
riod of tension, according to Prof.
Elton Trueblood, of Earlham Col-
lege. who spoke at yesterday's
speech assembly.
Discussing "The - Basis of the
Life *We Prize," Prof. Trueblood
said that to counteract this dan-
ger of internal failure, today's
youhig people- must "consistently
and thoroughly build up a body of
thought concerning the meaning
of the good life."
*COMMUNISM, he said, gets its
main strength, not from its politi-
cal and' economic implications, but
from the fact that it has become
a faith for a group of young peo-
ple in an area covering half the
earth's surface.
Citing the rapid rise of com-
munism as, an indication of its
power, he said that it can only
be compared to Islam, which
constituted, on a smaller scale,
the same sort of mass movement.
Fo this reason, according to
Pref. Trueblood, our world tensions
,will not .be alleviated in the for-
seeable future. "There is no evi-
dence" he said, "that we in this
century can live in peace."
Instead, we must learn to 'ac-
cept this condition, and must sum-
mon all our resources to help us
to meet its challenge.'
He also spoke of the "interim
mentality," a state of mind relat-
ed to the old "eat, drink and be
merry, for tomorrow we die" phi-
losophy, which he felt was one of
the main stumbling blocks 'this
generation would have to over-
come.

confine their production to sa-
tiric impersonations of prom-
inant personages in the public's
eye and appropriately named
their society "Nimes," which
means mimic.
Since 1913 the sponsorship of
the Union Opera has been Mimes'
foremost undertaking. The Opera
improved yearly and in 1923
reached its' greatest heights by
playing in the New York Metro-
politan Opera House.
Besides sponsoring the Opera,
Mimes also staged several spring
dramatic productions on their
own well-equipped playhouse be-
hind the Union.
* * *
DISASTER seemed to strike
this flourishing organization when
the depression hit. The Opera
was called off until 1934 when
Mimes enlisted the aid of Miss
Sally Rand to engineer a revival
of the annual show.
During this times Mimes play-
house was removed to make way
for additional buildings around
the Union, so the Opera be-
came the group's primary con-
cern,
The Opera went under again
with the outbreak of World War
II and stayed inactive for eight
years.
In 1949 Mimes revived the Opera
,withthe production "Froggy Bot-
tom."
Tickets Scarce
For Musical
"Brigadoon," the charming dance
and song tale of an enchanted
Scotch village that comes to life
for one day every century, will
continue its run at Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre today, tomorrow
and Saturday.
The curtain will go up on the
second performance of the Stu-
dent Players production of the
Broadway hit musical at 8 p.m.
today.
Tickets at $1.20 and 90 cents
will be on sale at the Mendelssohn
box office from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
and for half an hour before cur-
tain time, today, tomorrow and
Saturday, the nights of the per-
formance.
The Friday and Saturday per-
formances are sold out, but last
minute cancellations may be avail-
able, according to Joseph Gadon,
'53, Student Players president.
Furniture Display
A public display of the latest
In business office machines, fur-
niture and supplies will be shown.
at the seventh annual exhibit of
the School of Business. Adminis-
tration, from 1 to 5 p.m, and 7 to
9 p.m. today and tomorrow at the
Rackham Bldg.
Read Daily Classi fieds

By ALICE BOGDONOFF /
While some women in the Unit-
ed States are contemplating cab-
inet posts, women in Lebanon
were just last week granted the
right of franchise.
But not all Lebanese women will
vote. The law stipulates that in
order to vote, women must have
had a primary education. And once
the qualifications are filled, wom-
en must vote or else be subjected
to fines up to $27 as men are.
The move for women's suffrage
came when Prime Minister Khak-
id Shehab's government issued an
election decree which, in addition
to giving women the suffrage, cut
the number of parliamentary
seats almost in half and drastic-

,..

r

ally revised the basis of represen-
tation.
PROF. MARBURY Efimenco of
the political science department
and specialist in the Near East
commented last night that "one
would have expected Lebanon to
take this step earlier since Leb-
anon is one of the more modern,
cosmopolitan countries of the Near
East."
Efimenko explained that the
reformist decrees of the gov-
ernment were made possible by
the cabinet's six month dictorial
powers zranted to it by parila-
ment. "The emergency powers,
came as a result of long general
agitation for the removal of the
corruption in President Camille
Chamoun's .rule," .Efimenko
pointed out.
He went on to explain that
there are strong "political bosses"
in the Lebanese parliament and
that the small reformist groups
apparantly hope to "get rid of
there bosses and corruption" by
widening the franchise to women.
George Trug, Grad., from Leb-
anon commented that the new de-
cree is "a fine move." He expressed
the view that voting should be
compulsory because "it makes the
people more conscious of their
stake in government."

SPECIAL PURCHASE

SA-

E

--Daly-Chuck Kelsey
COFFEE HOUR-Faculty members take a few minutes off for
coffee in the newly opened sixth floor Haven hall coffee lounge.
Coffee, cake and other snacks are on sale for University staff mem-
bers. Though the lounge has only been open for a week and a
half-it is doing a soaring business. Located near the offices of the
psychology department, it is frequented by members of the Eng-
lish, history, psychology, sociology and political science staffs.
Big Ten Student Conference
Formulates Constitution Plans

Delt Pledges
To AidScouts
About 15 Delta Tau Delta
pledges will be .waxing floors and
washing windows at the head-
quarters of the local chapter of
the Girl Scouts tonight.
The project was planned when
the Girl Scouts informed the In-
terfraternity Council they had no
feasible means of cleaning up their
Nickels Arcade office.
The pledges are scheduled to be-
gin work at 7:30 p.m. today and
will continue until they have giv-
en the headquarters a thorough
clean-up.
nRMW OF MR

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At the annual Big Ten student
government conference held at
Purdue, Nov. 7 and 8, plans were
drawn up for a Western Confer-
ence student government associa-
tion constitution.
If ratified by all 10 schools, the
constitution will serve to formalize
the interchange of ideas between
the various colleges.
* .* *
ALTHOUGH there is now com-
munication among the Big Ten
schools most of it is done between
two schools because there is no
centralized office.
The proposed constitution
calls for a central filing system
of all student governments, to be
handled by a different school
each year. This will provide a
faster and more efficient pro-
gram of communication. The
central office, to be set up this
year at Minnesota, will also plan
various conferences of the Big
Ten student governments.
Provision has also been made in
the constitution whereby the Big
Ten student presidents may joint-
ly issue statements of opinion on
matters of students interest.
The formal draft of the consti-
tution, to be sent each school by
School Artists
Enter Exhibit
Eleven artists in the Universi-
ty will have works displayed in the
43rd annual Michigan Artists Ex-
hibition which opens Tuesday in
Detroit.
Students being represented are:
John D. Farnham, Grad.; John
L. Goodyear, Grad.; Jamie Ross,
'56SM and Don Zanfagna, '53A&D.
Wolks in oil, water color and
sculpture by the following profes-
sors will also be shown: Gerome
Kamrowski, Carlos Lopez, Thomas
F. McClure, Jean P. Slusser and
Emil Weddige.
Others represented will be Mar-
garet H. Chapin of the University
High School and William A. Lew-
is of the Engineering Research In-
stitute.
The exhibition, to be held at
the Detroit Institute of Arts, will
continue through Dec. 21.

January, will become effective if
ratified unanimously before Feb-
ruary.
The Student Government Con-
ference also included a student
workshop where legislative plans
from all schools were discussed and
compared.
Representing the Michigan Stu-
dent Legislature were, Bob Neary,
'54BAd., Phil Berry, '53 BAd., Rog-
er Wilkens, '53, Chris Reifel, '55
ano Robin Glover, '53.

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