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November 09, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9,1953

MONO

EKE' MEETING PLACE:
Temple Mystifies Campus

Campus
Calendar

. . . C

The Delta Kappa Epsilon Tem-
ple, thought to be everything from
the ancestral home of a long-dead
president to headquarters of a sub-
versive movement or a deserted
church, still remains a mystery to
many Ann Arborites.
Located on Williams Street be-
tween a tailor shop and a grocery
store, the strange Victorian struc-
ture has long been cause of con-
.ecture among students. Despite
the DKE initials over the door, few
people know its function.
THE TEMPLE was built in 1878
as a Delta Kappa Epsilon Social
Fraternity meeting place. At the
time, it was situated in the middle
of an empty field, a short distance
from campus.
Twelve years later the present
wall was added for privacy.
However, the rest of the
building has remained much the
same., Original gas fixtures are
still in the house and gas is used
to light and heat the meetings.
Since it was first built, tradi-
tion has decreed that the house
only be used by members of the
fraternity. Reportedly, no woman
or non-"Deke" has ever set foot
Inside its doors.
* S *
THE TEMPLE is not unique to
the local chapter of the fraternity.
There are three other such "Deke"
,meeting places across the country.
Best known is the Windowless
Tomb at Yale.
After each chapter meeting held
late on different Saturday nights,
the Dekes march signing from the
Temple in a double line to the
home of the University president.
The ceremony's purpose is to hon-
or members who died in the Civil
War.
Many years ago it was part of
the tradition to return after the
march to the temple and drink a
secret non-alcoholic brew made up
from a formula perfected at Eng-
land's Carus College.
Cheerleaders
Attend Meeting
More than 3,000 colorfully-
dressed high school cheerleaders
invaded campus yesterday to at-
tend the annual Cheerleader's Day.
The peppy crowd represented
283 Michigan schools.
Their schedule began with a
clinic in the morning, at which
University cheerleaders discussed
and' demonstrated techniques. Un-
der the direction of Newt Loken,
gymnastic coach and cheerleaders'
advised, they showed several nov-
elty cheers, tips on good cheerlead-
Ing and tumbling and-Juggling.
Loken gave a talk on "Modern
Trends in Cheerleading."
In the afternoon, they saw the
Wolverines wallop Cornell from
an end zone section in Michigan
stadium, guests o the Bureau of
School Services and the physical
education department.
Students To Play
New Compositions
Musical works written by stu-
dents will be performed at a Com--
position Forum, to be held at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow in the Rackham
Assembly Hall.
The Forum will be under the
direction of Prof. Ross Lee Fin-
ney of the music school, composer
in residence at the University.

EVENTS TODAY
ORIENTATION TALK-Dean of
Women Deborah Bacon will give
one of a series of orientation talks
primarily for foreign students at
7:30 p.m. at the International
Center.
Her topic will be "Boy-Girl Re-
lationships on Campus."
MUSIC CONFERENCE - Ap-
proximately 50 persons will rep-
resent 20 Michigan civic or-
chestras at a music conference
at 3:30 p.m. in the League.
The purpose of the meeting
is the presentation and discus-
sion of subjects of interest to
civic orchestras. It is sponsored
by the Michigan Civic Orches-
tra Association, Ann Arbor Civic
Symphony and the University
Extension Service.
UNESCO COUNCIL - The UN-
ESCO Council will meet at 8 p.m.
at the Madelon Pound House'
1024 Hill.
John Davies, '53 world cham-
pion swimmer will be present to
comment on slides of the Olympic
games.
* * *
RELIGIOUS MEETING-Char-
les W. Brashares, Bishop of the
Chicago area of the Methodist
Church, will speak at 3:30 p.m. at
the First Methodist Church at the
Ann Arbor district United Evan-
gelistic Mass Meeting.
* * *
EVENTS TOMORROW
RUSSIAN CLUB - The Russian
Club will meet at 8 p.m. at the
International Center.
* * *
PUBLIC HEALTH-Dr. William
P. Yant of the Mine Safety Appli-
ances Co. of Pittsburg will speak
on "The Work Environment in a
Changing World" at 4 p.m. in
the School of Public Health Audi-
torium.
JAPANESE LECTURES - Soe-
tsu Yanagi, director of the Folk
Art Museum of Tokyo, will talk
on "On Japanese Crafts" at 4:15
p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Shoji Hamada, leading Japa-
nese potter, will give a lecture-
demonstration on "The Potter of
Mashiko" at 8 p.m. in Auditorium
D, Angell Hall.

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As seen in SEVENTEEN
Let's play tic-tae-toe in this murmuring patterned
taffeta designed by Jonathan Logan with cleverly
detailed kerchief tie at neck. A wonderful wide skirt
remains stiff when worn with or without a crinoline.
The simple black button trim on'bodice and sleeves
plus shiny patent belt affords excellent contrast with
this conversation-making print. Marvelous shades, all
etched in black--well priced to fit within every
junior budget.
Sizes 7-15 $14.95
'RINP~w W-9

.-.

Dance tested by Rita Hayworth
Dark Seam

I

Sheers
by MOJUD

Rita Hayworth
starring is
"Affair in Trinidad"
A Colvmin Picture,
,,Corporation Relse.

Sh

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-Daily-Alan Reid
"DEKE" TEMPLE-The meeting place of the Delta Kappa Epsi-
lon fraternity, built in 1878, still stands on Williams Street be-
tween a tailor shop and a grocery store. Reportedly, no women
or non-"Deke" has ever set foot within its doors.

"I wore wispy sheer Mojuds for
three weeks of gruelling dance
rehearsals and they never sagged,
wrinkled or ran," says lovely
Rita Hayworth. It's Mojud Magic.
Motion . . . extra "give" and
spring-back in the knit ... that
makes them cling without a wrin.
kle - wear, wear and WEAR.
Dark seam sheers add slimming
glamour to your legs. Try Mojuds
today ... in your own propor.
tioned size. You'll love them.
Paree: Dark Seams, ultra sheer 51-
gauge-15 denier .........$1.35
Other MOJUD Hose from $1.25
Special Prie per box

LOOK and LISTEN
With ALAN LUCKOFF
Daily Radio Editor

0

The nation's first full scale TV
coverage of election returns proved
that television is still a very young
medium.
The mechanical failures of the
various counting devices rigged up
by the networks left a few com-
mentators groping for a few min-
utes. John Cameron Swayze on
Peace Policy
To Be Topic
Of SRA Talk
Mts. Vera Micheles Dean, re-
search director for the Foreign Pol-
icy Association and editor of its
publications will lecture on "A For-
eign Policy for Peace" at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday.
Her talk will be the third in the
series "This I Believe," sponsored
by the Student Religious Assoscia-
tion and the Campus Religious
Council.
Mrs. Dean was born in Russia
and educated both there and in
this country. A U. S. citizen, she
is recognized as an expert on for-
eign policy, especially European
affairs. In 1950 in India, she spoke
from the same platform with
Prime Minister Nehru to an aud-
ience which included members of
the Indian cabinet.
Her books include "Europe in
Retreat," "The Four Cornerstones
of Peace," "Russia: Menace or
Promise," and "United States and.
Russia," which contains a fore-
word by Sumner Welles. Her lat-
est book, "How to Make Friends
for the U. S." is scheduled for re-
lease in 1953.

NBC especially had his troubles
when all kinds of things failed to
function. But he carried on in the
old tradition.
ABC, not taking any chances,
resorted to the old fashioned
blackboard for posting the state
by state results. John Daly had
a hard time getting through the
entire 48 uninterrupted, because
things went so slowly.
But these beginners' failures do
not detract from the generally fine
coverage by TV. Millions of peo-
ple were able to sit in their homes
and watch Gov. Stevenson con-
cede from Springfield and Gen.
Eisenhower speak from New York,
in addition to seeing and hearing
the latest returns.
Television is here to stay as a
news medium .:. and we're glad
of it.
* * *
ONE OF THE all time classics
of English literature, Charles
Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities"
will be aired on the speech depart-
ment's Angell Hall Playhouse at
8 p.m. Tuesday.
Walter Hacket,da former Uni-
versity student, adapted the story
for radio. The production will be
directed by Sherm Fillmore, Grad.
HAVE -YOU noticed? TV film
quality on kinescope shows is im-
proving? . . . University Teletour
has become "Michigan Report" on
WWJ-TV at 6 p.m. Saturday? ...
Detroit has a woman newscaster
(Loreen Babcock, on WJR at 4
p.m., Monday through Friday)?
*~ * *
Hear the latest morning head-{
lines from The Daily newsroom
at midnight Monday through Fri-
day over WHRV.

217 S. Main 9 Nickels Ar

,cad*

COLLINS

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

LIBERTY

AT MAYNARD

Speaker Tells
MysticBeliefs
The Islamic mystic believes that
all people share in common the
suffering brought on by war, fam-
ine, drouth and other evils of the
world, Prof. Louis Massignon of
the Sorbonne said yesterday.
Prof. Massignon is one of the
world's outstanding experts on Is-
lamic mysticism. During a semi-
nar held in the Rackham Bldg. he
described, in an illustrated talk,
some of the functions of the mys-
tic
The mystic is especially in-
terested in the rites of pilgrim-
age, the professoryexplained.
Whether he travels by camel or
airplane, he makes his pilgrim-
age in order to find his true
home.
The pilgrimage is the only phase
of Moslem worship that can be
done by proxy, he added.
Prof. Massignon is a Haskell
lecturer at the University of Chi-
cago and Columbia University this
year. He specializes in Sufism, an
Islamic order which acknowledges
no spiritual head.

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ANNUAL MID-SEASON

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10 Days-Get to this Sale E

You

will save plenty on each pair of Men's or

Women's New Fall Shoes you buy at this sale.

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10%/ to 20%/ off
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The holidays are coming so why not get
a new formal now to wear to Panhel Ball
and then save it for the Christmas parties?
This exquisite dance dress is of black nylon net,
over-printed in gold. The high-rise
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to 416 81
This is a real money-saving sale. The Shoes are from our regular stock.
None bought for sale purposes.
Save $2.00 to $3.00 a pair on New Fal Shoes
ifAMDNC R ~TEDY

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