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November 01, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1,1952

MM

Alger, Willa ms Give Programs
By HARRY LUNN 2) How do you plan to meet the increasing financial
Michigan's gubernatorial race has turned into a hot battle be- supported schools and universities?
veen incumbent Democratic Gov. G. Mennen Williams who is seeking 3) What remedies would you offer to prevent a r
s third straight term and the GOP challenger Fred M. Alger, Jr. who of riots in state penal institutions?
esently occupies the Secretary of State's office. 4) What is your position on compulsory state FEP(
Williams astounded state politicians in 1948 when he captured tary state FEPC?
e governor's position by a large margin in traditionally Republican 5) What changes, if any, would you suggest in the
.ichigan, but he caused even greater surprise when he won re-election tax structure?
1950. 6) Do you believe the Trucks Act is the best p
proach to the problem of Communism within the sta
WITH THE OUTCOME of the election in great doubt this year, what other legislation would you suggest?
le candidates have been covering the state flinging verbal barrages 7) Which reapportionment proposal do you favor?
)out state finances, the Jackson riots and reapportionment. 8) Do you favor immediate construction of the pr
In order to present a complete survey of the candidates' highway between Chicago. and Detroit? How would you
views, The Daily today prints the answers to the following list project?
of questions submitted to the two nominees: 9) What is the chief project you would like to see,
1) How do you propose to solve the deficit in state finances? during your term of office? *
* S* Sp 4« ,,

needs of state
eoccurrence
C? On volun-
existing state
possible ap-
ate? If not,
roposed super
i finance this
accomplished1
*

i

STUDENT PLAYERS:
Hit Musical'Brigadoon'
Revives Spectral Town

i

FRED M. ALGER, JR
.. GOP challenger
Report Ready-
On Complexity
Of Metropolis
(Continued from Page 1)
as the second most important
faith at 37 per cent. Only two
per cent of the population ex-
pressed no religious preference.
Forty-two per 'cent attend
church once a week.
Labor unions play a leading role
in social participation. A total of
30 per cent of the people who are
enrolled in any organization be-
long to labor groups.
Fourteen per cent of the popu-
lation has never belonged to any
organized social group.'
The report says, "It is clear that
the organizations which directly
reach the bulk of the Detroit pop-
ulation are churches, church-con-
nected groups. and labor unions."
IN EXPLORING the social re-
lationships among the populace
the report reaches the conclusion
that "even in a great metropolis
like Detroit family ties appear still
to-be most numerous."
The Detroit Area' Study is a
new research training program
at the- University, and the so-
ciology department feels it to
be so important that it has sub-
stituted participation ia the
program for the traditional mas-
ter's dissertation.
The group which worked with
leading Detroit civic organizations
hopes in the near future to make.
public information on educational
training and attitudes on Detroit,
political parties and political affil-
iations.
The program will continue in-
definitely. Next year's project will
focus on aspects of family life in a
metropolitan community.

Alger . .
A. First, call a halt to the prac-
tice of adding new, unnecessary
and expensive state services to the
sent structure.
B. Second, eliminate all present
services that are not necessary to
the well being of the state and
that have been added over the
years at the insistence of special
interests or selfish pressure groups.
C. Third, drastically tighten the
administration and enforcement of
present revenue measures.
D. Apply the result of such sav-
ing and increased revenue to gra-
dual reduction of deficits and fi-
nancing of such added operations
as may be necessary.
2.
See paragraph 1-D above.
3.
Place penal institutions under
trained penologists and remove
all political influence.
4.
Favor voluntary legislation.
5.
A drastic tightening of the ad-
ministration of present revenue
measures would be the first step.
Next, a complete study of our en-
tire tax structure by unbiased.
competent financial experts.
6.
The Trucks Act is sound. How-
ever, I believe that a continued
study of the problem is advisable.
Given proper control at the fed-
eral level, the problem of Com-
munism in Michigan will become
less acute State and Federal leg-
ilation; should follow the same
general pattern' with -each com-
pleting the other.
7.
I favor Proposal 3 in that is
provides proper balance and fol-
lows the pattern that has been
so successful in our Federal
structure.
8.
I am in favor of a super high-
way between Detroit and Chicago
with adequate connecting links
with other heavily populated areas
of our state. I prefer that all high-
way financing should come from
present highway revenues.

Williams ..
Adoption of a corporation pro-
fits tax.
2.
The additional funds from the
proceeds of a corporate profits
tax would balance our state bud-
get and help meet the increasing
needs of our. state supported
schools and universities.
3.
Construction of specialized
prison facilities for the treat-
ment of first offenders; increas-
ed appropriations to provide in-
creases in prison staffs to en-
able them to cope with a grow-
ing prison poulation; and more
emphasis on vocational and oth-
er training to rehabilitate pris-
oners.
4.
As Governor, I have recommend-
ed the adoption of compulsory
Fair Employment Practices legis-
lation to every regular session of
the Legislature. I will continue to
do everything in my power to per-
suade the Legislature to pass such
a bill.
5.
The experience of the past 20
years has amply demonstrated
that Communists and Communism
are a real and present danger. The'
Trucks Bill, while perhaps not
perfect in every detail, is a rea-
sonable effort to protect our es-
sential freedoms and for that rea-
son I signed it.
6.
I believe we should preserve the
present basic principle of our Con-
stitution that representation in
both Houses of the Legislature
should be according to population.
7.
Present state taxes are regres-
sive, 79 cents out of every dol-
lar of state revenues coming di-
rectly from consumers. Corpor-
ations account for only about
eight per cent of Michigan state

1 0 e#" * $

By JON SOBELOFF
A spectral village that comes to
life once every century provides
the setting for the Broadway hit
musical play "Brigadoon," which
will be presented here by the Stu-
dent Players, beginning Nov. 12.
Allan J. Lerner, who wrote the
book for the show, has said that
he wrote the happy ending first
and then worked backwards.
HIS FORMULA apparently has
proved immensely successful, for
the placid, cheerful and pleasant-
Both Parties
See Victory
In Congress
(Continued from Page 1)
are thinking hard about this elec-
tion andare willing to exercise an
independent judgement."
"We'll have a huge vote," he
noted, "and the bigger the vote
the better."
* * *
ONE REASON for the larger
potential vote is new industrial
communities such as Pittsfield
Village which have grown up in
the Second Congressional District
in recent years.
Republicans in the area do
not feel that it will endanger
their chances of victory.
Democrats, on the other hand,
look hopefully toward these areas
for the votes that might swing the
election.
"It is primarily a problem of get-
ting out the Democratic vote, and
we feel we can do it this time," a
volunteer worker emphasized.
ANOTHER HOTLY contested is-
sue in Washtenaw County is the
CountydCourthouse proposal, with
both sides confident of victory.
The issue cuts across party
lines, with Ann Arbor Republi-
cans and Democrats supporting
a "yes" vote.
Malcolm C. Taylor, Chairman
of the Ann Arbor Citizens Court-
house Committee, declared that
since the courthouse situation has
been "bungled since 1935, the peo-
ple are disgusted with objections
to the courthouse proposal and will
vote for it."
On the other hand, George
Handy, editor of the Ypsilanti
Daily Press, noted that a similar
proposal was defeated in 1950 be-
cause the suggested site was in-
adequate, and that the same thing
will happen again.

ly romantic tale of the Scottish
highlands ran almost a year on
Broadway while ticket takers tore
enough pasteboard to double the
show's backers' investment after
300 performances.
The story that captured the
hearts of sophisticated New
Yorkers takes place in the en-
chanted town of Brigadoon.
While the rest of the world
wears itself out, the. villagers of
Brigadoon exist in neighborly con-
tentment, emerging from their re-
mote corner of time to come to
life for one day every century.
When two American travelers
stumble upon the villagp, a tale of
faith and magical love follows,
leading to the happy ending.
EXPLAINING THE decision to
present "Brigadoon" here, Student
Players president Joseph Gadon,
'53, said, "Our function is to pre-
sent plays that have a universal
appeal-Broadway's best."
"This is one show which has a
magical charm that should cap-
ture everyone's imagination. We
expect that it should be just as
successful as last year's production
of Finian's Rainbow."
Brigadoon will run for four days,
Wednesday, Nov. 12 through Sat-
urday, Nov. 15. Orchestra seats at
$1.20 and balcony seats at 90 cents
will go on sale at the Lydia Men-
delssohn box office Monday, Nov.
10.

STAR CLEANERS
1213 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
DRY CLEANING SPECIALS
FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY
3 FOR THEPRICE OF2
SUITSo COATS. DRESSES@ PLAIN
$1.00 each or 3 for $2.00
COMBINATION OF EITHER
3 FOR THE PRICE OF 2
TROUSERS, SHIRTS, SWEATERS, SKIRTS
50c each or 3 for $1.00
COMBINATION OF EITHER
We feature 2 HOUR CLEANING
at Regular Price
READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

G. MENNEN WILLIAMS
*.. incumbent governor
* * *
revenues compared to 23 per
cent in the other 47 states.
The state tax structure should
be changed by adding more of the
principle of ability to pay, thus
lessening the regressive nature of
our present system. We should
seek a new tax source which will
raise the funds we need quickly
and simply, which will have a low
cost of collection, and which will
not compound the present inequi-
ties but rather add balance to our
present tax structure. A corporate
profits tax, replacing the present
corporate franchise tax, will ac-
complish these purposes most rea-
dily.
8.
Yes, but sufficient highway re-
venues are not now available. The
question of financing this and
similar super highways is current-
1Y being studied by a legislative
committee to determine where
they should be built and which of
them can be financed economical-
ly through tolls.
A balanced budget with ade-
quate funds for essential state ser-
vices.

11

_. 3

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Nov. 2-Everlasting Punishment.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and horidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
9:45 A.M.: Student Bible Study "Deuteronomy."
11:00 A.M.:' Church Worship "How Do You Get a
Better World?"
7:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild: Prof. Charles
Brassfield leads discussion on "God and the
Universe" in the Chapman Room.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday after the Game: Open House.
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with celebration of
Holy Communion. Sermon by the pastor, "The
Christian Citizen's Responsibility."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program. Talk by the pastor,
"Sex Problems in the Light of Scripture."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Rev. Henry J. Kuizenga, Minister
Rev. Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Rev. Wm. S. Baker, Student Minister
Sunday Morning Service: 9:00 and 11:00 'A.M.
Henry Kuizenga preaching, "The Over Flowing
Cup."
Sunday Morning 10:00: Student Bible Seminar.
Sunday Evening 7:00: Guild Meeting-Christian
Political Responsibility.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mrs. W. S. Bicknell, Parish Assistant
Mr. E. J. Schuss, Student Advisor
Miss Jane Townsend, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group and Church
School.
11:00 A. M.: Service of Worship:
Edward H. Redman preaching on:
"With Malice Toward None."
7:15 P.M.: Unitarian Students at the church.
Charade Party.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion with Choir (follow-
ed by Student Breakfast).
11:0 OA.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion. Sermon by Rev.
W. R. Schutze.
4:00 PM.: High School Club.
6:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club (University Stu-
dents) Speaker Miss Ames. Topic: Man's
Need and God's Answer.
Mid-Week: Wed. and Thurs. Holy Communion
followed by student breakfast, 7:00 A.M.
Friday, 12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, D.D.; Pastor
Phone 7622
Sunday-9:25 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services at the Center and at Trin-
ity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
7:00 P.M.: LSA Meeting - Film "Rebuilding
Berlin."
Tuesday--7:30 P.M.: "Teachings of the Various
Denominations."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Discussion Class, Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship: "Recognizing Right and
Wrong." Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. There will be
a movie' shown entitled, "We Hold These
Truths."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation rooms, open daily!t
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
10:00 A.M.: Bible School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship Service. Speaker:
Mr. G. J. Van Wylen "The Unjust Steward."
6:15 P.M.: Grace Bible Guild Supper.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service "Be Still and Know."
Wed. 8:00: Mid-week Prayer Service.
A*Friendly Church Where The Word Is Preached.

_ .

r'

4

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Sts.
Rev. George W. Barger, Minister
Sunday, November 2
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: Grasping Life's Nettles.
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Sunday School.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Dr. Leonard A. Parr, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Bible Session, Mayflower Room.
Prof. George Mendenhall: "The Contribution
of Archeology."
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "A Re-
ligion That Will Wear."
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M.: Professor Theodore Newcomb will

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