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October 29, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1952
Sig Eps Triumph;
Betas Down SAM
7-6 Win Over Kappa Sigma Gains
Semi-finals for Sig Eps in I-M Play

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIRES

TH IHGA AL PAETU

By DIANE MOWREY
Sigma Phi Epsilon entered the
social fraternity, football semi-
finals, by defeating Kappa Sigma
yesterday by a 7 to 6 score.
The first half of the Kappa Sig-
Sig Ep game was uneventful,
with neither team gaining much
ground, but in the second half of
play, Sig Ep Dave Davidsen tossed
10 yards to Tom Stone for a touch-
down. The extra point was made
on a pass from Tony Naylor to
Burwell "Bumpy" Jones.
KAPPA SIGMA retaliated with
a 30-yard, touchdown aerial from
Don Mitchell to Chuck Heimer-
; dinger, who made a diving catch.
The Kappa Sigs failed to tie up
the score when Mitchell faded
pack for the extra point pass and
slipped and fell.
Sigma Alpha Mu bowed to
Beta Theta Pi, 6-0, in another
first-place playoff. The -Betas
made the only score of the game
when Dick Fisher launched a
15-yard toss to Terry Iverson.
The Sammies vaunted passer,
Warren Wertheimer, never could
get an attack generated against
the Betas defense.
In the second-place playoffs,
Sigma Alpha Epsilon had a tie
ball game with Lambda Chi Al-
pha until the last five minutes of
play, when it got two points on
a safety.
* * *
LAMBDA CHI had sent Hal
Kruger back into the end zone to
pass but Kruger rushed hard, in-
tentionally grounded the ball. The
official ruled a safety for the
SAEs on the play, and Lambda
Chi played the rest of the game
under protest. IM officials rule
that the safety was good, how-
ever.
In another second-place play-
off game, Alpha Tau Omega
took an early lead over Chi Psi
and won, 13-6. Achilles Tara-
ches led the passing attack of
the ATOs, tossing to Jim Dreyer
and Jay Mills for touchdowns
and to Bill Munroe for the
extra point.
Chi Psi's only score came on a

pass from Bob Sabo to Russ
Johnson.
Sparked by the playing of Dick
Kline, Jack Levy, and Hank Good-
man, Zeta Beta Tau humbled Phi
Sigma Kappa by the score of 19
to 0 in the third-place playoffs.
M' Gridde's
Drill..to Stop
Illi*ni Passes
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan sent
his league-leading Wolverines
through a brisk two hour drill yes-
terday as the Michigan squad pre-
pared defenses to stop Illinois'
vaunted Tom O'Connell.
The Illinois aerial game, coun-
trary to all expectations, has far
surpassed the running attack.
Constant injuries have decimated
the running backs to such a de-
gree that at no time this season
have the Illini been at full
strength.
O'CONNELL has stepped into
the breach and with two capable
receivers in John "Rocky" Ryan
and Rex Smith he has given the
Orange and Blue a powerful aerial
game.
With pass defenders at a pre-
mium, a gloomy note was sound-
ed when a recheck of injuries
revealed that Don Oldham and
Stan Knickerbocker may miss
Saturday's encounter due to a
pulled back muscle and a
sprained ankle respectively.
The Michigan offense has been
exceedingly potent this season
judging from statistics released
yesterday. The Wolverines have
amassed an average of 359.2 yards
per game, the best offensive per-
formance since 1947 when the
"Magicians" of Fritz Crisler av-
eraged 412 yards per contest.
The Maize and Blue has been
rushing for an average of 224.3
yards and passing for 154.4 in the
five games played.
ROW products

liinois' Eliot
To Employ
New Attack
By The Associated Press
CHAMPAIGN -Illinois' varsity
scrimmaged against freshmen us-
ing Michigan plays and defenses
Tuesday as coach Ray Eliot pol-
ished up a new offensive unit.
Tom O'Connell directed the unit
at quarterback. New halfbacks
were Ken Swienton and ,Bud De-
Moss. Pete Bachouros filled in at
fullback for the injured Bill Tate.
Safetyman Al Brosky worked
out lightly for the first time since
he injured his back.
WISCONSIN
MADISON-Coach Ivy William-
son threw everything but an actual
scrimmage at his Wisconsin foot-
ball team yesterday in a rugged
workout that lasted nearly 21/2
hours.
Offensive blocking, which wasn't
up to snuff last Saturday as the
Badgers lost to UCLA, got a good
going over. The Wisconsin offense
worked on blocking and timing
against a strong reserve outfit.
OHIO STATE
COLUMBUS -Doug Goodsell,
Ohio State University back, Tues-
day earned himself a starting
linebacker spot for the Northwest-
ern tilt at Evanston Saturday.
Coach Woody Hayes was pleased
with Goodsell's performance in
yesterday's 40-minute defensive
scrimmage during a light snowfall.
NORTHWESTERN
EVANSTON -Northwestern's
defense excelled yesterday in a
rugged scrimmage against fresh-
man employing Ohio State plays.
. Tackles Tom Roche and Dick
Elrod and guard Ralph Jecha
stood out.
IOWA
IOWA CITY-Coach Forest Eva-
shevski gave his Iowa football
squad a long, hard workout behind
closed stadium gates Tuesday in
preparation for a Big Ten game
with Minnesota Saturday at Min-
neapolis.
Hawkeye defensive and off en-
sive teams scrimmaged freshman
squads using gopher formations.
MINNESOTA
MINNEAPOLIS - Minnesota's
Gophers appeared to be in high
spirits and hopeful for a victory
as they prepared Tuesday for their
Big Ten clash with Iowa Satur-
day. The contest will be Minne-
sota's homecoming.
The defense spent the practice
session working on Iowa rushing
and pass defense. The offensive
lineup concentrated largely on
Minnesota scoring plays.

DETROIT - (P) -The Detroit
Red Wings' front office, annoyed
by the Stanley Cup champions,
three - game losing streak, an-
nounced two player changes yes-
terday.
Defenseman Larry Zeidel and
utility forward Vic Stasiuk were
shipped to the Wings' Edmonton
farm club in the Western Hockey
League. Brought from Edmonton
to Detroit as replacements were
defenseman Bill Folk and right
wing Lou Jankowski.
* * *
THE DEFENSIVE change was
made as an aftermath of the three

road trip losses, most stunning of
which was the 9-0 defeat at Mon-
treal, worst in Detroit's history.
Folk, who gets his first real
chance after five years in the De-
troit system, is known as a heavier
body checker than Zeidel.
The offensive change was made
to secure more scoring punch.
Jankowski, 21, scored 125 points
two years ago in junior hockey at
Oshawa, Canada.
Folk got a previous four-game
tryout with the Wings and Jan-
kowski played in the final 1950-51
contest with the Wings.

It took a while for the nation's
grid experts to lift Michigan out
of the bottomless pit of unrated
football teams, but the Wolverines
are up with the big boys now.
This week's Associated Press
poll, representing the opinion of
121 football writers, rates the
Maize and Blue 15th in the coun-
try with 48 votes.
Another national pigskin poll,
which has as its board of selec-
tors some 35 coaches, puts Michi-
gan in 14th position with 14 votes.
The Wolverines great rivals,
Michigan State, still hold on to
the top spot in the AP tabulation,

but only one Western Conference
Team is placed over Michigan.
The Purdue Boilermakers, who
have shown themselves to be the
class of the Big Ten by virtue of
their impressive win over Illinois,
got one first place vote and 164
tallies for the eighth slot.
Here are the complete findings
of the AP pickers:

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Purdue (1) ...........
Kansas...............
Villanova......... .
California ............
Tennessee.........
Notre Dame ..... ....
Texas...........
MICHIGAN '..........
Virginia .........
Pennsylvania.......
Wisconsin.............
Alabama..............
Florida...............

164
138
134
99
91
63
58
48
39
26
19
18
16

Canadian Newcomers Folk,
Jankowski Join Red Wings

GETTING THERE:
Wolverines Advance in Grid Ratings

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Michigan State (38) ...1042
Maryland (32)........1016
Oklahoma (20).........850
Georgia Tech (7).....767
Southern Cal (7)......745
Duke (10)............688
UCLA (6)........... 605

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