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October 28, 1952 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1952-10-28

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RAGE SIB

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CAMPUS GOES REPUBLICAN:
Daily Polls Pick Losing Candidates

By JERRY HELMAN
As Maine goes, so goes the Uni-
versity, although the nation
doesn't.
A survey of Daily polls of the
student body and faculty members
showed that in every election since
1932," the University has gone
against the national trend in f a-
voring the Republican Party in
presidential elections.
* * *
PAST DAILY presidential sur-
veys have been complete with riots
and' demands for retractions.
In 1932, a formal balloting
was held by this paper in con-
junction with the Union in
which one-third of the students
and faculty voiced opinions.
The results were: Hoover-1851;
Roosevelt-880; Thomas (Socialist
Party) -516; Foster (Communist
Party) -40.
A group of student socialists
raided the Student Publications
Bldg. the next day and charged
that the poll was a "fraud." They
hinted that Republicans subsi-
dized the paper and threatened to
"stop the presses unless we get a
full retraction."
The charge was the result of a
prank played by a member of the
Young Republicans, who cast
four ballots'in an attempt to check
the vigilance of the voting booth's
guardians. He informed The Dai-
ly's managing editormof what he
had done and the mistake was
rectified.
$ome quick thinking on the part
of the editor, Frank Gilbreath (of
"Cheaper By the Dozen" fame)
avoided further trouble. He drew
line across the isle of the city
Asian Club
Established
Ont Campus
In the belief that East and West
should meet and exchange cul-
tures, an All Asian Association has
been formed on campus so that
students from Asia and America
may benefit from learning about
each other's customs and civiliza-
tions.
Last December students from
China, Japan, Ceylon, Pakistan,
Thialand, the Middle East, Burma,
Korea, Indonesia, the Philippines
and India met to sponsor the As-
sociation and to draw up a con-
stitution.
In explaining the need for
the association, B. V. Govin-
daraj, grad, organizer of the as-
sociation, said "Sometimes it is
not possible for students of one
country to satisfy their desire to
propagate the culture and civili-
zations of their respective coun-
tries."
The foreign students at the
University tend to live with
their respective countrymen, thus
snatching away a chance to know
or meet others." This obviously
nullifies the foreign travel expe-
rience that is supposed to be
gained by a trip abroad," he add-
ed.
Research Club
Hears Lecture
Miss Cora DuBois, Director of
Research at the Institute of Inter-
national Education, last night ad-
dressed the Women's Research
Club of the University, on the top-
ic: "arious Concepts of Culture
and Their Bearing on Problem
Solving."

Stressing the distinction between
the empirical study of individual
cultures, and the more abstract
study of their interrelationships,
Miss DuBois, said that more work
on the empirical level is neces-
sary before study can ascend to
the completely theoretical level.
Objectors Invited
To Meeting Today
All students interested in the
rights and position of conscien-
tious objectors are invited to at-
tend a meeting of the Fellowship
of Reconciliation from 7 to 8:30
p.m. today in the Wesleyan Lounge
of the Methodist Church.
Read Daily Classifieds

room and said that the rioters
were to go no farther. They didn't.
* * * .
COMMUNISM became an issue
in the '36 survey. Ina faculty poll,
Earl Browder, the Communist
Party candidate, received 10 votes.
When queried by a Detroit report-
er, Regent James O. Murfin said
he thought the 10 should be dis-
missed.
However, Regent Junius E.
Beal came to their defense by
maintaining that "it is a good
thing we do have some Commu-
nists here. It is up to our youth
and our intelligent men associ-
ated with youth to keep our
thinking progressive." Nothing
further came of the matter.
In a three day poll among stu-
dents, in which booths were set up
'in the Union and League, the GOP
candidate, Alf M. Landon, beat out
FDR by 26 votes.
Selection Test
Given To Aid
Drafted Men
Men interested in flying for the
U. S. Air Force if they are drafted
can obtain information from an
Air Force selection team starting
tomorrow, according to Lt. Col.
Samuel R. Beckley, professor of
air science and tactics.
The team will interview pros-
pective air men and furnish appli-
cations for a flying training eli-
gibility test from noon to 5:30 p.m.
tomorrow and every day through
next Tuesday except Saturday and
Sunday in Rm. 3K in the Union.
Favorable results on the test
give a two year qualification for
flight training. If an applicant is
drafted, he can show his test re-
sult and request placement in the
Air Force flight training program.
Lt. Col. Beckley emphasized
that taking the test might be par-
ticularly advantageous for non-
veteran men who are above the
freshmen level, and added that
there is no obligation involved for
those seeking information.

The results were: Landon-1,-
849; Roosevelt - 1,823; Thomas -
178; Browder-102.
Campus Democrats claimed a
moral victory, pointing to Hoov-
er's overwhelming victory in '32.
The results of the survey were
included in a nationwide poll of
colleges taken by The Prince-
tonian, which gave victory to
Roosevelt, 39,589 to 36.040 for Lan-
don.
THE POLLS during the elec-
tions of '40, '44 and '48 apparent-
ly caused little stir on campus and
no incidents.
In 1940, the survey was tak-
en during all-campus elections,
with Wendell Wilkie beating out
the third term seeking Roose-
velt, 1159-854. Norman Thomas
received 172 votes while Earl
Browder supporters numbered
only 52.
Thomas E. Dewey was victorious
in 1944, 781 to 559 for FDR, a 7-5
ratio majority with one-sixth of
the students voting. Since the
Communist Party was not on the
state ballot, votes for their can-
didate were not counted.
* * *
THE 1948 election appeared to
arouse little interest on campus.
Five Daily night editors on the
eve of election day stood on the
Diag for a half-hour arguing
loudly with one another about the
candidates and hardly drew an in-
quisitive stare from passing stu-
dents.
In a poll of the West Quad,
the only one taken on campus
that year, Dewey was favored on
54.5 per-cent of the 1350 ballots
cast, with President Truman
getting 20.9, Thomas 10, Wallace
7.5 and J. Strom Thurmond six
pex-cent of the total vote.
* * *
THE PRESENT GOP hopeful,
Dwight Eisenhower, is by far the
popular choice of students, win-
ning The Daily straw votes taken
during registration last spring and
this fall by a considerable margin.
A poll of faculty members will
be forthcoming late this week, and
if the trend holds true, Eisenhower
should be the popular choice.

Application
For Service
Test .Due
Selective Service officials have
set the deadline for submitting ap-.
plications for the Dec. 4 Selective
Service College Qualification Test
at midnight Nov. 1.
Students may obtain test appli-
cation blanks at their local draft
boards and should mail the com-
pleted applications to' Educational
Testing Service of Princeton, New
Jersey.
Students whose academic year
will end in January 1953 have
been urged to take the Dec. 4 test
so they will have a test score in
their cover sheets before their ac-
ademic year ends. At that time
their draft boards will reopen and
reconsider their cases to deter-
mine whether they should be de-
ferred as students.
The criteria for deferment as
an undergraduate student are ei-
ther a satisfactory score (70) on
the test or specified rank in class
(upper half of male freshman
class, upper two thirds of male
sophomore class or upper three
fourths of male junior class.)
However, the criteria are flex-
ible and standards may be raised
anytime necessary for manpower
demands.

Events of the Week
This calendar inaugurates a regular Tuesday feature of The
Daily. It has beencompiled for the purpose of acquainting the
student body with events of interest to the whole campus which
will occur in the coming week./
TUESDAY
SRA This I Believe Series-"Man in His Universe" by Dr. Ashley
Montagu 8:30 p.m. Rackham Lecture Hall.
WEDNESDAY
SL Meeting, 7:30 p.m., SL Building.
Stanley Quartet, 8:30 p.m. Rackham Lecture Hall.
THURSDAY
Speech department play, "The Shadow and the Rock," 8 p.m.,
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.

FRIDAY
Illinois Pep Rally 7:20 p.m. in front of the Union.
SL Cinema Guild movie, "Wilson." Three showings:
9:30 p.m. Architecture Auditorium.
Speech department play, "The Shadow and the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
SATURDAY
Football-Illinois (here at 2:00 p.m.)
Flashcard section last performance of the year.
SL Cinema Guild Movie, "Wilson," three showings:
9:30 p.m. Architecture Auditorium.

5:30, 7:15 and
Rock" 8 p.m

5:30, 7:15 and

INITIATION-Two members of Vulcans, senior engineering hon-
orary society, are led through the University steam tunnels as
part of their initiation.
Author Calls For Emphasis
On Spiritual, Reliuious Values
In a talk on "The Present Crisis Leyasmeyer based his speech,
and Its Solution" Karlis Leyas- largely on a book by Pitirim Sor-
meyer, European author and edi- okin, Dean of Harvard University,
tor, told a group of Inter-Guild called "The Crisis of Our Age."
Students last night that there is According to Dean Sorokin, the
too much emphasis today on "ma- most creative society is that in
terial values" as opposed to spir- which spiritual or what he calls
itual and religious ones. ideational values receive the most
emphasis.
French Alee tin gLeyasmeyer, who was born in
Russia and lived there for many
Le Cercle Francais will meet at years after the Communist Revo-
lution, told the religious-guild
8 p.m. tonight at the League. members that our most important
Skits, dancing and refreshments- means of fighting Communism is
will be part of the program. spiritually through Christianity.

Speech department play, "The Shadow and the Rock" $ p.m.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Autumn Nocturne-Tommy Dorsey, IM Bldg. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
SUNDAY
Japanese Festival, Tea Ceremony 3 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. West Gal-
lery, Alumni Memorial Hall.
SL Cinema Guild movie, "Wilson" three showings: 5:30, 7:Y'5
and 9:30 p.m. Architecture Auditorium.
Arts Theater, last showing of "Cross Purpose" 8:30 p.m. Arts
Theater Club.

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ICampus capers call for Coke
Win or lose, you'll get different
opinions when the gang gathers to
rehash the game. But on the question
of refreshment, everyone agrees-
you can't beat ice-cold Coca-Cola.

510 East William

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University

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