100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 26, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1952

THE MICINGAN DAILY

rAGE THEE

BUNDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1952 PAGE THREE

Balog, Knutson Spearhead
Rugged Michigan Defense

LONGEST WIN STREAK:
Spartans, Maryland Post Triumphs

(Continued from Page 1)
playing with a game leg, that
trainer Jim Hunt treated with
heat every time Minnesota had
the ball.
The next play saw Kress com-
plete another aerial to Topor for
a first down on the five. Then
Balzhiser made like Jack Weisen-
berger or Don Dufek with a plunge
to the 1. A second one like it and
4 Michigan led, 6-0. Russ Rescorla,
almost as automatic yesterday (he
missed a try for field goal later)
as Jim Brieske, kicked his first of
three extra points to make the,
margin 7-0.
THE NEXT two exchanges of
the ball, however, brought mem-
ories of a more recent vintage.
SGophers Skunked
MICHIGAN
LE-Perry, Dingman, Green
LT-Strozewski, Zatkoff, Walker
LG-Timm, Williams, Cachey, Van-
4 er Zeyde
C--O'Shaughnessy, Melchiori,
Wine, Drake
RG - Beison, Dugger, Matheson,
Rahrig
RT-Pederson, Balog, Geyer, Ben-
nett
i RE -Stanford, Topp, Knutson,
Dutter
QB-Topor, McDonald, Billings
LH-Kress, Oldham, Cline, Tink-
ham, Eyans
RH- Howell, Witherspoon, Bran-
off, Knickerbocker
FB-Balzhiser, Rescorla, LeClaire,
Baer
MINNESOTA
LE-McNamara, McElroy, Soltau
LT-Hansen, Almer, Zachary, Can-
akes, Andrus
LG-Anderson, Kauffmann
C-Prescott, Stamschror, Helgeson
RG--Coates, Lindgren, Heidenreich
RT-Drill, Hagemeister, Holz, Foss
RE--Rutford, French, Kapotas
QB-Swanson, Schmitt, Cappellet-
ti
LH--Giel, Klefsaas, Goode
RH-Meighen, Sullivan
FB - Baumgartner, Holme, Dar-
gis, Wallin
MICHIGAN 7 7 0 7 - 21
MINNESOTA 0 0 0 0 - 0
TOUCHDOWNS
MICHIGAN-Balzhiser (2), Topor
CONVERSIONS
MICHIGAN-Rescorla (3)
Time of Game: 2 Hours, 20 Minutes
Official Attendance: 70,858
Minnesota Michigan

back Dave Tinkham took the kick
on his own 39, returned eight
yards, and fumbled. Dave Drill
recovered for Minnesota, and the
Gophers were off-to the one yard
line.
GIEL, GIEL, Giel, Giel, Giel:
First he ran to the Michigan 34.
The next play he passed to quar-
terback Don Swanson for six more
yards. Then he tossed to Bob Mc-
Namara for a first down on the
five.
Fullback Mel Holme fumbled
for no gain. Giel was stopped
on the five. Swanson carried to
the two yard line. Giel was
snowed under at the one, and
the goal-line stand 'by Michigan
was reminiscent of the defen-
sive play of Len Ford, Al Wis-
tert, Dan Dworsky, and Dick
Kempthorn.
Only yestrday Roger Zatkoff and
Laurie LeClaire were the line-
backers, Art Walker and JimBa-
log the tackles, and Tim Green
and Gene Knutson the ends who
were the prime factors in holding
Minnesota to a total offense mark
of 135 yards-85 rushing and 50
passing.
ON ONLY ONE other occasion
did Minnesota threaten. On the
Michigan 27, Giel hit end Bob
Rutford with a scoring pass. But
officials called a. holding penalty
and the Gophers were set back to
the 41. They never came close
af ter that.I
Michigan meanwhile chalked
up markers in the second and
fourth periods. The Wolverines
rolled 54 yards and Balzhiser
scored his second touchdown,
this time on a plunge from three
yards out. The key play was a
third-down (with 15 yards to
go) dash around end by Tony
Branoff who literally ran over a
couple of Gophers on his way
from the Minnesota 37 to the 20.
In the final stanza Michigan
marched 80 yards to score. Topor
eased into the end zone standing
up from the one yard line. Once
again a power smash by Branoff
set up the touchdown. The Flint
freshman knocked down several
tacklers to move the ball from
the Minnesota 49 to the 20.
* * *
THE WOLVERINES had anoth-
er touchdown literally in their
grasp in the final period.
At the Minnesota nine, Topor
found himself trapped on third
down. He whirled away from
three defenders, and tossed to
Balzhiser in the end zone.
There wasn't a Gopher within
ten yards of the Wheaton, Ill.
junior. He dropped the perfect
pass.
Rescorla failed on a field goal
attempt the next play.
The duel between tailbacks Kress
and Giel came out exactly even,
statistically. Each accounted for
100 yards. Kress gained 64 rush-
ing on 16 carries.

By the Associated Press
EAST LANSING-Tousle-haired
Tom Yewcic, brightest sparkler in
Michigan State's 17-jewel back-
field, flung 61, 56 and 45-yard
touchdown passes yesterday to
push top-ranked Michigan State
from behind to a 34 to 7 victory
over previously unbeaten Penn
State.
Quarterback Yewcic, unperturb-
ed by a first period Penn State
touchdown, calmly pegged Michi-
gan State to its 20th straight vic-
tory - longest winning streak
among the nation's big colleges.
But it was a cast iron Spartan line
that gave him the protection he
needed.
THE SELLOUT homecoming
crowd of 51,162 saw the five foot,
11-inch Yewcic-a product of Co-
nemaugh, Pa.-throw to end Doug
Bobo and end Ellis Ducket for 45
and 56-yard touchdowns in the
second quarter. And they saw him
toss a 61-yard over-the-shoulder
scoring pass to Don McAuliffe in
the fourth period.
Michigan State Coach Biggie
Munn didn't get a chance to use
all of his 17 backfield stars be-
cause of Penn State's stubborn
play. Only half of them got to
run, right halfback Billy Wells
Big Ten Standings

scoring the third Michigan State
touchdown on a 26-yard reverse
around left end in the third per-
iod.
Late in the fourth period Mi-
chigan State's second string quar-
terback, Willie Thrower, another
Pennsylvania product, hurled 26
yards to Leroy Bolden for a touch-
down. Evan Slovac, who converted
the first four times, missed this
one.
Michigan State, No. 1 in the
weekly Associated Press poll, saw
its vaunted offensive crumpled in
Harriers Lose
In their first cross-country
of the season the Wolverine
Harriers ran a disappointing
third behind Michigan State,
Big Ten champ, and Penn State,
IC4A champ, in East Lansing.
The individual winner for the
Spartans was their Captain,
Jim Kepford. His time was a
swift 20.:06.6. The first finisher
for the Maize and Blue was
George Lynch, who placed fifth.
the first period by the Penn State
line. Not until the very end of the
first period did Michigan State
get beyond midfield.
MARYLAND 34, LSU 6
COLLEGE PARK, Md.-Three
touchdown passes by the incom-
parable quarterback Jack Scar-
bath took the early stubbornness
out of Louisiana State yesterday
as Maryland rolled to another 34-6
rout and its 21st game without de-
feat.

The aggressive visitors were giv-
ing the country's second ranked
team hard going on the ground be-
fore Scarbath unlimbered his
pitching arm.
The blond senior from Balti-
more completed 11 out of 18 passes
for 181 yards before leaving the
game with the score 34-0 after
eight minutes of the third quar-
ter.
DUKE 21, VIRGINIA 7
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.-
Duke's power-packed football ma-
chine, with sophomore Worth Lutz
in the driver's seat, reduced the
vaunted Virginia defense to a rub-
ble in two periods yesterday. The
final score, as Duke remained un-
defeated and untied, was 21 to 1.
But it could have been bigger if
the Blue Devils had continued to
play the way they did in the first
half. Virginia-unbeaten up to
this time-came back fighting aft-
er being three touchdowns behind,
got one of them back and made a
game of it right up to the end.
It was a fired-up, over-eager
Virginia team, playing before a
crowd of over 34,000, the largest
ever to see a football game In, the
state, that made a series of costly
mistakes early in the game. And
Duke, with the unperturbable 19
year-old Lutz maneuvering the
offense and big Ed Meadows and
Bobby Burrows leading the de-
fense, took advantage of every er-
ror.
LATE SCOUR
SOCCER
Oberlin 4. MICHIGAN 1

-Daily-Don Campbell
PAUL GIEL-Greatest of the Golden Gophers runs into Michigan's rock-ribbed defense as Laurie
LeClaire (39), Jim Balog (72) and Roger Zatkoff (70) combine to stop him for no gain in the third
quarter of yesterday's game.
UCLA Stops Badgers; Iowa Beats OSU

By the Associated Press
MADISON, Wis.-The bruising
Bruins of UCLA buried Wiscon-
sin's high-powered offense in the
turf of Camp Randall Stadium yes-
terday and cashed three breaks of
their own making to whip the
Badgers, 20-7 before an all-time
Grid Scores
MICHIGAN
MICHIGAN 21 Minnesota 0
Oklahoma A&M 21 Detroit 6
Brandeis 31 Wayne 19
Albion 41 Hillsdale 7
MIDWEST
Iowa 8 Ohio State 0
U.C.L.A. 20 Wisconsin 7
Purdue 40 Illinois 12
Northwestern 23 Indiana 13
Kentucky 14 Cincinnati 6
Miami (Ohio) 20 Ohio Univer-
sity 0

4.

high Camp Randall Stadium crowd
of 52,131.
The westerners' crushing line-
play throttled Wisconsin's run-
ning attack and when the Bad-
gers turned to the air the Uclan
secondary intercepted five passes
and converted two of them into
touchdowns,
* * *
BILL STITS, playini -a ble
time at right half, was the bright
light as the Bruins emphasized
their right to 8th national rank-
ing and prime consideration for
Rose Bowl honors. The 185-pound
junior intercepted two passes, run-
ning one of them 23 yards for the
final touchdown and halting a
Wisconsin drive with the other.
Moments earlier he had grabbed
a five-yard toss from Paul Cam-
eron for the Californians' second
score.
s s .
IOWA 8, OSU 0
IOWA CITY,. Iowa, Oct. 25-
Iowa touched off a homecoming
football bonfire under Ohio State
yesterday that sizzled the Buck-
eyes 8-0 in one of the most out-

standing surprises in Western Con-
ference history.
Approximately 45,000 fans
trudged into the stadium fully ex-
pecting to see Iowa lose its fifth
straight contest. In few Hawkeye
hearts was there more than deep
hope for a victory over the Buck-
eyes.
For the most part the predomi-
nantly Iowa crowd sat in almost
disbelief as they watched their
favorites pick up a 2-0 lead in the
second period on a safety while
holding Ohio State outside the
Iowa 27-yard line.
PURDUE 40, ILLINOIS 12,
CHAMPAIGN-Purdue's fired-
up Boilermakers ruined Illinois'
homecoming yesterday with a
rousing 40-12 victory over the
staggering Orange and Blue.
Dale Samuels sparked the Pur-
due attack with four touchdown
passes to tie a conference record.
The Illini lost their third straight
Big Ten game while the lads from
Lafayette rolled to their third con-
ference win and a tie with Michi-
gan for league leadership.

W
MICHIGAN ....3
Purdue ........3
Minnesota ......2
Wisconsin ......2
Ohio State .....2
Northwestern ...1
Indiana ........1
Iowa .. .........1
Illinois .........0

L
0
0
1
2
2
3
3
3

T
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.667
.667
.500
.333
.250
.250
.000

I

Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
W/C Tape &
Wire Recorders
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
MORRI LL'S
314 S.- State

O
O.''

PREMI ER THURSDAY...
U. OF M. DEPT. OF SPEECH
presents
"The Shadow and the Rock"
S.. A stirring drama by U. of M. graduate James Murdock '50
Oct. 30-31 and Nov. 1st Thurs.-Fri.-Sat., 8 P.M.

I

SPECIAL RATES for Students Thursday Nite... 50c

1

First Downs
Rushing Yardage
Passing Yardage
Passes Attempted
Passes Completed
Passes Intercepted
Punts
Punting Average
Fumbles Lost
Yards Penalized

10 22
85 265
50 118
21 20
8 8
1 2
9 6
33.4 37.5
3 4
30 45

Tickets 1.20, 90c, 60c
Box Office Opens Tomorrow 10 A.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

I

Phone
7177

open Saturday till 5 P.M
Except on Home Games

Minnesota got the kickoff, but the
Gophers' great tailback, Paul
Giel, was forced to quick kick on
second down to the Michigan 45.
Some of the frustrations of
last year must have welled up in
the minds of the faithful when
Howell reversed to the Maroon
and Gold 20 for a first downs
Howell and Balzhiser each gain-
ed another yard, but two in-
complete passes gave the Go-
phers the ball on downs.
After three relatively unsuccess-
ful plays, Giel punted again. Half-

-

II

I1

OUR MENU IS A

I$

SWEATER CLOSEOUTS
SLEEVELESS, all wool $5 Qauities, $195
small and medium ... while they last ...
PULLOVERS, with sleeves, all wool, to
$8.50 qualities. 36 to 46 . . . while $395
they last . .
HAARER & GOETZ
209 S. Main St. (Downtown)

PASSPORT TO

I

GRACIOUS DINING

rpI
,1

,,
:.w x 7i;:'r..
r
.:.y : 'rew.!'
=,
r

J

Mr w

I

lI

ONE STOP at
Packard Laundry
takes care of all 3: 1
and ast!

From the moment you glance at our menu,
you know that "let's eat out tonight" was
a wonderful idea! Our food is distinctive and

delicious, our service efficient,
trusive. You'll dine leisurely in

yet unob.
an atmos-

phere of graciousness where you are always
a welcome guest. Come in soon .. ,

LAUNDRY
'/2-Hour Service
r Using Maytag Automatic Washers

WAMM"

SEA FOODS
OUR SPECIALTY

. .

rI cI

hat wash clothes really clean! Serve
yourself, WASH & DRY in less than 1
hour. No risk of damage to your daintiest
washables.
DRY CLEANING
10% Discount
Cash and carry discount for expert, guar-
anteed work by Michigan Dry Clean-
ers Co.
SHIRT SERViCi

II

TO THE
?} GOLDEN APPLES

A

I

11

I I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan