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October 25, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PACE SL's

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 195

a
Y

Professor
To Receive
Law Citation
Prof. Paul G. Kauper of the Law
School is one of 20 alumni of Earl-
ham College, Ind., who will re-
ceive a citation for his record in
the field of law and for public serv-
ice.
The citation will be awarded at
the annual Homecoming dinner,
today as a climax .to a week-long
Convocation program emphasizing
the contributions of this college in
the fields of science and religion.
Among nationally known speak-
ers who will take part in the week's
program are: Charles Kettering,
automotive engineer; Sir Oliver
Fpranks, retiring British ambassa-
dor to the United States; Dr. Frank
Kellogg, chief, soil survey, United
States Department of Agriculture;
Dr. Wendell Stanley, noted bio-
chemist and Earlham graduate
and Dr. Walter Miles, distin-
guished Earlham graduate and
now professor of Psychology at
Yale University School of Medi-
cine.
Television Series
To Be Launched
University Television will launch
its new series of Teletours today
at 6 p.m.
Newly titled the "Michigan Re-
port," this behind-the-scenes pro-
gram will give TV viewers an in-
side look at the research of the
Laboratory of Vertebrate Biology.
Prof. Lee R. Dice, director of the
Institute of Human Biology, will
explain some of the experiments
conducted with mice showing how
basic research done on mice can
help human beings.
The Mendelian theory will be 11-
lustrated by mice which are the
product of crossbreeding. Other
topics to be discussed will be he-
redity, the advantages of color
protection, waltzing mice and their
abnormal behavior.

Teachers Present Cultures

* * * *

I

"The World is One," was the
theme of a program presented by
the International Teachers of
English last night in Rackham
Assembly Hall.
According to George E. Luther,
Assistant Coordinator of the Eng-
lish Institute, the program was
presented with the object of show-
ing a little of the culture of the
various countries which have
teachers studying English lang-
uage teaching methods at the
University. The teachers are sup-
ported by funds provided by the
Smith-Mundt bill and are spon-
sored by the U.S. Office of Edu-
cation.
The countries represented were:
Indonesia, The Netherlands, Bo-
livia, Brazil, Pakistan, Norway,
Turkey, Austria, Formosa, Leb-
anon, Indochina, Greece, and Ar-
gentina.
Staged in the form of a dream
of a young woman visiting a psy-
chiatrist, the show included danc-
ing, singing, a recitation from the
Koran, and a poem. A UN panel
discussion preceeded the program,
and following it there were re-
freshments and dancing.
The performers, all foreign Eng-
lish teachers, are enrolled in the
University's English Institute's
eight week method program of
teaching English to foreigners.
This program, conducted in Eng-
lish, is designed to assist teachers
in overcoming some of the spe-
cific difficulties that English offers
various language groups.
Another aspect of the Insti-
tute's program is an orientation
setup, designed to give teachers
as broad a view of American life
as is possible in the short time
they are here.
Medical Society
Sponsors Course
Twenty-five medical technolo-
gists are scheduled to attend a
course on hematology to be held at
the University's Simpson Memor-
ial Institute, Oct. 27-31.

Traditional
Brown Jug
Fight Today
(Continued from Page 1)
Victor Vaughan captured first
place among the woman entries.
* * .
THE MICHIGAN Marching
Band will compete for half-time
laurals with the 140 member
strong Minnesota Band. Accom-
panying the bandmen from the
northlands is a 30 member Girls'
Pop Band.
A repeat performance of the
popular St. Louis Blues num-
ber will highlight the Michigan
Band's pre-game production.
During the intermission the
band will take the field for a
highstepping routine centered
around the theme of "There's
No Business Like Show Busi-
ness."
Every available police officer in
the city has been detailed to the
game to help combat the huge
crowds. In addition, about 50 state
troopers and 30 state police cars
will team up with 18 sheriff's of-
ficers and the city police to aid
the direction of traffic.
No parking signs have been
posted on streets adjacent to the
Stadium for a 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
period. The State Police airplane
is being employed to direct ground
cars to specially congested high-
way areas. The post-game traffic
is expected to be slightly smaller
because of activities in town.
Roedel Elected
Alumni Director
A new director of the University
Alumni Association was elected
yesterday by the board of directors
of the Alumni Association.
Andrew Roedel, jr., of Cheyenne,
Wyo., was selected to replace re-
tiring director Henry Luthe of Des
Moines, Iowa, at the opening ses-
sion of the board meeting yester-
day in the Michigan Union.

GRID INTEREST LOW-1898:
'U' Begs Students To Attend Games

De-emphasis of college football
apparently wasn't much of a prob- I
lem at Michigan around the turn
of the century.
On the contrary, in 1898, stu-
dent interest was so low that they
had to be begged to go to the
games.
That was the year when the
University's enrollment was ap-
proximately 3,500 students. Newly
constructed football bleachers held
7,000 persons. Northwestern Uni-
versity and Ohio's' Miami Univer-
sity seriously considered dropping
football because of a couple of
broken collarbones. And the Wol-
verines were in the middle of a
winning year under coach "Dutch"
Ferbert.
* * *
BUT IN Ann Arbor, students
didn't seem to know - or care
about football.
In an issue of The Daily, Oct.
21, 1898 a plea was issued to
students to take more interest in
the games. Signed by two offi-
cers of the Athletic Association,
it began: "On behalf of the Ath-
letic Association we wish to
make an appeal to the student
body . . . "Turn out to the re-
maining games."

The article pointed out that the
Association was in serious finan-
cial condition because students
who had signed up to buy tickets
had not done so. A note for a
considerable sum of money was
falling due within four days and
the Association did not have the
money to pay for it.
"We appeal to you, for the sake
of our good name," it concluded,
"to aid ,us by paying the sub-
scriptions, atending the games or
purchasing association tickets. In

fairness to our loyal football team
you should not miss another game.
By all means attend the Notre
Dame game and help cheer Mi-
chigan on to victory."
But although interest picked up
and fans jammed the field to see
the Michigan team wind up a tri-
umphant "Champions of the West"
season, the Athletic Association
was still in bad shape. They were
finally forced to sponsor a, dance
after the season ended to pay off
their debts.

Big Selection of
BLANKETS $10 and up
Ulrich's Bookstore

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

-Daily-Alan Reid
NATIVE DANCE - An Indonesian teacher performs before a
Rackham audience in a program presented by the International
Teachers of English. All the performers are enrolled in the
University English Institute.
CinemaGuild Film Continues

11 ii

I

0

Ben Hecht's "Spector of the
Rose," the Student Legislature
Cinema Guild film, continues to-
day and tomorrow at 5:30, 7:30
and 9:30 p.m. in Architecture Au-
ditorium.
The picture, a conscientious at-
tempt to deviate from the normal
path of commercial films, deals
with the story of an innocent

young ballerina's devotion to a
mad, murderousrdancing genuis.
Choreography for the film was
done by Tamara Geva, music by
George Antheil.
A Charlie Chaplin Comedy,
"One A.M." is also included on the
program. Admission is fifty cents
at the door.

i

DON'T

MISS*...

Your Homecoming Dance

10r1

/i

"-
IC

A A
CA NAint

TONIGHT

- - feafuring - -
The Orchestra
of DON BARI
-i--and the---
Piano Artistry
of HAL SINGER

/,

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Oct. 26-Probation after Death.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
9:45 A.M.: Student Bible Class "Numbers."
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship, "The Awakening
Giant."
7:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild: Student Panel,
Missions Outmoded.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday, 4:30: Open House after Game.
Sunday, 10:30: Service, with sermon by the pastor,
"Jewels of the Reformation."
Sunday, 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper. Program at 6:20, Student-led
Reformation Program.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Rev. Henry J. Kuizenga, Minister
Rev. Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Rev. Wm. S. Baker, Student Minister
Sunday Morning Service: 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
Henry Kuizenga preaching, "The Protestant
Principle."
Sunday Morning 10:00: Student Bible Seminar.
Sunday Evening 7:00 there will be an informal tea
for Dr. and Mrs. William Baker. Both students
and church members are invited to the tea
which will be held in the Student Lounge at
the church.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mrs. W. S. Bicknell, Parish Assistant
Mr. E. J. Schuss, Student Advisor
Miss Jane Townsend, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group and Church
School.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship: Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching on: "The Church and Fam-
ily Life."
12:00: Coffee Hour.
6:00 P.M.: Unitarian Junior High Group.
7:15 P.M.: Informal gathering of students to dis-
cuss Patton Lecture.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder,.D.D., Pastor
Phone 7622
Sunday-9:25 A.M.: Bible Class.
10:30 A.M.: Services at the Center and at Trin-
ity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
7:00 P.M.: LSA Meeting-Speaker, Prof. Paul
Kauper.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M.: "Teachings of the Various
Denominations."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wongdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Discussion Class, Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "The Law of Forgiveness,"
Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Mr. Albert
G. Watson, Executive Secretary of the Midwest
Fellowship of Reconciliation will speak on "Be-
ing Reconcilers in an Unreconciled World."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2.1121
10:00 A.M.: Bible School.
11:00 A.M.: "The Man at the Door."
Dr. Merrill C. Tenney of Wheaton College.
7:30 P.M.: "Light and Darkness."
Wednesday, 8:00: Mid-Week Prayer Service.
A Friendly Church Where The Word Is Preached.

a

4

9 to 12
*
INFORMAL
$2 per Couple

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
State and E. William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister
Harold Haugh, Choir Director
Howard Chase, Organist

CHURCH

10:00 A.M.: Bible Session, Mayflower Room. Dr.
Frank Huntly, "The Bible & English Literature"
10:45 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "Shall
We Give the Ants a Chance?"
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES GUILD
7:00 P.M.: Barker Rossman, National Student
Work Director, Disciples Church: "Christian
Collegians Contend With The Campus."
Meeting in the Congregational Church.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Press, "Maintaining and Sharing a Vital Faith."
8:00 P.M.: Union Reformaiion Day Service.
Sermon by the Rev. Henry Kuizenga.
The Student Guild will meet at the Church at 7:45
P.M. and attend the service.

+ .{.4t
'f ,t

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tapoon Sts.
Rev. George W. Barger, Minister
Sunday, October 26
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "What
Is God Doing?" by Parker Rossman, National
Disciples Student Work Director.

I

I -r'5 11 II * vi'

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL

11

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