100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 21, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIx

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1952

CONSERVATIVE ALUMS?
Snerdians Root for Michigan

Chest Drive

s - - s

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
Daily Associate Editor
Alumni are often considered to
be conservative people.
And their associations are sup-
posed to be limited to ex-Univer-
sity students.
But the Mortimer Snerd Foun-
dation of Detroit doesn't go by the
book.
IT'S MEMBERS, all male em-
ployees of a brassware company,
are joined together for the one
purpose of having a good time one
weekend a year. They don't have
to be University people, either, as
long as they are willing to root for
the Wolverines during the foot-
ball season.
They have just completed
their fourteenth annual success-
ful tour of operation, having
whopped it up with the best of
them fast weekend. in Chicago.
The Snerdians hold one con-
clave a year at any game which is
"overnight from Detroit." A strict-
ly male enterprise, they leave their
wives at home "where they be-
long."
FIFTY STRONG this year, the
men, who range in age from 60 to
21 years old, claim that they were
"the loudest bunch; without a
doubt" at the game.
Those who traveled on the same
train from Chicago with theh'i
Sunday are convinced their claim
is probably true.
Ensconsed in a car located
conveniently just before the Club
car, the carousing crew greeted
all comers with rounds of songs,
cheers, smiles and raised mugs.
Female visitors received an es-
cort, armed with a siren, to ma-
neuver them through the throng.
..GOING ON the motto "No Snide
a Snerd, No Snerd a Snob," the
organization 'has grown from a
crew of 10 who first piled into two

Nears Goal
In SixthDay
At the end of the sixth day of
the Community Chest Campaign,
62.66 per cent of the goal, or
$101,824 has been collected.
The University, the largest con-
tributing unit, which includes both
the University proper and the
University Hospital, has reported
60.8 per cent of their $37,177 goal.
This amounts to $22,597.19.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY proper has
collected 73.25 per cent of its goal
while the Hospital has reported
34.94 per cent collected.
The inclusive residential drive
which solicited donations from
Ann Arbor residents reports
89.74 per cent or $28,381.54 of
its mark already collected.
Percentagewise, the Ann Arbor
Utilities leads the drive, having
collected 97.54 per cent of its total.
Next in line is the division of Na-
tional Corperations which reports
91 per cent of its goal.
"With four more days of the
Drive left, if the 10 per cent per
day pace continues, the goal will
be reached by Friday noon," Mrs.
Cecilia Craig, chairman of' the
drive, said.
"This drive is already more than
$20,000 ahead of last year's cam-
paign, and things are looking
good," commented Mrs. Craig.
In the past, because of slow re-
turn, the drive has had to be ex-
tended, but this year officials
promise that there will be no ex-
tension.
"Generally, the biggest surge of
giving has occurred during the end
of the drive. If this happens the
drive will be way over the goal,"
Mrs. Craig added.

SECOND IN SERIES:
Editor To Give Lecture
On Campaign Reporting

Basil L. Walters, executive edi-
tor of the Knight newspapers, will
speak on "Administering Presi-
dential Campaign News" at 3 p.m.
tomorrow in Rackham Ampithea-
ter.
The speech will be the second in
the journalism department's series

of University lectures in journ-
alism.
Walters has been a newspaper
mah for more than 27 years, start-
ing as a reporter for the Rich-
mond Palladium. He later served
as telegraph editor for the In-
dianapolis Star and Milwaukee
Journal, after which he became
managing editor of the Des Moines
Register and Tribune.
Following Walter's speech an in-
formal coffee hour will be held
for the speaker in the journalism
department's offices in Mason
Hall. The coffee hour will be open
to the public.

T

II

r

-Daily-Stu Ross
But Martha, all the boys are going.. .

41

cars for the now traditional joy
ride, the funsters group grew grad-
ually to fill a bus and finally,
flowed into a railroad car.
And, according to their men-
tors, they get gayer and more
impressed with Michigan foot-
ball every year.
"We're convinced that Michigan
will go to the Rose Bowl this year,"
they claim. "There can't be any
two ways about it."
Will they go along? At least
some of them will.
"A Snerder is never too busy-
at least some of us won't be," they
maintain. "Besides, we're such a
good cheering section."

City Raises
Property Tax
A property tax increase of $2.30
more per $1,000 of assessed valua-
tion over the 1951 rate was an-
nounced yesterday for Ann Arbor
by City Assessor Curt H. Will.
Basing the new tax rate on the
county Board of Supervisors ap-
portionment of the tax load, Will
said the total tax on each $1,000
of valuation in Ann Arbor for
1952 will be $38.78.

f

i
A
ti

LOWEST INCOME:
Indonesian Author Reveals
Country's Economic Plight
Q

By MARK READER
"Our main problem is not relig-
ious, but economic," Hafi Abdul
Malik Karim Amarulhah, leading
Indonesian religious author and
advisor in the Ministry of Relig-
ious Affairs, claimed last Satur-
day.
"Illiteracy, starvation, and the
need for economic help from any
source are the problems which
confront the Indonesian govern-
ment," he continued.
HAMKA, as he prefers to be
called, pointed out that his people
have the ignominious distinction
of having the lowest annual in-
come per person in the world.
"Many of our troubles can be
traced to the Dutch influence in
our country. Destruction of prop-
erty was carried on equally by
the Dutch and the Japanese in
their occupations of Indonesia,
and this has lead to the depress-
ed standard of living of the peo-
ple."
When questioned as to the com-
munist revolution now ,raging in
the country, Hamka, who speaks
little English and relies on an in-
terpreter, said that the commu-
nists first opposed religion in the
state but now do not openly at-
tack it. "The communists will not
enter through the religious door,
but they may gain power through
the economic door," he pointed
out.
WHIEN QUESTIONED about the
differences between the United
States and his country, Hamka
commented on the separation of
church and state here, a situa-
tion which does not exist in In-,
donesia. However, religious faith
has no bearing on a man's influ-
ence in public life. "Government
position is not based on religion
or tendency bit on capacity. Our
constitution recognizes all reli-
gions which profess the belief in
one God."
U' Instructor Will
Give Organ Recital
Mrs. Marilyn Mason Brown, in-
structor in organ at the University
will play a recital Oct. 27 in" Bing-
hamton, N. Y.
Mrs. Brown returned to the cam-
pus this fall after a year of teach-
ing and studying in New York
City.
TYPEWRITERS

I

TUESDAY'S SPECIAL
Corduroy Sport Shirts
TODAY ONLY
$6.95 VALUES
$556
Your choice of any corduroy
sport shirt in stock. Colors-
yellow, blue, green, red, teat,
brown, grey, maroon, also in
fancy checks. All sizes.
RABID ~lIJILIR
"Where the Good Clothes Come Frosm"
119 S. Main St., Ann Arbor
Open 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. Daily

.'

I

-J

p..

a

I

AUTHOR HAMKA
... tells of economic troubles
s s W
The factors which have most
influenced Hamka's opinions on
American society are the stress on
technology and organization.
"Such things in Indonesia are
virtually unknown," he concluded.

and Accessory Organs not Adversely
Affected by Smoking Chesterfields

.

i

Brand New Publishers Remainders
All Subjects - Published at $2, $2.50, $3 and $5.00
CHOICE..' .59c...2 for $1
U LRICH'S. . .Ann Arbor's Busy Book Store
There's lots of excitement
around the dance floor-greeting
old friends, making new ones.
Part of the fun of campus parties
is the pause to enjoy a Coke.
It's delicious... refreshing, too.
campusj

A responsible consulting organization has
reported the results of a continuing study by a
competent medical specialist and his staff on the
effects of smoking Chesterfield cigarettes.
A group of people from various walks of life
was organized to smoke only Chesterfields. For six
months this group of men and women smoked their
normal amount of Chesterfields - 10 to 40 a day.
45% of the group have smoked Chesterfields con-
tinually from one to thirty years for an average of
10 years each.
At the beginning and at the end of the six-
months period each smoker was given a thorough
R W YOUR DEALER
FRCHESTERFIELD- -
EER WAY Y OU T-x-'
LIKE 'EM "___ ~,

examination, including

X-ray pictures, by the

medical specialist and his assistants. The exam-
ination covered the sinuses as well as the nose,
ears and throat.
The medical specialist, after a thorough exam-
ination of every member of the group, stated:
'It is my opinion that the ears, nose, throat and
accessory organs of all participating subjects ex-
amined by me were not adversely 'affected in the
six-months period by smoking the cigarettes
provided."A

I

e.

_ =_-
.: - _-
_ - _ . .:.
"-
= _-- .-
"
_.
. _ ..
%E {
:1-N:G = SI°Z-E=7
.RFTTF 'C

/CONTAINS TOBACCOS
OF BETTER QUALITY &
HIGHER PRICE THAN ANY
l OTHER KING-SIZE
CIGARETTE

IF

i

mm

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan