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October 19, 1952 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-19

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b

PAGE EIGHT

*

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1952

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
College Paper Editors
Lose Pay, Draw Blasts

Survey Points Up GOP
Need of Independent Vote

Wolverines
WiCldcats

Chew
atEvc

Up
inston.

By JAN WINN
Things looked tough all over for
college newspapers last week.
University of Wisconsin's Daily
Cardinal has lost an editor
through action by its board of
control.
The board, after an investigar-
tion of the weak financial struc-
ture of the Cardinal, decided, as
an "ecopomy measure" to com-
pletely cut out the salary of Exe-
cutive Editor Jerry Schecter. This
action, taken over the vigorous
protests of the editor-in-chief
forced Schecter to resign from the
paper because of his self-support-
ing financial position.
An offer made by the editor-in-
chief and business managers to
take salary cuts so that the editor
could keep his position was refus-
ed by the board.
SARA WOODS, editor of the
University of Oklahoma daily re-
cently went "corruption hunting'
in the student governing body
After decrying the student elec-
tions as "rotten, stinking and fil
thy," she found the Student Sen-
ate "fierciy attempting to stifle m
when I was writing nasty editorials
about it." Miss Wood added, "My
life was even threhtened."
Another editor, from a small
eastern college, had to face the
wrath of the president's office

when she took a blast at the ad-
ministration.
On the issue of six students re-
ceiving reprimands for drinking
she wrote: "A lot the school has
to holler about student drinking
when the school owns shares in a
tavern and when it goes around
soliciting funds from local pubs."
She was warned to keep under
- control the "impetuosity of her
youth."
* * *
THE Interfraternity Council at
Augustana College last week re-
fused to allow the student news-
paper to cover its meetings.
"I don't think that proceed-
ings of the Council should be
open to the public, as they would
r be if a reporter were allowed to
. attend," said a Council spokes-
man. "Fraternities are secret or-
ganizations - their business is
not the business of the campus,"
he added.
The Augustana Observer com-
mented: "We have no desire to
. spy on anyone ... it. is with great
- disappointment that we bow to
- the wisdom of the Grecian Sages."

In a study of "Independents" in
the voting population, recently
completed by the University Sur-
vey Research Center, indications
were that the Republicans must
gain a much larger segment of
the independent vote than the
Democrats if they are to win in
November.
The study, prepared by Prof.
Samuel J. Eldersveld, of the polit-
ical science department was based
on a nation-wide sampling of the
1948 electorate.
ACCORDING to estimates made
in the study thenindependent vote
is more than one-third of the po-
Student Players
Issue Tryout Call
Student Players has .issued a
tryout call for three male speaking
parts in their Nov. 12-15 produc-
tion of "Brigadoon."
Those interested in applying for
the roles will be interviewed at
7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the League.
No acting experience is necessary
according to Joseph Gadon, '53,
president of the Student Players.

tential electorate. Of these two-
thirds E.re accessible to partisan
appeals and vote regularly.
Dividing the independent vot-
ers into seven categories accord-
ing to how accessible they are to
political appeals, the survey in-
dicated that the Republicans
must reach the less accessible to
secure the coming election.
Figures from the survey showed
that the large bulk of GOP votes
in 1948 came from two groups:
definite Republicans who always
vote and independents with Re-
publican sympathies who always
vote.
The survey cited the failure of
the Republicans to gain the votes
of the independents who tend Re-
publican but who vote frequently.
This group along with the other
less accessible groups, that is
blocks of voters who remain apa-
thetic to political appeal and al-
most never vote, must be secured
for the Republican candidates.
The study pointed up the fact
that the 1948 election may well
have been decided for the Demo-
crats by their successes in getting
out these less accessible groups of
independent voters.

I1

Students Hold
Indian Festival
Of New Year
The India Students Association
and representatives of interna-
tional and cultural clubs on cam-
pus last night celebrated Diwali,
the Indian New Year, with tradi-
tional dances and songs at Lane
Hall.
The nostalgic atmosphere which
accompanied the singing of the
Indian national anthem soon gave
way to a festive welcoming cere-
mony for the New Year. The lively
entertainment in the perfumed,
tapestry-hung Lane Hall Auditor-
ium recalled to many of the stu-
dents the celebrations in their na-
tive country.
THE PROGRAM began with a
dance performed by Devon Stev-
ens, Spec, representing the myth
of Diwali, known as "The Festival
of Lights" because of the many
candles and lights which are hung
around the buildings on this day
in India.
Representatives from several
countries and campus groups
sang folk and popular songs
from India, France, Spain, and
the United States.
Members of the Philippine Stu-
dents Association performed a na-
tive dance popular in their own
country, while an Indian song was
played on a piercing reed instru-
ment belonging to one of the In-
dian students.
A scene depicting a French side-
walk cafe was presented by mem-
bers of Le Cercle 'Francais. Also
featured on the program was a
Japanese dance representing the
coming of the new year.

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A
DAILY
PHOTO.
FEATURE
Pictures by
Jack Bergstrom

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