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October 17, 1952 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1952

_

iEDLES DOCTORED:
University Hospital Processes Hypos

he processing of hypodermic
dles is a business by itself at the
versity Hospital.
'nike many smaller institu-
s, needles are not sterilized and
ected by nurses at the Hospi-
Instead all cleaning, repairing
sharpening is done in one
e inside the building-at the
tral Supply department on the
and. floor.
staff of six persons is kept
y full time processing the
usands of needles used each
. Recently, during a two month
od, 8,000 dozen were put
,ugh the department. This
Lid average out to more than
'0 a day.
FTER EACH use in the wards,
needles are sent to the Central
ply where they are immediately
hed. The bugs, or large ends
ch attach on to the syringes,
cleaned out with cotton. Then
kers inspect them for burs, or
ied over ends, and dullness.
r
Needles with points which are
flled or broken are sent to Mrs.
,ances Terry, whose job it is to
arpen and repair. Using sand-
me grinders, a buffer and a
agnifying glass, Mrs. Terry'
n, on a normal day, turn out
out 800 needles.
'hen, after three preliminary
hings, the hypodermic needles
put into constricted glass test
es which are sealed with sheet-
sorted according to size and
through a pressure steam ster-

'U' HOSPITAL EMPLOYEE SHARPENS HYPODERMIC NEEDLE
HistoricalryDiary Display Tells
Details of .Early Michigan Life,

Many interesting details of the
history of the University and of
Michigan are revealed in the dis-
play of diaries of formerly promi-
nent Michigan people at the Mich-

City Voting
Instruction
Plan Set Up
City election officials are ready
to launch an extensive voting ma-
chine instruction program next,
week as preparations for the Nov.
3 election enter their final stage.
Five of the machines will be set
up at the beginning of next week
for demonstration and 15,000 in-
struction sheets, on the operation
of the machine, will be distribut-
ed throughout the city.
* * *
WITH 23,671 voters registered,
City Clerk Fred Looker emphasized
the necessity of voters knowing
how to operate the machine when
they go to the poll.
Looker pointed out that state
law permits a voter only one
minute inside the booth to cast
his vote. "With a knowledge of
the procedure of the machine a
voter should be able to cast his
ballot in about 30 seconds," he
said.
"In order to give everybody
ample time, however, we are al-
lowing voters two minutes inside
the booth," Looker continued.
The demonstration machines
are being set up at City Hall. Re-
publican and Democratic Head-
quarters,the Dunbar Civic Center
and a location on State Street
which has not been determined.
OPERATORS will be stationed
with the machines to instruct vot-
ers. Taking into considei'ation the
lengthy slate of candidates and
the importance of the election, of-
ficials expressed hope that all vot-
ers would avail themselves of the
'instruction opportunity if they
have any doubts concerning the
machines' operation.
The instruction sheets will be
distributed next week by the Boy
Scouts, local service clubs and the
League of Women Voters. On the
sheet will be a reduced picture of
instruction ballots.
Polling places will be open from
7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on election day.
Registration is up about 5,000 over
the 1948 presidential election,
Looker pointed out, and so urged
voters to visit polling places dur-
ing slack hours.
WFUM To Change
Frequency Nov. 1
The University radio station in
Flint, WFUTM-FM, will change to
a nef frequency Nov. 1 to avoid
further interference with televi-
sion reception in that area, Wal-
do Abbot, Broadcasting Service di-
rector, announced.
The new frequency, will be 107.1
megacycles FM. The station cur-
renctly is operating on 89.7 meg-
acycles FM.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

View for the EndZones

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4

Band

Day a Birdseye

After this final sterilization igan Historial Collection, Rm. 166,
ocess, they are taken back to Rackham Bldg. I
e Central Supply storeroom and Among the diaries are those of
pt until requisitioned by the former University President James
ospital's various wards. B. Angell and his wife. President
of the University from 1871 to
1907, Angell was appointed "min-
Jus1 TOe hers ister plenipotentiary and envoy
o Ht extraordinary" to China in 1880.
.o Hold* *. *
DURING HIS STAY in China
Music teachers from all over the he was head of a commission
ate will convene in Grand Rapids which dealt with Chinese immigra-
day for the 67th annual fall con- tion to the United States. In his
ntion of the Michigan Music diary Angell wrote of the last
eachers Association. meeting between the United States
Several University students will and Chinese delegations when
rticipate 'in the musical pro- there appeared to be no solution
ams. / to the immigration dispute. After
Clyde Vroman, former professor an hour's delay, he wrote, a set-
music education, and Prof. H. tlement was finally reached.
Dwell of the music school, execu- It was under Angell's guid-
ve secretary of the Michigan Mu- ance, . after his return from
c Teachers will represent the s China, that the University be-
rilversity. gan encouraging Oriental stu-
4.
ON SATURDAY NIGHT
It's Topflight .. .
DANCING
at the Union ballroom... 9-12

dents to study here. Included in
the exhibit is a picture of Angell
with some early Chinese stu-
dents at the .University.
The diaries of Mrs. Angell, writ-
ten on the blank pages of blue
books used by her husband's stu-
dents, tell of the life of the faculty
wives at the turn of the century..
ALSO ON display are the jour-
nals of two Civil War soldiers from
Michigan, Orlando E. Carpenter
and Charles B. Haydon.
Carpenter relates the pursuit
and capture of Jefferson Davis,
President of the Confederacy,
while Haydon humorously con-
trasts the appearances of Presi-
dent Lincoln and Gen. McClellan
on horseback at the Grand Review
of Nov. 21, 1861.
The diary of former State Su-
preme Justice Thomas McIntyre
Cooley tells of the difficulties
Cooley encountered as the first
Chairman of the Interstate Com-
merce Commission in 1887.
The exhibit is open to all in-
terested students.
Williams Lecture
OCn Genetics Set.
Biochemical genetics and hu-
man nature will be discussed in
the Rackham Amphitheatre at
4:15 p.m. Tuesday by Dr. Roger
J. Williams, director of the Bio-
chemical Institute of the Univer-
sity of Texas.
Sponsors are the University's
Institute of Human Biology and
Department of Biological Chem-
istry.

MORE THAN 6,000 HIGH SCHOOL MUSICIANS PACKED THE FIELD OF MICHIGAN STADIUM FOR ANNUAL BAND DAY

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FRIDAY, OCT. 17, THROUGH SATURDAY, OCT.

25

NOTED COMPOSER PAUL YODER CONDUCTED THIS MAJORETTE STRUTTED HER STUFF

00
Values to 8.95

GIRLS! Here is a sale not one of you can
afford to pass up. 785 pair to choose from
in a wonderful selection of this season's
best sellers. Included in this group are
saddles, white bucks and many styles in
loafers.

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