100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1952

I I __________________________

U' Debaters
[o Discuss
~'
.andidates
"Eisenhower vs. Stevenson" is
e subject of the debate to be
ven at the first Speech Assembly
the year, at 4 p.m. today, in
ackham Lecture Hall.
On the platform with a team
presenting Iowa University, our
ebaters will again be competing
i the Big Ten Western Conference
ebate League's intercollegiate de-
ate program.
Each team is composed of one
emocratic and one Republican
peaker. Representing the Univer-
ty will be Dave Kornbluh, '54,
elected .by the University Young
emocrat club, and Jerry Fanger,
4L, selected by the Young Re-
ublicans.
The debate will include, instead
f the customary rebuttal speeches,
Michigan style cross examina-
ion, in which, following their first
>eeches, the speakers have an op-
ortunity to question their op-
onepts directly. This system orig-
iated at the University, and was
ecently adopted by the Big Ten
lebate League.
Elise Stevens
]o Be Heard
t HillFriday
Rise Stevens, mezzo-soprano
tar of the Metropolitan Opera,
ill appear at a concert at 8:30
.m. Friday in Hill Auditorium.
Born in New York City, Miss
tevens began singing when she
ras only 10 years old.
The first time she was offered
contract with the Metropolitan
Miss Stevens chose to continue
er studies in Salzburg, Vienna and
'aris. Her operatic debut occured
t the Prague Opera House. Later
he returned to sing at the Met.
Tickets for her Ann Arbor ap-
earance are on sale at the offices
f th% University Musical Society
a Burton Tower.,

Speech Ends Japanese
Chrysanthemum Exhibit

"Flower arranging to the Jap-
anese is erected on the same basis
of aesthetics as any of the more
conventional arts," Mrs. Frank N.
Wood of Ann Arbor professed yes-
terday in her talk on "The Tradi-
tions of Japanese Flower Arrange-
ments" at the Architecture Audi-
torium.
The talk closed the three-day
show of rare and unusual chrysan-
themums at Alumni Memorial
Hall which inaugurated the Jap-
anese Art Festival. Sunday, His
I. . I.. . . . . . . .
Briefs
MEETINGS.
The Modern Poetry Club will
hold its first meeting of the year
at 8 p.m. today in the League.
The informal organizational
meeting will preceed a poetry
reading by Prof. Austin Warren
of the English Dept.
The All-Asian Association elec-
tion meeting will be held 7:3P
p.m. today at the International
Center.
* * * *,
LECTURES...
The Student Bar Association of
the Law- School is sponsoring a
lecture at 4:20 p.m. today in Rm.
100 Hutchins Hall.
John P. Eddy, distinguished
English Barrister, will speak on
"The English Legal System."
* * *
Mrs. Albert Marckwardt, chair-
man of the city Democratic com-
mittee, will speak on "What the
Democrats Stand For" at 7:30
p.m. today at the Madelon Pound
House, 1024 Hill St.
* * *
ELECTIONS ...
The International Students As-
sociation has elected Suilin Ling,
Grad, president of the ICA to fill
the vacancy caused by the sudden
recall of former president, Taffara
De Guefe, '53L to a position in
.his native country, Ethiopia.

Excellency Eikichi Araki, Japanese
Ambassador to the United States,
will present a gift of Japanese
flowering cherry trees to the Uni-
versity. President Harlan H. Hat-
cher will accept the trees for the
University.
The art of flower arranging was
brought to Japan by Buddhist
priests five centuries before the
birth of Christ and has passed
through three phases since.
Originally, flower arrangements
were made as sacrifices to the
gods and were set in the innermost
shrines. Then the Japanese nobles
took over the custom, which by
this time had risen to an art, in
order to beautify their homes.
Today it is the style of the people.
Not merely serving as decora-
tion, Japanese flower arrange-
ments in the home must express
some part of life. "It's the inner
spirit of any plant that the flower
arranger wishes to show. Every ar-
rangement talks to you," Mrs.
Wood explained.
Hillel Offers
Home Cooking
"Here, have another piece of
my apple kugel."
This was the invitation extend-
ed by the cook at Hillel's newly
opened kosher kitchen yesterday.
However, she added that menus
preferred by the 18 studentsshe
serves feature substantial meat
dishes as a daily dinner "must."
So, at least for the present, such
European Jewish culinary special-;
ties as sweet and sour beets, mat-
zoh balls and gefilte fish will have
to take a back seat to lamb chops,
hamburgers and other more typi-
cally American fare.
The kitchen, inaugurated to
provide an eating place for Jewish
students who observe the dietary
laws, is currently serving lunch,
dinner and self-service breakfast.
Meat and dairy products are kept
in separate refrigerators and all
other requirements of the dietary
laws are. observed.

SL Agenda
The following items will be
on the agenda when the Stu-
dent Legislature meets at 7:34
p.m. today in the main dining
room of Stockwell Hall:
Report on the Lecture Com-
mittee motion adopted last
spring.
SAC report
SL campaign expenses
Homecoming report
Committee reports
All interested students and
faculty members are invited to
attend the meeting by SL.
Youth- To ear
Opera Music
na
Young people from Ann Arbor
and vicinity will have an oppor-
tunity to hear the University
Symphony Orchestra, conducted
by Wayne Dunlap, play a program
of opera music at 3 p.m. today in
Hill Auditorium.
Admission will be by tickets dis-
tributed through the p u b 1 i c
schools. Adults who attend are
asked to sit in the second balcony.
Included in the program will be
opera selections by Mozart, Hum-
perdinck, Smetana and Verdi. A
special feature of the concert will
be the complete performance of
"The Telephone" by Menotti. It
has been prepared under the di-
rection of Josef Blatt, director of
the opera department of the music
school.
Soloists on the program will be
Dolores Lowry, '538M, and Russell
Christopher, '52SM. Ann Arbor
High School soloists, trained by
John Merrill will be Joy Meyer, so-
prano; Vera French, soprano; and
Robert Smith, tenor.
Faculty To Study
Evaluation System
A committee composed of
faculty members of the Literary
College has been formed for the
purpose of studying the system of
faculty evaluations by students
now in use.
The committee, which is chaired
by Prof. Shorey Peterson of the
economics department, is expected
to hold its first meeting sometime
next week.

Do Sure You Del the DealI
You Deserve! See the finefeatures thatrdnerit
Figue th.sa ngsthat our prices provide
aNaturally, o

SEE WHAT YOU GAIN
WITH THESE EXCLUSIVE
CHEVROLET FEATURES

More Powerful Valve-in-Head Engine
with Powerglide Automatic Transmis-
sion (optional at extra cost) " Body by
Fisher 9 Centerpoise Power * Safety

Plate Glass all around, with E-Z-Eye
plate glass (optional at extra cost) *
Largest Brakes in its field " Unitized
Knee-Action Ride.

SEE WHAT
YOU SAVE
-ITHTH ow..stuPriced Line-in its Field!i
WITH T HE
SEE YOUR CHEVROLET DEALER FOR ALL YOUR AUTOMOTIVE NEEDS!
Conveniently listed under "Automobiles" in your local classified telephone directory

God's healing power
is available to you!
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST
announces

READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

0

1i

A FREE LECTURE

ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
SUBJECT-"Christian Science: The coincidence of Pure Science
and Pure Religion."
LECTURER-GEORGE NAY; Chicago, II1.
Member of the Board of Lectureship of the
Mother Church, the First Church of Christ Scientist,
in Boston, Massachusetts.
PLACE-MASON IC TEMPLE
South Fourth Avenue
TIME-Thursday, October 16 at 8:00 P.M.

What made Milwaukee
change' its mind'?
No doubt about it... modern times and modern taste
have changed Milwaukee's mind about beer.
Gone are the days when America's beer capital
could not agree on which beer was the finest. Now, year after year,
Blatz is the largest-selling beer in Milwaukee...
far and away the favorite in the city where nearly three-quarters
of the country's wonderful premiuln beers are brewed!
So wherever you are in this land of ours,
lift a glass of Blatz tonight. When you do, you'll join the growing
millions of Americans who sing:
I'm from Milwaukee
and I ought to know,

All are Cordially Invited

I

1

THE

I

ON SALE

Ml'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan