100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 17, 1952 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

W-WWW=wmowo

le

Student
* * *

Publica tions

Record

* * *

* * *

* * *

Daily Covers
news Events
)n Campus

Student Paper
In 63rd Year
The Michigan Daily, edited and
managed entirely by University
students is the most important
news agency for the campus and
has long been rated one of the out-
standing college dailies in the
country.
Now in its 63rd year of publi-
cation, The Daily boasts a com-
plete printing plant including an
electronic engraver and a rotary
press, financial independence and
a strong alumni group numbering
hundreds of men and women in
the publication field in this coun-
try and abroad.
* * *
STAFFED locally by more than
200 student editors, reporters and
business staffers, The Daily offers
complete campus and city cover-
age plus Associated Press cover-
age of national and world events.
Published six times weekly -
Tuesday through Sunday-dur-
ing the school year, The Daily
has the latest closing deadline of
any morning paper in the State.
The front page is put to bed at
2 a.m. and the circulation de-
partment makes good on a
promise of delivery before
r breakfast to subscribers.
On the editorial page The Daily
depends upon its staff members
for signed contributions which
represent their individual opinions.
The editorial page also fea-
tures syndicated columnist Drew
Pearson, the Alsop brothers and
Doris Fleeson. In addition to lo-
cal cartooning by Daily cartoon-
ists, Herb Block, the Pulitzer-
prizewinning cartoonist of the
Washington Post is carried by
The Daily.
The letters to the editor col-
umn is open to readers of The
Daily as a public forum. All letters
which are signed, 300 words or less
in length and in good taste are
published.
THE DAILY was first published
in the fall of 1890 by a group of
non-fraternity men.Later the staff
was opened to all interested stu-
dents.
It showed its stamina by sur-
viving its competitors in the
field and after the turn of the

Five Arts
Theme for
Generation
Generation, the newest literary
creation of publication-minded
University students, is a quarterly
magazine devoted to the five arts
and the campus' connection with
them.
Now rated as one of the best
student art magazines, Genera-
tion provides a showcase for stu-
dent creative work in literature,
music, visual art, architecture and
the dance.
ELEANOR SUSLOW Hope, '53,
will head this year's board of edi-
tors.
Generation offers immediate
opportunities for students in-
terested in contributing to or
editing the magazine.
Contributions to any of the five
departments are accepted from
all students in the first floor Gen-
eration office in the Student Pub-
lications Building.
* * *
PROSiECTIVE business and
edit staffers tryout in the first few
weeks of the fall session. After an
apprenticeship period, students
are eligible for promotion to edi-
torial positions through the Board
of Student Publications.
Business staff members manage
advertising, accounts and sales.
Originally an idea of the Inter
Arts Union, Generation features
96 pages of lithographed type and
graphic displays.
It sells regularly for 35 cents.

THE LARGE STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUILDING HOUSES FOUR CAMPUS PUBLICATIONS.
FACILITIES INCLUDE A $70,000 ROTARY PRESS INSTALLED IN 1950 AS WELL AS LINOTYPE
MACHINES, FULL DARK ROOM FACILITIES AND OTHER SPECIAL EQUIPMENT.
* * * * * * *

century, it was purchased by the
University.
Shortly afterwards, it was
moved from a small downtown
print shop to the Ann Arbor Press
building and the name was
changed to The Michigan Daily.
The present Student Publica-
tions Building, opened in 1932,
was financed largely by The
Daily's earnings. It contains to-
day one of the finest physical
plants, for a newspaper the size
of the Daily, in the country.
The most recent acquisition is a
new rotary press, installed in 1950.
* * *
THE DAILY is published by
students under the authority of
the Board in Control of Student
Publications, which is made up of
students elected by the campus
at large, and faculty and alumni
appointees.
The Board does not censor
editorials or news articles.
It has general responsibility for
the financial success of student
publications, but actual adminis-
tration is left to the students.
* . *
TRYOUTS on The Daily edi-
torial staff go through a semester
training program to learn the fun-
damentals of reporting, proofread-
ing, and headline writing. This is
followed by assignment to the re-

portorial staff, with responsibili-
ty for seeing that a particular beat
is covered.
From this staff, the night edi-
tors and their assistants-the
junior staff - are chosen. Each
night editor is in complete
charge of the actual publication
of the paper one night per week.
The senior editors are the man-
aging editor, who has general re-
sponsibility for everything that
appears in The Daily; the editor-
ial director, who is in charge of
the editorial page; the city editor,
who handles local news assign-
ments and directs the night edi-
tors; the feature editor, who takes
care of feature articles; the asso-
ciate city editor; and the associate
editors, who are responsible for
the training programs, and pho-
tography.
The junior and senior staffs
are selected by the Board in
Control of Student Publications
upon the recommendation of the
managing editor, and receive
salaries.
Parallel appointments as night
editors and senior editors are made
on the sports and women's staffs.
* * *
THE BUSINESS STAFF has
charge of The Daily's finances. It
handles advertising, accounts, and
circulation. r

Junior and senior jobs, as on
the editorial staff, are appoint-
ive, salaried positions.
The top business position is that
of business manager.
THE DAILY has won numerous
awards for excellence, including
those given by the Associated Col-
legiate Press, Sigma Delta Chi,
and the National Advertising
Service.

I

STUDENT SUPPLIES

TYPEWRITERS
ALL MAKES
FOUNTAIN PENS
STATIONERY
NOTEBOOKS

C.

I

I

|

Typewriter Repair Work a Specialty
Fountain Pens
Repaired by factory-trained men.
Since
1908 MORRILL'S
314 South State Street

G.I.
Requisitions
Accepted
Phone
7177

Campus Humorists Connive
Quarterly To Turn Out Garg

U

.1

r.remago

row

7Ae C/hem'a ┬žSLul

The impish little man with horns
who is the patron devil of the cam-
pus humor magazine, Gargoyle,
has been back in his Student Pub-
lications Building office for a year
and a half now.
And, from all reports, he ap-
pears to be thriving.
THE 42 - YEAR - OLD humor
magazine was thought to have
been silenced forever when finafi-
cial difficulties and lack of stu-
dent interest caused the Board in
Technic Put
Out Monthly
By Engineers
The University students' contri-
bution to the field of scientific
publications comes out monthly in
the form of the MichiganrTechnic.
Featuring scientific articles and
reports of engineering research;
the magazine is put out by engi-
* neering students in hopes of pro-
iding their classmates with the
"culture" they are accused of lack-
ing.
Faculty members and engineer-
ing college alumni as well as stu-
dents write for the Technic, but
editing, photography, leg work and
advertising sales are handled by
the student staff.
One of the country's few finan-
cially independent college engi-
neering magazines, the Technic
has received many top awards in
the annual Engineering College
Magazine Association competiti-
tion.
And on campus, it holds the;
brecord of being the oldest student1
publication.

Control of Student Publications to
muffle its voice two years ago last
spring.
But Gargoyle didn't like to
laugh alone. Following the
Board's ruling, he led a bandof
undaunted humorists to an off-
campus office and Gargoyle
published again.
Working under not-so-funny
conditions in a 2x4 section of a
cafeteria basement, Gargoyle edi-
tors managed to turn out two fi-
nancially and artistically success-
ful issues. The Board reinstated
the magazine a year ago last
spring.
SINCE THEN, Garg has re-
sumed its regular publication rate
of four issues a year and is in the
black again.
This fall, the campus will get
its first look at humor (Gargoyle
style) when hawkers of the
Wendy Owen Memorial Issue
take to the streets. The issue
will be a collection of the fun-
niestbstories and most lively art
Garg has turned out in its past
half-century of publication.
Occasionally advertised as the
outfit where "only lunatics need
apply," Garg staffers do their
share of business-like, hard work.
* * *
THE JOB of publication is di-
vided up among the following de-
partments: literary, circulation
and promotion, and advertising
and art.
Students may try out for any of
these departments early in the
fall. Promotions are made on the
basis of merit and efficiency.
Many Gargoyle staffers keep up
their funny work after they leave
Ann Arbor. Among famous Garg
alumni is cartoonist George Lich-
ty, creator of the syndicated com-
ic feature Grin and Bear It.

I

Welcomes You to Campus and
A FALL FESTIVAL of GREAT
American and European Films
THIS WEEK
SATURDAY ONLY
(September 20)
TWO OUTSTANDING FEATURES

T

I

r

I

HENRY FONDA CLAUDETTE COLBERT
in JOHN FORD'S PRODUCTION of Walter D. Edmonds'
DRUMS
ALONG THE MOHAWK

I

A 20TH CENTURY FOX PICTURE

in COLOR BY TECHNICOLOR

with EDNA MAY OLIVER and JOHN CARRADINE
"A FIRST RATE HISTORICAL FILM . . . as rich atmospherically as it is in action . . Mr.
Ford's technicolor caremas have brushed aside the years to present a fascinating picture.4
-N. Y. Times
ALSO

THE LAST OF THE TROUBADOURS
BING CROSBY

MADGE
EVANS

LOUIS
ARMSTRONG

EDITH
FELLOWS

"PENNIES FROM HEAVEN"
A COLUMBIA PICTURE
"GENIAL . . . INGRATIATING . . . MR. CROSBY'S BEST"-N. Y. TIMES

WANTED!

If

-.I-

a

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan