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October 04, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1952

a eoed Reds

MICHIGAN-STAN FORD BATTLE:

NBC To Televise Today's Game

* *

* *

e ,

By JERRY HELMAN
Today's clash between the Wol-
verines and Stanford's Indians has
been selected as the "game of the
week" and will be televised on a
nationwide hookup by NBC-TV.
S On campus, television sets in
fraternities, sororities and dormi-
tories along with those in the
League and Union will be turned in
at 4:45 p.m. on channel four to
the intersectional battle.
A 10 MEMBER committee chos-
en by the National Collegiate Ath-
letic Association included the con-
test in the list of 11 grid battles
which will be televised nationally
this year.
Teams are selected by the
committee with an eye toward
giving the TV audience a view
of sectional differences in foot-
ball style.
Actual history of the selection
system goes back two years when
three and sometimes four football
games were televised nationally
every Saturday.
As a result, attendance at small
college games dropped consider-
ably, causing the NCAA to step in
and limit national telecasts.
However, local airings of sec-
tional games will still be permitted,
and NCAA officials predict that
some 60 will televised.
TODAY'S game will have as
commentator former Michigan
All-American Tom Harmon.
The actual job of televising
the game began last Thursday
when one of NBC's mobile units,
replete with the very latest
equipment, rolled into Palo Alto,
Calif., and began setting up
shop.
Four TV cameras, including one
with a special closeup "zoomar"
lens, were set up in the stadium
and coaxial cables strung in ap-
propriate spots.
Two of the cameras were placed
on the 20-yard lines and one in-
stalled atop the press box on the
50. A fourth camera went in the
stadiunm office which is equipped
as a studio for between the halves
interviews.
BY FRIDAY afternpon the stage
was set and contact made by por-
table microwave relay to the near-
est TV station on the national co-
axial cable.
On Saturday morning, the en-
tire crew, including 10 engineers,
goes through a full-dress re-
hearsal.
And the end result of this prep-
aration is the picture students
scattered around the campus in
listening parties and football
fans throughout the nation will
see on their television sets this
afternoon.
Tickets for Gothic
Film on Sale Now
Membership tickets for the
Gothic Film Society's "outstand-
ing director" series can now be ob-
tained by sending a check or
money order for $4.00 to Treas-
urer, Gothic Film Society, 521 E.
Jefferson.
The 1952-53 series includes elev-
en silent and sound films: Wil-
liam Wellman's "Ox-Bow Inci-
dent"; D. W. Griffith's "Birth of
a Nation"; a French comedy "Le
Million"; "M" starring Peter Lor-
re; a German silent film, "Greed";
Greta Garbo in "The Joyless
Street;" "Battleship Potemkin"
and "The Battle of Russia," two
documentaries; a World War I
classic "All Quiet on the Western
Front"; "Morocco"; and King
Vidor's "Hallelujah."t
U1

Battle Creek
Extension
Set To Open
The establishment of a Univer-
sity Extension Service Office in
Battle Creek, announced yester-
day, will increase the number of
such extra-campus schooling cen-
ters to eight in the state.
The extension service along with
a new Center for Graduate Study
will be located in the Battle Creek
Vocational Bldg., and will permit
the University to expand its off-
campus instructional program in
Southwest Michigan, according to
President Harlan H. Hatcher.
This area had previously been
served mainly through the Grand!
Rapids office of the Extension
Service and the Center for Grad-
uate Study there.
DIRECTOR of the Extension
Service E. J. Soop said that an ex-
panded program of both credit and
non-credit courses had been of-
fered in Battle Creek this fall .in
anticipation of the new office.
The extension center had
been requested by the superin-
tendant of the Battle Creek
Public Schools in a statement in-
cluding an offer to provide nec-
essary space in the city's voca-
tional building.
The newly set up Center for
Graduate Study is the fifth of its
kind maintained by the Univer-
sity. Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
School of Graduate Studies said
the center will be helpful for
graduate students in Southwest-
ern Michigan seeking a master's
degree from the University.
He explained that all but 12
hours of the Master's degree re-
quirement can be earnedethrough
the Battle Creek center, providing
that the remaining hours fit into
the student's course.

(Continued from Page 1)

"But the Russians new propagan-
da line is that they see no reason
for a hate campaign since they
do not expect war."
"Therefore," Bretton contin-
ued," I see this new move not
as a change in USSR foreign
policy but in the substance of
Soviet propaganda."
Bretton added that Stalin's
stateme nt was "extraordinary"
since his previous "line" until now
was that the USSR must prepare
for war.
AGREEING with Prof. Bretton
that the action does not present
a serious crisis, Prof. Preston W.
Slosson of the history department
called the Soviet barring, "another
tension in the cold war."
Prof. Slosson pointed out that
Kennen has been especially hat-
ed by the Russians because he
is one of the chief authors of
the containment policy.
"The 'USSR must feel very
strongly to choose an election
year to take a direct slap at the
U.S. government," Slosson said.
Michigan Crib
Elects Officers
The Michigan Crib, campus pre-
law society, recently elected Larry
Price, '53, president of their group
for the year 1952-53.
Oirganized to familiarize under-
graduates interested in law with
requirements of law schools, the
Crib sponsors lectures and discus-
sions by prominent judges, lawyers
and professors.
Other officers elected are: Shir-
ley Cox, '54, vice-president; Ed
Planchon, '55, recording secretary,
Dean Jennings, '53, correspond-
ing secretary, and Dave Livingston
'55, treasurer.

Local Experts Comment
On Barring of Kennan

"Now both parties will have much
to say about how badly Russia is
behaving."
A member of the political
science department who declined
to be named, saw the move as "ob-
viously timed to have an effect on
the All Union Party Congress
which is now convening."
Labeling Kennen's dismissal as
"a propaganda move," the politi-
cal scientist predicted that "this
will be greeted with great cheers
from the Party Congress."

Alleged Reds
Get Bond Cut
DETROIT (-) - Federal Judge
Thomas P. Thornston yesterday
reduced the bond of three more al-
leged Communists accused of plot-
ting violent overthrow of the gov-
ernment.
Original bond of $12,00 Was cut
to $7,500 for Nathan Kaplan, bet-
ter know here as Nat Ganley, and
Philip Schatz. The $15,000 bond
of Thomas DeWitt Dennis, Jr. also
was reduced to $7,500.
* * *
THE THREE defendants are
among the six persons seized here
Sept. 17.

1

-,
needs your
CHANGE of ADDRESS
Report any change
NOW
THE ANN ARBOR BANK
State Street at Nickels Arcade 1108 South Unviersity
Main and Huron Sts.

t

TELEVISION'S GIANT EYE SCANS THE FOOTBALL FIELD, RELAYING THE PLAY TO AUDI-
ENCES ACROSS THE COUNTRY.j

A lger, Williams Trade
Charges in State Race

Ph. 5651 C
ENDS SUNDAY

mom"

I

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

.

By The Associated Press
Michigan's two gubernatorial
candidates took turns at taking
political pokes at each other's par-
ties yesterday as they continued
their campaigns.
Fred M. Alger, Jr., Republican
candidate for governor, was the
most vehement when he accused
the Democrats last night of try-
ing to "poison the minds" of pris-
on and public school employes
against the GOP.
* * s
THE LATEST move of "Wil-
liams and his political henchmen,"
Alger said, "is to try to give the
guards and other employes at
Jackson the impression that my
election would mean a cut in pay,
in personnel and a lowering of
working conditions because of my
program of thrift and economy in
state governmental expenditures.
"The attempt to poison the
minds of the prison employes is
only a part of the program of the
Williams-CIO combine to stay in
power in Michigan.
* * *

tory over short-sighted "economy"
ideas of the legislature.
"In embarking on this great ef-
fort," the governor said, "we are
moved not only by consideration
for humanity, but also by practical
concern for the taxpayers.
MEANWHILE, former prison
warden Julian N. Frisbie, con-
tradicting Democratic charges
that he is trying to get back on
the state payroll, took a job yes-
terday in private industry.
In Durand Thursday Governor
Williams said Frisbie, who has
been critical of the Democratic
administration handling of pris-
on affairs, "has obviously been
promised a return to the state pay-
roll" if Fred M. Alger is elected
governor.

I

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story of
our times.
Miniature
BUGS BUNNY
in
"HARE WE GO"

Starts Monday
"THE STRANGER
IN BETWEEN"

11

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.; Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.. Sunday Morning Services.
Oct. 5-Unreality.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian'Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Roam is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
9:45 A.M.: Bible Class "Genesis."
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship and Dedication Ser-
vice. Rev. James E. Fidler, of Philadelphia,
guest preacher.
12:30 Church Family Dinner and Communion
Service.
2:00-4:00 P.M.: Educational Plant Openhouse.
7:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild: Rev. James E.
Fidler "The Challenge of Christian Leadership."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30 A.M.: Service, with Holy Com-
munion. Sermon by pastor, "The Path of the
Just."
Sunday at 5:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program. Bible Study,
"Keeping Christ's Majesty Untarnished" (Col-
ossians); Candlelight Initiation of New Mem-
bers,.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Rev. Henry J. Kuizenga, Minister
Rev. Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Rev. Wm. S. Baker, Student Minister
Sunday Morning Service: 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
Communion Meditation by Rev. H. J. Kuizenga.
Sunday 10:00 A.M.: Student Bible Seminar.
6:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild. Panel on "What
Does Your Candidate Offer a Christian?" by
Dave Cargo and Blue Carstenson, presented by
the Outreach Commission.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mrs. W. S. Bicknell, Parish Assistant
Mr. E. J. Schuss, Student Advisor
Miss Jane Townsend, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group and Church
School.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship: Drama of Ancient
Israel, sermon by Rev. Edward H. Redman.
5:45 P.M.: Unitarian Junior High and Parents.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast in Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion. Sermon by the
Rev. W. R. Schutze.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
3:00 P.M.: High School Club Picnic.'
6:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club (University stu-
dents). The Rev. Henry Lewis, Mr. W. L. Ber-
ridge and Mr. William Sadler will report on
General Convention and Youth Convention.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer, St. Michael's Chapel.
Wednesday and Thursday, 7 A.M.: Holy Commun-
ion (followed b9' Student Breakfast).
Wednesday, 4:00-6:00: Student Tea, Canterbury
House.
Friday, 12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion; 6:00 P.M.:
Catch-All Club, Canterbury House.

A.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
Phone 7622

Sunday-9:20 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Trinity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
7:00 P.M.: LSA Meeting-Presentation of Luth-
eran World Federation held at Hanover, Ger-
many.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M.: "Teachings of the Various
Denominations."

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11

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street 4
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Warngdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers

FOR FUN AND
RELAXATION .. .

Golf Practice
Range

9:30 A.M.: Discussion Class, Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship: "If Anywhere, Then Every-
where." Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Dr. Large will
speak on "You, the Church and the World."

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAI CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Sts.
Rev. George W. Barger, Minister

WE FURNISH CLUBS.
OPEN 3:00-11:00 P.M.

31h miles east of Ann Arbor-
out Washtenaw and one mile
south on Milan Rd. (U.S.-23)
or out Packard Rd. to Milan Rd.
(U.S.-23).
NEW
SHIPMENT
OF

Sunday, October 5
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "What Means This Service.
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Streetf
Marilynn Williams, Associate Director
Wyn Price, Assistant
Tuesday Student Tea: 4:30 to 6:00, Guild House.
Sunday, Oct. 5, 7:00 P.M.
Discussion: Community tension spots by out-
standing community leaders.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Snnnsnr.d b th ChIristia~n Reformed4 Chu rches

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