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February 17, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,';

AGE SIX

THE MTCHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 17, 1953

NOW

AMPUTATION NO HANDICAP:
One Arm Plenty for Bricklayers

By MIKE WOLFF
Building a house with one arm
isn't as hard as it seems.
At least that's the opinion of
bricklayer Ira Rock who is now
erecting his eighth home since a
hunting accident claimed his leftv
arm 30 years ago.
* * *
ROCK WAS then 19 and had
been doing. masonry work for sev-
en years. "I wouldn't have known
how to do anything else so I
started looking for construction
work soon after being released
from the University Hospital," he
said.

* S

Before going out to work for
other people, however, he built
himself a home to convice scof-
fing friends he was capable.
"I'll never forget' the first time'
I tried to get a job. It was during
the depression when you. prac-
tically had to buy work. The fore-
man looked at me and laughed. He
asked why he should hire a one-
armedman when he could get all
the two-armed men he needed."
Rock, whose father was killed
on a building project, maintains
that one-armed bricklaying simply
involves reversing a few basic mo-
tions. "It ,was hard at first, but
I got used to using my knees and
shoulders as an extra arm," he
admitted.
His main problem is that in-
stead of holding the brick in one
hand and "mudding" it with the
other he has to put each brick in
place and then mud it.
Currently employed on a local
construction project, Rock is the
father of three girls and five boys.
His theory about working under a
handicap is that all one needs is,
"the will power and the mind to
go ahead,"
After watching Rock skillfully
hoist heavy cinder blocks into
place, one is aware he has follow-
ed his own advice.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
'NOT AS HARD AS IT LOOKS'

Publication
Policy Told
By Shapiro
"The editorial policy of our pub-
lication is essentially the same as
that of the Daily Worker and Prav-
da," Herb Shapiro, editor of New
Foundations magazine said Sun-
day, during a visit to the campus.
# Shapiro was in Ann Arbor to
interview student leaders on cur-
rent issues for a forthcoming ar-
ticle in the left-wing periodical.
* * *
THE EDITOR explained that
since NF agrees with the principles
of Marxism-Leninism, it would
take a similar approach to exist-
ing world problems as the other
publications.
In the afternoon Shapiro met
with Student Legislature Presi-
dent Howard Willens, '53; Jim
Labes, '54, of the Men's Judici-
ary Council; Rejeshwar Gupta,
Grad., SL member; Barnes Con-
nable, '53, Daily City Editor;
Zander Hollander, '53, Daily
Feature Editor, and Sid Klaus,
'53, Daily Associate City Editor.
The advisability of a meeting
between Stalin and Eisenhower,
suggestions for ending the Korean
War, student unity in this country,
discrimination on the Michigan
campus and reaction to the Re-
publican victory were among the
issues touched upon in the dis-
cussion. *
When Shapiro concluded the
questioning, the group began
quizzing the editor on many of
the same topic.
"The one general conclusion we
can draw from the discussion,"
Willens said as the meeting end-
ed, "was that the group and Sha-
piro agreed upon almost noth-
ing."
Siebert To Deliver
Journalism Talk
"What Are the Mass Media For?"
is the title of the fifth lecture in
journalism which will be given by
Fred S. Siebert, director of the
School of Journalism at the Uni-
versity of Illinois, at 3 p.m. to-
morrow in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.

Events of the Week

COUNSELOR:
Presbyterians Install
New Student Director

Student Players To Present
Barry's 'Philadelphia Story'

A score of prominent clergy -
men were in attendance Sunday at
the installation of Rev. William
S. Baker as Director of Student
Work for Presbyterian students at
the University.
The ceremony, which took place
at the Presbyterian church, was
witnessed by more than 400 per-
sons.
* * *
REV. WILLIAM H. Molbon, new-
ly-elected moderator of the De-
troit Presbytery, conducted the
formal service of installation. The
University had its representative
in Rev. DeWitt C. Baldwin, relig-
ious director of Lane Hall, who
gave the call to worship.
Rev. Robert Worth Frank,
president of McCormick Theo-
logical Seminary from which
Rev. Baker graduated iii 1945,
delivered the sermon "Why the
World Needs Christianity." Rev.
Baker's father came from North
Carolina to give the prayer at
his son's installation.
The position which Rev. Baker
now occupies is, historically speak-
ing, a part of a 66 year old in-
stitution. In 1887, the Tappan Hall
Association pioneered in the field
of student religious work in the
state universities. This work has
been carried on since 1922 by the
University of Michigan Presby-
terian Corporation in cooperation
with the local church.
Rev. Baker will serve as coun-
selor and minister to more than
1600 University Presbyterian stu-
dents.
Botanists Give
Science Talks
Prof. Pierre Dansereau of the
botany department and Prof. Fred
E. Dickinson, chairman of the
wood technology department were
the speakers at the Phi Sigma lec-
ture last evening in the Rackhiam
Bldg.
Prof. Dansereau spoke on "Tem-
porate Rain Forests of Brazil," il-
lustrating his talk with colored
slides of vegetation in New Zea-
land, Brazil and Costa Rica.
"Magic With Wood" was Prof.
Dickinson's topic. He reported on
recent developments in wood pro-
ducts, using diversified examples.

. *

The "bluebloods" of Philadel-
phia society will come to life on!
the stage of Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, at 8 p.m. tomorrow in
Philip Barry's fictional comedy,
"The Philadelphia Story."
Flashing diamonds will bedeck
the women and the '20's illegal
whiskey will be downed by mem-
bers of the cast in the latest Stu-
dent Players' production.
* * *
OF COURSE, neither the dia-
monds nor the whiskey will be
anything more than stage props.
The play centers about thex

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-Daily-Bety Smih
INSTALLATION - Rev. Baker
(left) is congratulated by Rev.
Molbon.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

STAR CLEANERS
1213 South University

character of Tracy Lord, played
by Harriet Bennett, Grad., who is
about to marry a wealthy coal
man, portrayed by Don Hawley,
'53.1
Reporters Mike Connor, played
by Bob Colton, '56 and Liz Embrie,
acted by Lucille Cowen, '56 are
sent to cover the gigantic wed-
ding. Tracy's former .husband,
Dexter Haven, played by Roy
Strozzi, Grad. also makes his ap-
pearance. From this point on the
play abounds in amusing compli-
cations.

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WEDNESDAY-
University Student Players will
present "The Philadelphia Story,"
by Philip Barry at 8 p.m. in Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre.
* * *
THURSDAY-
University Student Players will
present "The Philadelphia Story,"
by Phillip Barry at 8 p.m. in Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The University Symphony Band,
conducted by Prof. William D. Re-
velli, will perform at 8.:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium.
FRIDAY-
Philip Barry's play, "The Phila-
delphia Story," will be presented
by the University Student Players
at 8 p.m. in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Michigan vs.' North Dakota
hockey game at 8 p.m. in the
Coliseum.
The Thirteenth Annual Cham-
ber Music Festival will present
the Budapest String Quartet at

8:30 p.m. in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
SATURDAY-
Michigan vs. University of Min-
nesota swimming meet at 3:30
p.m. at the IM Bldg.
"The Philadelphia Story," a
play by Philip Barry, will be
given by the University Stu-
dent Players at 8 p.m. in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Michigan and North Dakota
hockey teams will meet at 8 p.m.
in the Coliseum.
Michigan will play the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin in a bas-
ketball match at 8 p.m. in Yost
Field IHouse.
The Budapest String Quartet'
will appear in the Chamber Mu-
sic Festival at 8:30 p.m. in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
SUNDAY-
The Chamber Music Festival
will feature the Budapest String
Quartet at 2:30 p.m. in Rackham
Lecture Hall.

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