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February 17, 1953 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1953-02-17

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.D

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 17, 1953

____________________________________________________________ I I I

DAILY

OFFICIAL
-BULLETIN

the Daily Official Bulletin is an
icial publication of the University
Michigan for which the Michigan
ily assumes no editorial responsl-
ity. Publication in it is construc-
e notice to all members of the
iversity. Notices should be sent in
PE WRITTEN form to Room 2552
ministration Building before 3 p.m.
e day preceding publication (before
a.m. on Saturday.)
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1953
Vol. LXiii, No. 89
Notices
etitions for manager of the sum-
and fall 1953 Student Directory
be accepted at the office of the
rd in Control of Student Publica-
i in the Student Publications Build-
prior to Feb. 21. Students petition-
should represent a campus organiza-
Ending Tonight
THEc iii

extra
I-G-M PRESENTS THE
SIDE STORY OF
IE WOR S
1EATEST FRAUD!

tion which will work with the manager
in the preparation, sale, and distribu-
tion of the Directory. Petitioners will
be interviewed by the Board on Feb.
27. Petitions should be in writing and
should contain a brief outline of the
petitioner's qualifications and plan of
operation.
Applications for Grants in Support of
Research Projects. Faculty members who
wish to apply for grants from the Re-
search Funds to support research proj-
ects during the next school year should
file their applications in the Office of
the Graduate School by Sat., Feb. 28,
1953. Application forms will be mailed
or can be obtained at 1006 Rackham
Building, Ext. 372.
General Undergraduate Scholarships.
General undergraduate scholarship ap-
plications may be obtained at 113 Ad-
ministration Building from Feb. 16
through 27. Completed applications
must -be returned by Mar. 1. All appli-
cations must be accompanied by Uni-
versity transcripts.
Detroit Armenian Women's Club
Scholarship. This scholarship of $250 is
available to undergraduate men and
women of Armenian parentage whose
residence is in the metropolitan dis-
trict of Detroit. Further information
and application forms may be obtained
at the Scholarship Office, 113 Admin-
istration Building. Applications must
be returned by May 15, 1953.
Personnel Interviews.
The Boy Scouts of America will have
an interviewer at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments on Wed., Feb. 18, in the
afternoon to see June graduates in-
terested in professional positions with
the Scouts.
There will be representative here
from General Elecric Company, Sche-
nectady, N.Y., on Feb. 19 to talk to
students for positions on their Sales
Promotion Program and also to those
interested in an Industrial Advertis-
ing position. There will be a group
meeting for June graduates in Business
Administration and LSA at 4 p.m.,
Wed., Feb. 18, in 4051 Administration
Building.
Personnel Requests.
Rem-Cru Titanium, Inc., of Midland,
Pa., is in need of Metallurgical, Me-
chanical, and Industrial Engineers, as
well as Physicists.
Automatic Electric Co., of Chicago,
Ill., has sent application blanks to the
Bureau of Appointments for interested
Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.
They have available positions for men
within their firm in the above-men-
tioned fields.
The City of Cincinnati has openings
for Civil Engineers who are interested
in important Public Works Projects.
General Motors Acceptance Corp., of
Detroit, is in need of several young
men for Credit, Collections, and Ad-
DEPT. OF SPEECH
PRESENTS
2 OPERAS
j Gounod's
"FAUST"
Feb. 27-28, Mar. 2-3-4
Pirandello's Comedy
"Right You Are
If You Think
You Are"
Mar. 25-28
Puccini's
"MADAME
BUTTERFLY"
April 16, 17, 20, 21
At Tappan H.S. Auditorium
d'Usseau & Gow's Drama
"DEEP ARE
THE ROOTS"
April 22-25

justment work. Recent or June gradu-
ates of Business Administration or re-
lated fields may apply.
The United States Safety Service Co.,
of Kansas City, Mo., is interested in a
young man to train for a sales posi-
tion in their Detroit branch office. Sales
work would be in parts of Detroit and
Toledo and would require one to be
on the road about half of the time.
Purdue University, of Lafayette, Ind.,
has openings in their'Internal Audit
Department for Accountants. Those
with or without experience may apply.
Radcliffe College, in Cambridge, Mass.,
announces a Special Fellowship for
their Management Training Program,
which is a one-year graduate program
for young women in the various fields
of administration.
Contact the Bureau 'of Appointments,
3528 Administration Building, Ext. 371,
for details concerning these and other
openings.
Lectures
Public Lecture, auspices of the Cen-
ter for Japanese Studies, "Changing Ja-
pan as Seen from Inside," Dr. Shiroshi
Nasu, famous agricultural economist,
professor of agriculture at Tokyo Uni-
versity, Wed., Feb. 18, 4:15 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
University Lecture. Schubert, Sonata
in B-Flat Major, analysis and perform-
ance by Helen Titus, 4:15 Tues., Feb. 17,
in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Haig Hagop
Najarian, Zoology; thesis, "Life History
Study on Echinoparyphium flexum
(Linton 1892) Dietz 1910 (Echinostomi-
dae: Trematoda)," Wed., Feb. 18, 2089
Natural Science Building, at 3 p.m.
Chairman, A. E. Woodhead.
Logical and Foundations Seminar.
The first meeting will be on Tues., Feb.
17, in 3001 Angell Hall from 3:10-4:00
p.m. to discuss the program for the
'second semester. Dr. Harary will talk
briefly on universal algebras.
Seminar in Hilbert Spaces, Tues., Feb.
17, 7:30 p.m., 247 West Engineering
Building.
The Actuarial Review Class, Part II,
will meet Tues., Feb. 17, at 2:10 p.m.
In 3201 Angell Hall. Discussion of trig-
onometry and analytic geometry prob-
lems, and algebra test.
Graduate Students now enrolled in
the University of Michigan who wish
to apply for admission to the Doc-
toral Program in Social Psychology
should submit applications to the office
of the Program, 5633 Haven.Hall, on or
before Mar. 2, 1953.
Room Changes for Sociology-Psychol-
ogy 62 are as follows: Section 1, 2435.
Mason Hall; Section 2, 1435 Mason Hall;
Section 3, 1437 Mason Hall; Section 4,
2448 Mason Hall; Section 5, 2419 Mason
Hall; Section 6, 2445 Mason Hall.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar. Prof.
P. M. Naghdi will speak on "A Review

of Basic Concepts in Plasticity" at 3:30
p.m. on Wed., Feb. 18, in West Engi-
neering Building.
The University Extension Service an-
nounces that enrollment is still open
in the following Tuesday and Wednes-
day evening classes offered in the Ann-
Arbor Extension program. Registration
may be made between 6:30 and 9:45
p.m., through Thursday of this week,
in 165 Business Administration Build-
ing.
Tuesday Classes
Europe Since 1919. The post World
War I settlement; its commendable as-
pects and its deficiencies; efforts of the
powers to ensure lasting peace; the
great depression of 1929 and its effects
on European politics; the weakening of
liberalism and the rise of authoritarian
andand totalitarian states; causes and
course of World War II; developments
since 1945. The objective will be the
understanding of the present general
situation and the position of the United
States and the American citizen in the
face of Russia and Communism. (His-
tory 92, two hours undergraduate
credit). Instructor: Prof. Karl H. Reich.
enbach. Sixteen weeks. $18. 7:30 p.m
177 Business Administration Building.
Measuring and Gaging. Inspection
principles, measuring and gaging equip-
ment, and the nature of variables of
machining processes requiring control.
Class period is devoted to lectures and
discussions, with laboratory demonstra-
tions. Instructor: Robert M. Caddell.
Sixteen weeks, $18. 7:00-9:00 p.m., 2310
and 2300 East Engineering Building.
Practical Public Speaking. For the
student who desires a course devoted
exclusively to training in public
speaking rather than a basic course in
the whole field of speech. Study analy-
sis, practice, and criticism designed to
promote the acquisition of proficiency
in extemporaneous speaking. May be
taken for credit or without credit. Lim-
it to thirty persons. (Speech 31, two
hours undergraduate credit). Instruc-
tor: Paul E. Cairns. Sixteen weeks, $18.
7:30 p.m.,,1429 Mason Hall.
Scientific Living. The fundamentals
of semantics, with special reference to
the meaning of words in their bearing
on daily life; the linguistic bases of
sane thinking and sane conduct; the
physiological and psychological foun-
dations of meaning - the mind-body
prbblem. Instructor: Prof. Clarence L.
Meader. Eight weeks, $6. 7 p.m., 171
Business Administration Building.
Social Forces in our Changing World.
A group of lectures from the depart-
ments of Economics, Political Science,
Psychology, and Sociology will present
an analysis of various problems facing
man in contemporary society.
The influence of major social forces
and processes upon human relations
will be examined with reference to four
levels: (a) problems affecting individual
behavior, (b) community problems, (c)
national affairs, and (d) international
programs.
Deals with such specific problems as
individual maladjustment, family dis-
organization, national unity and dis-
ADVENTURE z2th year=
EUROPE-60 Days $475
-. (all-expene ind. aeamer).
Bicycle, Faltboot, Ski, Mo-
tor, Rail. Other tours to
Latin America, West, Orient
and Around the World.
France, Germany, Spain, Scandi.
navia-ART, DANCE, MUSIC. Study
cTours? Yes! College credit avail.
able on most, but still a won.
derful experience in an
atmosphere of camarad-
erie. Mexico-45 Days
$350.
TRAVEL____
Informally, off the beaten track, with
SITA.. Congenial groups with'
similar interests. 150 col-
?Spend Leasi leges repesented on 1952
tours.
Your Travel Agent o I
Studens nterntionl
Travel Asscation
545 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 17.'MU 2-4544

unity, and international conflict and
cooperation. Demonstrates how these
and other related problems can be
more adequately understood and dealt
with in the light of recent develop-
ments in the social sciences. Instructor:
Prof. Robert C. Angell, Prof. Samuel J.
Eldersveld, Prof. Morris J'anowitz,
Prof. Harold M. Levinson, Milton J.
Rosenberg, Prof. Guy E. Swanson. Fif-
teen weeks, $18. 7:30 p.m., 176 Business
Administration Building.
Wednesday Classes
Elementary General Psychology. In-
troduction to the principles of psychol-
ogy with a survey of motivation, emo-
tion, perception ability, and personali-
ty. (Psychology 31E, two hours under-
graduate credit). Instructor, Dr. Eliz-
abeth M. Douvan. Sixteen weeks, $18.
7:30 p.m., 31 Business Administration
Building.
Great Books I. This University of
Michigan Great Books course is an in-
troduction to and an analysis of books
that have affected Western civilization.
Selections are made from many periods
of history and types of writing, their
literary merits as well as their signifi
cance for Western thought and action
being discussed. Section I, open to be-
ginners, opened February 11 and will
meet on alternate Wednesdays; Section
II, open to those who have had Sec-
tion I, will begin on Wed., Feb. 18, and
meet on alternate weeks. Instructor,
John E. Bingley. Eight sessions, $8, 7:30
p.m., 69 Business Administration Build-
ing.
Introduction to Literature of Music.
Brings to the layman a practical meth-
od of listening to instrumental music
and familiarizes him with the sig-
nificant forms and styles of music com-
position heard currently in the concert
hall and over the radio. Its aim is
practical and its approach non-techni-
cal; no previous knowledge of music
is necessary. A series of six lectures on
the 1953 May Festival programs is in-
cluded in this course, but may be elect-
ed separately if desired. Instructor:
Prof. Glenn D. McGeoch. Sixteen weeks,
$18. 7 p.m., 206 Burton lPmorial Tow-
er.
Parliamentary Procedure. The princi-
ples of parliamentary procedure and
the rules for conducting bsinuess meet-
ings of clubs, associations, and con-
ventions. Practice in presiding and rul-
ing on points of order. Trains men and
women in various organizations how
to get democratic group action through
the use of parliamentary procedure.
Instructor: Dr. Fred G. Stevenson. Eight

weeks, $6. 7:30 p.m., 177 Business Ad-
ministration Building.
Spring Gardening. Reviews techniques
and theories covered in the recently
completed fall class, centering upon
the following seasonal topics: annual
flowers and vegetables, wood and her-
baceous perennials, lawn care, spring
pruning, weed control, summer mulch-
ing, moisture supply, conservation, and
soil conditioning. Instructor: Ruth
Mosher Place. Eight weeks, $6. 7:30
p.m., 176 Business Administration
Building.
Writers Workshop. Designed for stu-
dents who wish to write fiction, poetry,
essays, or drama, and who wish to
discuss the problems associated with
writing in any of these forms. Personal
conferences for special problems of in-
dividual students may be arranged.
Instructor: Prof. Donald R. Pearce. Six-
teen weeks, $18. 7:30 p.m., 171 Business
Administration Building.
Concerts
Jascha Heifetz will be heard in the
Extra Concert Series Tues., Feb. 17, at
8:30 o'clock, in Hill Auditorium, with
Emanuel Bay at the piano. He will play
the following program: Sonata by
Strauss; Bruch's Fantasy, Op. 46;
Schubert Sonatina No. 3; Nocturne, by
Sibelius; Valses Nos. 6 and 7 by Ravel;
Notturno by Szymanowski; and the
Wieniowski Polonaise brillante in A
major.
Tickets, at $2.50, $2.00, and $1.50 each
will continue on sale daily at the offices
of the University Musical Society in
Burton Tower; and after 7 o'clock on
the night of the concert in the Hill
Auditorium box office.
Student Recital. David Murray, bari-
tone, will present a program in partial
fulfillment of the requirements for the
Bachelor of Music degree at 8:30 Wed.,
Feb. 18, in Auditorium A in Angell Hall.
He will be accompanied at the piano
by Helen Karg in compositions by Han-
del, Beethoven, Gretry, Mozart, and
Vaughan-Williams. The recital will be
open to the general public.
Events Today
Political Science Round Table will
meet at 7:45 in the Rackham Amphi-
theater. The staff of Phoenix Projeot
Number 48 will conduct a "Round Ta-
ble" on the subject of "Atomic Energy
(Continued on Page 4)

FOR SALE

1949 FORD TUDOR EIGHT, new tires.
Low mileage and exceptionally clean.
Radio, heater, undercoating, turning
indicators, back-up lights, side mirror,
etc. )?hone 3-2512.
PARAKEETS, babies and breeders, ca-
naries, singers, cages and supplies. 305
W. Hoover. Phone 2-2403. )1F
GENUINE silver fox coat. Original cost
$1,000. Will sell for $100. Size 12-14.
Length 37". Ph. 2-7981. )10F
USED HEARSE, 1938 Olds, new tires, re-
built engine, 36,000 miles. $550. Call
2-8168 after 5 p.m. )16F
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER-Smith-Cor-
ona. 1950 "Sterling" model. Excellent
condition. Call 2-7159 evenings from
6:00 to 10:30. )15F
MOVIE CAMERA-New Revere 8 mm.
F:2. $65. Phone 2-8508 evenings. )14F
FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOM for men. Linen fur-
nished. Community living room with
fireplace. 1412 Cambridge or 7683. )2C
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR OVERNIGHT GUESTS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State.) Phone 3-8454. )3D
SUITE to share with board. 520 Thomp-
son.. )8D
MALE STUDENTS-Large double rooms,
one with kitchen. Also suites. %
block from campus. Convenient and
comfortable. 417 E. Liberty. )4D
PERSONAL
COOPERATIVE living for men on cam-
pus. Room and board, $12 per week.
Board only $8 per week. Call Luther,
7211. )3P

HELP WANTED
CAMP COUNSELORS-Men who are in-
terested in working with boys in a
small, 10 week summer camp located
in Northern Michigan. Waterfront
director, rifelry instructor, 2 general
camp counselors and a purchasing
agent wanted. If interested call 2-9454
evenings. )10H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S. State St., Phone 7177. )2B
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Past & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & TV.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Uni., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )1B
TYPING, reasonable rates, accurate and
efficient. Phone 7590. 830 So. Main.
)4B
WASHING - Finished work and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-6.88. Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )7B
APPLICATION PIOTOGRAPHS
While-U-wait at Snider studios, 213
S. Main, opposite Woolworths. )6B
GOOD RENTAL typewriters available at
reasonable2rates Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone 2-1213.
)4B
MISCELLANEOUS
MOTHER of 6 month old will exchange
baby sitting servicesr with other Uni-
versity wives. Call 3-5472. )4M
TIME-1 semester, 4 months, $1.
LIFE-1 semester, 21 weeks, $1.75.
Phone 6007 to order. Student Periodi-
cal Agency. )2M

CLASSIFIEDSI

k

f

4

f'

LI

OPENING TOMORROW

LRILYN ERSKINE"* HOWARD KEEP:
ORGE MURPHY!WALTER PIDGEON
RE SCHARY * BARRY SULLIVAN
BERT TAYLOR * JAMES WHITMORE
Wednesday
"KANSAS CITY
CONFIDENTIAL"

the student plaers"t

Phi ladelphia
story"

A- 0O./1 r
6 (
I,, Q_ ~

FRIDAY

Cinema SL qud/d

SATURDAY,

.4

I

C41 1";,*

ndo Tuesday
7 took you
out of the
gutte.../ can
M.17g you
buck!"

~pP~manyhior uwy
a new
EUROPEAN

GAY... EST!"
i rr N.Y. IMES
DON'T MISS THIS PLAY
of which the Philadelphia Inquirer wrote:
"Sustained, sparkling, sophisticated,
completely captivating comedy."
Wed., Feb. 18 through Sat., Feb. 21
Tickets: 1 st ]6 rows orchestra & 1 st 4 rows balcony, $1.00
All Other Seats, 75c
Curtain Time 8 P.M., Box Office Open from 2 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER

t

SUNDAY

THE GRAPES
OF WRATH"

I

39 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.
STUDENTS! EARN EXTRA MONEY!
Students who want to earn a commission selling the
PAMOSA SYSTEM on the campus, contact us.

t4rctitectupe 6uditiou

Lana TURNER
-.. - . 1
walter PIDGEUN I
Dick POWELL
p
'p
BARRY.
SULLIVAN
GLORIA
GRAHAME
ROLAND -
Also
Bully Dog - Catoon

Closing This Sunday
"Much Ado About Nothing"
THE ARTS THEATER

-°-

11

MAIL ORDERS TO:
Box Office,
Mendelssohn Theater
PRICES:
Operas 1.50, 1.20, 90c
Student Rate:
Thurs. & Mon. 75c
Plays 1.20, 90c, 60c
Student Rate:
Wed. & Thurs. 50c
All Performances at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
(Except Madame Butterfly)

TO ALL MEMBERS -
Because of the large numbers of people who want
to see. the Shakespeare play, members should make
reservations immediately in order to insure seats on
th6 evening that they desire.
$5 Membership now at the Theater
or Bob' Marshall's, Wahr's, Music Center

I .

11

0

F

~irrm

I

I

11

4

~1
LS

Tuesday, Feb. 17

8:30

III HILL AUDITORIUM

I I - ,, 1 i * ,COLOR 8 U'.

HEY, BABE ... How about me and youse going to

III

If

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