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May 28, 1953 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-28

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PAGE T!T

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

..'.... j:

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATIONESCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 29 - June 9
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and recitations, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week:
for courses having recitations only, the time of the class is the
time of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be ex-
amined at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
12 o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes and other
"irregular" classes may use any examination period provided
there is no conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are ar-
ranged for by the "irregular" classes).
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination may
be changed without the consent of the Committee on Examina-
tion Schedules.

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TO HANG IN A 30TH CENTURY ART MUSEUM?
POpular Arts Slated
For Summer Exhibit

THURSDAY, MAY 28, 1951

Time of Class

Time of Examination

MONDAY

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8
9
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11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Friday, May 29
Saturday, May 30
Tuesday, June 2
Thursday. June 4
Monday, June 1
Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Thursday, June 4
Monday, June 1
Wednesday, June 3
Friday, May 29
Saturday, May 30
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, June 5

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
over

TUEWtAY

These regular examination periods have precedence

any special period scheduled concurrently. Conflicts must be
arranged by the instructor of the "special" class.
SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS

Sociology 51, 54, 60. 90
English 1, 2
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 6, 12
Psychology 31
Botany 1, 2, 122
Zoology 1
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Political Science 2

Saturday, May 30
Saturday, May 30
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, June 5
Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 6
Monday, June 8
Monday, June 8
Tuesday, June 9
Tuesday, June 9

2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

By BECKY CONRAD
Chances for Maggie and Jiggs
to be exhibited in 30th century
art museums are slim, but other
phases of popular visual arts in
commercial fields may hang side
by side with the Mona Lisa in the
Louvres of the future.
Prof. Donald Gooch and Prof.
David Reider of the architecture
.college have assembled an exhibit
presenting popular visual art
forms "as a social phenomenon of
contemporary American culture
and aimed at appraising its sig-
nificance as an art form," accord-
ing to Prof. Gooch.
THE EXHIBIT, scheduled from
June 30 to Aug. 7 in the Museum,
of Art, will be held in conjunction
with a summer area program onj
"Popular Arts in America."
Lectures by well-known figures
in commercial art fields will be
a featured part of the program,
with related courses on modern
music, literature, fine arts, phil-
osophy and sociology.
"Much of the fine arts of the
past very often represented to peo-I
ple then what our popular arts
represent today," Prof. Gooch ex-
plained.
"Gothic windows in Medieval
cathedrals presented to an illiter-
ate public their Biblical educa-
tion," he noted, "but were not in-,
tended to be museum pieces."
"Egyptian inscriptions vividly
portray in pictures the history
and laws of Cleopatra's stamp-
ing ground," he added.
"Since these arts were created
in stone and other durable mater-
ials, their lasting quality has given
them an aura of 'fine art,'" Prof.
Gooth explained.
"TODAY MOST popular art for
the masses is printed on perish-
able materials," he noted, "bring-
ing to mind the question of what
type of art archeologists of the
future will be able to pick and
choose from."
Commercial posters of Tou-
louse-Lautrec of Moulin Rouge
fame are exhibited in museums
ROTC Critics
Given Answer
(Continued from page 2)

today alongside paintings of
"fine artists."
"In present day America. there
are probably more fine artists con-
tributing work to commercial fields
than ever before," Prof. Gooch
said.
* * *
ESQUIRE Magazine illustrator
David Stone Martin is recognized
both as a fine artist and a com-
mercial painter.
Poster artist Ben Shawn and
advertising designer and paint-
er Gladys Brockmore Davis are
successful artists who have bro-
ken into the field of fine art.
"There is a great deal of ex-
tremely good art given to the
masses through the media of pub-
lication that should be recognized,"
Prof. Gooch explained. "There-
fore we have arranged an exhibi-
tion broad enough in scope to in-
clude commercial arts represent-
ing cartooning, magazine and book
illustration, photography andbad-
vertising design."
* * *

Dead.Week
Senior activities for the "dead
week" period beginning Mon-
day, June 8 are scheduled as
follows:
Monday-Picnic at 3 p.m. at
Island Park.
Tuesday-Dinner at 5 p.m.
at a Liberty St. tavern
Wednesday-Movies at Palm-
er Field
Thursday - Co-recreation
night at the Union
Friday-Dance at 9 p.m. on
the Diagonal
Price Concert
Set forToday
Although the familiar bells of
Burton Tower haven't sounded the
hour for the past two weeks, Prof.
Percival Price of the music school
will play another carillon concert
at 7:15 p.m. today.
His program will feature a group
of American popular songs of the
19th century. They include Phile's
"Hail Columbia," Emmet's "Dixie,"
Foster's "Old Folks at Home" and
Bishop's "When Johnny Comes
Marching Home."
One of Prof. Price's composi-
tions, "Children's Suite," and a
group of seven short movements
for a three octave carillon will be
played.
Prof. Price will also perform
three Debussy numbers, "Les Dan-
seuses de Delphes," "Bruyeres" and
"Claire de Lune."
Delta Zeta House
To Become Co-op
The house of the local Delta
Zeta chapter at 1824 Geddes Ave,
has* been purchased by the Uni-
versity for use as a women's co-
operative beginning next fall, ac-
cording to University Vice-Presi-
dent Wilbur K. Pierpont.
It will be the first student co-
operative purchased by the Uni-
versity. Two others, Adelia Cheever
and Henderson House, were gifts
from private benefactors. Other
campus cooperatives are owned by
the National Student Cooperative
League.
Hillel r Present
Festival Display
The Jewish Community Center
will hold an open house at 8 p.m.
tomorrow at the Hillel Founda-
tion 1429 Hill St.
Featured will be a display of
ceremonial tables of the various
Jewish holidays.

BARBED:
Wire Stops
~U' Tarzans'
"He floats through the air with
the greatest of ease, the wire with
the barbs tearing holes in his
knees."
Such might be the lament of
any student who dares to swing
from the bar running across the
canopy over the side entrance of
the Union. For,; laid neatly across
the five-foot long bar is a single
strand of barbed wire.
USUALLY reserved for keeping
cows in pasture, the barbed wire
has been in its present location
since shortly after the war, ac-
cording to Union officials. At that
time, many high school students
used the bar as part of regular
follow-the-leader games.
It became routine nocturnal
adventure forthese students to
walk to the top step under the
canopy, take a running jump
and try to spear the bar in their
hands.
After several attempts at this,
usually missing the bar, they
would finally manage to grab it
and swing back and forth,
Union Pins Ready
All men students eligible for Un-
ion life memberships may pick up
their membership pins at the busi-
ness office of the Union.

REMEMBER!
to give us your change of address
for the summer.
THlE ANN ARBOR BANK
Corner Main-Huron Streets
U. of M. Branch, 330 South State
1108 S. University

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Special examination periods will be arranged by instructors
for degree candidates in the group finals that occur June 6,*
June 8, or June 9: separate lists of degree candidates will be
furnished only for these special exam periods.
* Degree candidates may take exams on June 6, instead of
having special exam periods, however, only 24 hours are avail-
able until the final due date for grades to be filed with the
Registrar's Office for degree candidates which is Sunday, June
7, at 4 p.m.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the University. For time and place of examina-
tions, see bulletin board in the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES.
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
S- -*
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
College of Engineering
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
May 29 - June 9
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week:
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of
the first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3044 East Engineering Build-
ing between May 12 and May 19 for instruction. To avoid mis-
understandings and errors each student should receive notifi-
cation from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period May 29 to June 9.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

INCLUDED in the exhibit are
works of cartoonists Al Capp, Walt
Kelly, Rube Goldberg and Milton
Caniff who will deliver the first
popula rarts lecture on "Art and
the Comic Strip" June 25.
Magazine illustrators Jon Whit-
comb, Al Parker, Ben Stahl; pho-
tographers Dan Weiner, Richard
Avedon, John Rawlings; and ad-
vertising designers Robert Gage,
Lester Beall and Paul Rand will
be represented in the exhibit.
University graduates C. F. KoV-
ten, Stephen Michael and Richard
Hirn will show works in the sum-
mer exhibit.

k maon \ now

YOU CAN RENTI
16 mm. Projectors - 16 mm. Cameras
Polaroid and Stereo Cameras
at
Purchase Camera Shop
1 116 So. University Phone 6972
Take a tip..
from me!
and DRIVE IN
and SHOP at

I

I

Time of Class

Time of Examination

and other University depart-
ments.
Although he acknowledged
marks might be somewhat higher
than in other courses, the colonel
pointed out that NROTC students
are selected for academic fitness
and do superior work.
Financing of programs and uni-
fication were seen by him as tech-
nical problems which could only
be solved through higher echelons
than the individual campus unit.
On the whole, he concluded,
ROTC programs have worked
out quite well and are fulfilling
their important role in the de-
fense system.
"There can always be improve-
ment," he said, "but investigation
of curricula, instruction and stu-
dent opinion would show there is
far less wrong than critics imag-
ine."
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
timonial meeting at 7:30, Fireside Room,
Lane Hall.
International Center Weekly Tea for
foreign studentis and American friends
from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Congregational Disciples Guild. Mid-

114 E. Williams

MONDAY

Phone 7191
Open Doily 10 A.M. - 10 P.M.
Sunday, Noon - 7 P.M.

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Friday, May 29
Saturday, May 30
Tuesday, June 2
Thursday, June 4
Monday, June 1
Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Thursday, June 4
Monday, June 1
Wednesday, June 3
Friday, May 29
Saturday, May 30
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, June 5

TUESDAY

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SPECIAL
COLLEGE OF]

9-12
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9-12
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9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
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2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5

Uv
SAVE AT SAM'S STORE___
ARMY TYPE
A HANDY ITEM FOR TRAVEL,
CAMP OR STORAGE
Plus Excise and Sales Tax

PERIODS
ENGINEERING
* Saturday, May 30

EE 5

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