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May 27, 1953 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1953-05-27

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PAGE SIX

TiM MICHIGAN DXILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 1953

____________________________________________________________________________ .1 _______________________________________

University-Owned House
To BeIgnited by Firemen

LEAGUE FIRST LADY RETIRES:
PhylKaufman Gives Up 'U' Politics

Naval ROTC HOPWOOD LECTURE:
D AI. -ri 1

'a

Educated firemen will set fire to
a $300 "research" house and then
put out the blaze in order to dem-
onstrate a new principle in fire
fighting at the twenty-fifth annual
SL Agenda
Student Legislature will dis-
cuss the following items of
business at an open meeting at
7:30 p.m. today in Strauss Din-
ing Rm., East Quad.
Motion on Academic Freedom
Cinema Guild Report
Report of Reorganization
Committee
Better Business Board Report
Summer Planning and Prog-
ress Report

Michigan Fire College at the Uni-
versity June 23 to 26.
Firemen, civil defense workers
and municipal officials from all
over the state will be shown the
efficiency of low pressure fog, a
fine water spray which turns to
steam and pushes smoke and heat
out of a burning building.
The eight-room wooden house
to be used in the test is on Uni-
versity property located at Hill
and Fifth and was to be torn
down.
Wallace Gannon of the Univer-
sity Extension Service which spon-
sors the Fire College, said heat
testing devices will be placed in-
side the building so interior tem-
peratures can be recorded. The
amount of water used will also be
measured, he added.
Gannon said the fire will be
carefully controlled so there will
be no danger to near-by property.

Well-disciplined energy has been
the key for the first lady of the
League, Phyllis Kaufman, in her
tortuous climb up the campus po-
litical ladder.
From inconspicuous beginnings
in newly opened Alice Lloyd Hall
four years ago, Miss Kaufman rose
through a maze of positions and
activities to hernewly-shed posi-
tion as president of the League.
* * *
DISTRACTIONS and frustra-
tions of extra-curricular life have
left the perpetual Kaufman smile
intact, and a friendly disposition
unruffled through incessant aggra-
vations.
Deans on down have learned
that Miss Kaufman's innate sense
of tact frequently sugar-coats a
forthright and determined nature.
"My chief accomplishment at
the League," she reminisces with
the embryonic nostalgia of be-
ing four weeks removed from her
office, "was to overhaul and
modernize a patchwork constitu-
tion."
Friends can attest to the months
of nerve-wracking effort embodied
in that statement. In organizations
where tradition has worn deep
paths, change is naturally suspect-
ed, and wins acceptance only after
rigorous evaluation. And this
process, to those involved in it,
is a most time-consuming and
trying one.
However, the new constitution
is in the process of clearing its fi-
nal channels this week, and will
shortly become a reality.
AN ATTRACTIVE shapely bru-
nette Miss Kaufman, in her alter
ego as a student, has majored in
speech correction and education.
"My grades are nothing to brag
about," she claims when pressed
for her point average. But in-
formed sources maintain that she
isn't too far from the 3.0 mark.
The retired chief female ex-
ecutive is just completing a

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
FINIS--Campus career completed, Phyllis Kaufman, '53Ed, pre-
pares for departure, triumphant after clearing her last gradua-
tion hurdle, a freshman physical education test.

Honors Eight"
Midshipmen
Eight midshipmen were honored
recently at the Annual Awards Re-
view held by the Naval ROTC.
Awards were presented recogniz-
ing achievement, scholastic at-
tainment and character.t
MIDSHIPMEN Bruce J. Ma-;
guire, '53BAd, and William C. Fil-7
kins, '53, were awarded the Unit-
ed States Naval Institute Associ-
ate Award and the United States
Naval Institute Regular Award for
interest in the advancement of
professional, literary and scientific
knowledge in the Navy by Cdr. G.
W. Smith, U.S.N.-
Midshipman James Kneussl,1
'53, was presented the Marine
Corps Association Award by<
Maj. G. C. Williams, Jr., U.S.N.,
as the outstanding Marine cadet.
Scabbard and Blade Award for
the outstanding sophomore mid-
shipman was presented to William
C. Weber.
For outstanding attainment in
the field of military science Mid-
shipman George R. Curry, '54E,
received the Armed Forces Chem-
ical Association Medal from Lt. R.
M. Davis, U.S.N.
Col. W. B. McKean, chairman of
the department of naval science
presented Midshipmen Robert 0.
Harger, '54E, and John Venner-
holm, The Chicago Tribune Silver
and Gold Medals respectively for
scholastic attainment, military
achievement and character.
Midshipman William B. Stason,
'53, was presented the National So-
ciety of the Sons of the American
Revolution Medal for leadership.
Fries To Speak
On Linguistics
Prof. Charles C. Fries of the
English department will speak at
8 p.m. today on "Meaning and Lin-
guistic Analysis" at a meeting of
the Linguistics Club in the East
Conference Rm., Rackham Bldg.
The meeting will be open to the
public.

Stephen Spender, poet, literary
c'ritic and one of the founders of
the literary review "Horizon" will
deliver the Hopwood lecture at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow, in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
At present a visiting lecturer at
the University of Cincinnati,
Spender will speak on, "Being a
YoungWriter, Past, Present and
Future."
Pogue Receives
IBurkan Law Prize
Richard W. Pogue, '53L, has re-
ceived the $150 Nathan Burkan
Memorial Award for , his essay,
"Borderland - Where Copyright
and Design Patent Meet."

Known foremost as a poet his
works include, "Poems," "Poems
for Spain" and "Vienna." How-
ever Spender has also done much
work as a critic and has authored
books on politics and morals.
Some of these works include,
"European Witness" in which he
shows the effect Nazism has had
on German intellectuals: "For-
ward from Liberalism" and an au-
tobiography titled "World Within
World."
After Spender's address Prof.
Arno L. Bader of the English de-
partment will present checks to
the winners of the annual Jules
and Avery Hopwood contest in cre-
ative writing.

A '

4

4'

roes npender to ueiiver
Talk on YoungWriters

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Here is the Bes
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Write us for details, a

EXT FALL?
RADUATES
IN MILL
rp.
ER HOUR
OVERTIME
NDITIONS

Elementary School. "I love
teaching," she declares, pri-
vately expressing a partiality
for the chubbier members of her
spitball-tossing battalions.
Teaching has at this point large-I
ly supplanted her earlier vocation-
al objectives of speech correction.
Principle need at this juncture is
a job for next year, she intimates.

* * #

t-

A NATIVE of South Haven,
Michigan, she found high school a
happy hunting ground activity-
wise as well, worked on a bevy of
organizations, including the stu-
dent council, dramatics group,
yearbook, and school band.
In college, she picked up where
she left off in South Haven. Her
first break came when, much to
her amazement, she was named
..i....«. . . 1,..27 ... - - - F

tively quiet-Miss Kaufman con-
tented herself with chairing an
Assembly Committee, plus some
miscellaneous work with the
League, dormitory government and
Soph Cab.
In that spring, she sprang back
into the campus political scene,
won a Student Legislature seat
handily. In the fall, she was run-
ning the election -- and shortly
thereafter, had risen to the cabi-
net as corresponding secretary.
LAST SPRING, two alternatives
faced the energetic coed-retire-
ment to a cloistered academic life,
or running for the League presi-
dency. And this is where we came
in.
Most recent triumph for the
bustling ex-president is comple-
tion of a requirement which has
been festering since the freshman
year-her physical education skill
test. With this hurdle out of the
way, she stands resigned to the in-!
exorable approach of graduation.

t

practice teaching semester with cnairman of tne Blue Team for
A.TED TO the fifth grade at University Frosh Weekend, then in its sec- t
POSSIBLE ond season. "We demolished 1
them," she recollects with the I
Architect Wins last remnants of the freshman t
exuberance which inundates the1
0TI:1Booth Fellowship campus with posters and noon-E
intments time diag antics in the latter_
Edward W. Hammarsjkald, '51, part of April.
of the architecture college has been Her sophomore year was rela-
awarded the $1,000 George G.
Booth Annual Traveling Fellow-
ship in Architecture for 1953.
VILL DeanrWell I. Bennett announced In Hill A ditoriun
Hammarskjold plans to leave
for Europe in June to study build- Four organ students of Robert
ing research in Europe and Eng- Noehren of the musicschool will
_____________land, give a public recital at 8:30 p.m.
today in Hill Auditorium.
Jane Townsend, '54SM. will play
Bach's "Fantasia and Fugue in G
minor," and Diane Meger, '56 will
play the "Allegro" from the First
Trio Sonata by Bach.
D nCK SBuxtehude's "Prelude and Fugu
in G minor" will be played by
OX 78 BATTLE CREEK, MICH. Richard Harper, Grad, and Bach's
"Chorale Prelude, Num komm der
Heilen Heiland" will be played by
Mary Catherine Hutchins, '53SM.
t Summer Job of All!
and earn substantial commissions qMORN
this popular dock.
_. °9ale

as seen in
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