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May 27, 1953 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1953-05-27

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Il

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 1953

4

THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

PAGE T'HMEE

PAGE THREE

i

_I-M_BRIEFS
By WARREN WERTHEIMER
WITH BUT A FEW days of competition remaining, the champions
of all divisions of the intramural athletic program have been
decided.
The winners of the respective divisions are as follows: Sigma
Phi Epsilon in the social fraternity class, Gomberg House in the
Residence Hall bracket, Nu Sigma Nu among the professional fra-
ternities, Newman Club in the independent section, the Turks in the
International Students division and Education in the faculty league.
These are the standings for the top ten teams in the Social
Fraternity and Residence Hall divisions:

SOCIAL FRATERNITY
1. Sigma Phi Epsilon (1648)
2. Sigma Chi (1615)
V 3. P1 Lambda Phi (1433)
4. Phi Delta Theta (1430)
5 Sigma Alpha Mu (1317)
6. Alpha Tau Omega (1196)
7. Lambda Chi Alpha (1187)
8. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (1175)
L 9. Kappa Sigma (1165)
10. Chi Psi (1104)

RESIDENCE HALLS
1. Gomberg (1600)
2. Allen-Rumsey (1485)
3. Cooley (1443)
4. Hinsdale (1301)
5. Hayden (1236)
6. Wenley (1215)
7. Strauss (1166)
8. Taylor (1100)
9. Michigan (1082)
10. Williams (1079)

The championship for Sigma Phi Epsilon was its fifth consecutive
intramural fraternity title. Although there are no figures kept on
something like this, it may be a national record. But whether this is
a record or not, the Sig Eps did set one new mark by racking up a
total of 1648 points for the year. The old record of 1579 set by the
Sig Eps during the 48-49 season was bettered not only by this year's
champs but also by Sigma Chi which finished 33 points behind the
winners.
The Sig Ep athletic manager was Joe LaRue, member of the
Michigan track team and he deserves a good part of the credit for the
success of the Hill Street fraternity. Although winning the cham-
pionship was a team effort with everybody in the house participating
in at least one sport, the man that would have to be singled out for
a large amount of praise would be Paddy Haas. Haas, who was one
of the top candidates for the award of All-Campus Athlete participated
in 16 sports and starred in most all of them.
Eight for Sigma Chi
DESPITE THE FACT that Sigma Phi Epsilon captured overall hon-
ors, it was only able to annex three of the twenty team titles.
Sigma Chi took the bulk of the trophies as it was victorious in eight
sports. The Sigma Chis won Football, Dual Swimming, both 'A' and
'B' Basketball, Relays, the Swim Meet, and Water Polo and tied for
"Outdoor Track. However where the Sig Eps added high finishes in
mbst sports to their victories in Volleyball, Bowling, and Golf, Sigma
Chi fell down in a number of sports.
Pi Lambda Phi, which closed fast to edge Phi Delta Theta for
third made off with the Paddleball and Baseball trophies. The Phi
Delts won their only trophy by taking the Indoor Track Meet. One
place further back was Sigma Alpha Mu, victorious in handball for
u the second straight year. The only other houses to win trophies were
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, triumphant in Foul Shooting and Wrestling, and
Kappa Sigma, winning Cross Country and tieing Sigma Chi for Out-
door Track.
In the Residence Hall division Gomberg House ran away with
the race and ended the season with a total of 1600 points, outdis-
tancing its nearest competitor by 115 tallies. The athletic manager
of Gomberg is Jim McClurg who not only directed its athletic
program, but also played on many of its teams.
The Gomberg success like the Sig Ep success was the result of team
cooperation by many. However the South Quadders also had their
star athlete; Don Peterson of Michigan football fame. Peterson, who
has been named the recipient of the All-Campus Athlete award was
most instrumental in leading the men of Gomberg to victory.
In the process of capturing the championship, Gomberg won both
'A and 'B'Basketball, Swimming, Golf, and Outdoor Track. Allen-
Rumsey which finished a distant second took home four trophies;
for Indoor Track, Relays, Wrestling, and Table Tennis. In the third
spot was Cooley House, winner of Tennis and Cross Country. Softball
was annexed by Hinsdale, the fourth place finisher and filling out
the top five was Hayden, titleholders in Handball and 'B' Bowling.
The other crowns were taken by Michigan, Football and Volleyball,
Chicago House, Water Polo and Foul Shooting, Anderson, 'A' Bowling,
Strauss, Horseshoes and Williams, Paddleball.
Newman Club Triumphs
THE INDEPENDENT division, Newman Club easily captured the'
title by winning Football, Track, Paddleball, Relays, Swimming, and
Softball, rolling up a total of 1163 points. In second place with 699 was
the Hawaiians, winners in Bowling and Tennis. A scant fie points
behind was Standish-Evans. Foul Shooting, Horseshoes, and Golf
went to the third place finishers. Rounding out the first five were
Lester Co-op and Men's Christian Fellowship.
The Professional Fraternity title went to Nu Sigma Nu with 1087
points. The Nu Sigs won Football, Volleyball, and Golf. They were
closely followed by the Law Club which captured only Table Tennis
in the process of tallying 1048 markers. Next came Phi Delta Phi, tri-
V umphant in Basketballand Tennis, Delta Sigma Delta, winner of
Swimming, and Alpha Kappa Kappa.
Education annexed the honors in the Faculty league. It was1
followed by Air Force, Economics, Willow Run Research, andt
Navy in that order.j
In the International Students Center division, the Turks finished
the season in first place. Next came the Arabs, the Chinese and thet
Japanese.z

Grid Ticket
Sale Begins
Next Monday
Beginning Monday, June 1, stu-
dents may make application for
tickets to all 1953 Michigan foot-
ball games, both home and away,
according to Ticket Manager Don
Weir.
This includes tickets for the
Michigan-Michigan; State game at
East Lansing November 14, and
contests at Illinois and Minnesota,
as well as the six contests sched-
uled at home.
* * *
EACH STUDENT automatically
receives one season ticket for the
home games at registration in the
fall. But those desiring more than
one ducat for home games or any
tickets at all for away games must
buy them at the regular price.
Ducats for the Minnesota, Illi-
nois, and Michigan State games
are $3.60 each. Tickets for home
games sell at $4.00 for a reserved
seat and $5.40 for a box seat.
Weir said that in order to in-
sure fair distribution, students will
be limited to orders of one ticket
apiece for the Michigan State
game. Any number may be order-
ed for other games.
* * *
THE TICKET manager pointed
out that, as usual, students are
getting the first chance to buy
tickets., Alumni and the general
public will not be permitted to
place orders until June 15, two
weeks after student sales begin.
Weir emphasized that the cur-
rent process is one of application
only. His office collects the money,
and files the orders in alphabetical
order until next fall. At that time
the tickets are mailed out, two
weeks prior to each game. If no
tickets are available, the appli-
cant draws a cash refund.
Students may make their appli-
cations, accompanied by cash, at
the Ferry Field Ticket Office be-
ginning Monday.

If any one reason for Michigan's
late spurt to its second straight
Big Ten baseball title could be giv-
en, it would have to be the phe-
n6menal hitting of leftflelder Paul
Lepley.
After dropping the first game of
a doubleheader at East Lansing
*lay 9, when their conference rec-
ord, fell to a lowly 5-3 mark, the
Wolverines swept five straight
loop victories to give them a cham-
pionship tie with Illinois and the
NCAA district four playoff bid.
* * *
..DURING that do-or-die stretch
sophomore Lepley powdered the
ball at a .555 clip, banging out 11
safeties in 22 times at bat.
The hot streak made Lepley
the team's leading batter at the
end of regular season play, with
Top Athlete
Don Peterson, former Mich-
igan varsity football hero, and
now a staff assistant in Gom-
berg House of the South Quad-
rangle, hastbeen chosen by Earl
Riskey as the outstanding in-
tramural athlete of the year.
Peterson was the mainstay
in the powerful athletic ma-
chine which carried Gomberg
to the dormitory championship.
lie participated in every house
sport except football, at which
he could not perform because
of previous varsity experience.
It was appropriate that in
this, the first year of graduate
student eligibilty, one of that
group captured the coveted
award. Intramural chief Riskey
pointed out that graduate stu-
dents had to compete for un-
dergraduate teams in order to
be considered for the award.

29 hits in 79 trips to the plate
for a .333 average.
The only other regular finishing
over the .300 mark was shortstop
Bruce Haynam, whose 24 for 79
record gives him a .304 average.
* *" *
PART-TIME centerfielder Bill
Billings compiled the highest av-
erage of anyone, at .346, but the
ex-gridder came to bat only 26
times.
The effectiveness of Lepley's
clouting was brought out last
weekend as Michigan faced the
necessity of winning three games
in Ann Arbor to remain in title
contention.
In Friday's 7-2 victory over
Northwestern the outfielder start-
ed off a three-run Wolverine sec-
ond-inning outburst with a tre-
mendous triple to right, singled
home the fourth tally in the sev-
enth frame, and added another
triple for good measure in the
fifth.
IN ADDITION Lepley cut off a
Badger run at the plate in the first
inning with a perfect throw from
his spot in left.
Saturday, in the first game of a
twin-bill with Northwestern, the
right handed hitter collected a!
pair of hits to drive in two runs,
including the winning tally in ai
3-2 Michigan decision. Then he
came back in the nightcap to close
out the regular season with three
hits as the 5-3 Maize and Blue
triumph clinched a share ofuthe
championship bunting for Coach
Ray Fisher's boys.
Fisher has been working the
team hard all this week in prepar-
ation for the weekend tussle with
the tough Mid-American Confer-
ence champs, Ohio University.
A pair of victories in the best-
of-three series would put the Wol-
verines in the NCAA finals for the
first time in history,

Outfielder Hits .511 as Michigan Sweeps
Five Straight Conference Diamond Wins

(Second in a series of articles Pre-
viewing the Big Ten Outdoor Track
and Field Championships to be held
this Friday and Saturday at Cham-
paign, Illinois.)
By KEN COPP
One of the best fields ever to-
gether at one time will be present
when the dash men assemble for
their respective races in the 100,
220, and 440 this week-end at the
Big Ten Outdoor Championships.
Willie Williams, outstanding
sprinter from Illinois, is defending
champion in the 220-yard dash
but has posted only the second
The Intramural Building will
be closed all day Saturday,
June 30.
-Earl Riskey
best time in that event so far this
year. Michigan State's Lou Var-
gha has recorded the best time
with a mark just onle second fast-
er than William's time.
VARGHA POSTED this time in
a dual meet with Penn State when
he ran the 220 in 21.5 seconds to
tie the State field record. It is in-
teresting to note that he tied this
record just a week after he had lost
to Williams in a dual meet with
the Illini.
Other top men in this field,
according to their best times,
are Harry Nash of Minnesota
and Michigan's Ross Coates
whose times are only a second
apart and just a shade back of
William's second-place effort.
Also in the 100-yard dash, Wil-
liam's is a top competitor and has
recorded the best time in the
Conference this year with a mark
of 9.4 seconds. Joe Corley, Wil-
I-M TENNIS
ALL-CAMPUS SINGLES FINALS
Tom Fabian beat Howie Willens
6-2, 3-6, 6-3
)Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

lam's teammate, is second in this
event with a good time of :9.6.
MICHIGAN'S Coates follows
Corley with a mark just a second
slower and then Minnesota's Nash
and Indiana's Fred Watson, fill
out the field of top men.
The 440-yard run provides a
field of competitors with very
creditable times and very close
ones. Michigan's captain Jack
Carroll has gone the distance in
a time, of 48.2 seconds which is
the best recorded this year.
However not to be counted out
of this race is State's Vargha who

Lepley's Clouting Sparks ITALENT GALORE:
Wolverine Drive to Title' Big Ten Boasts Top Field of Sprinters

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has recorded the third best confer-
ence time'in the 440'this spring,
Even though he stands behind Fes-
senden in times he whipped both
Fessenden and Siders sin a dual
meet with the Illini earlier this
month.
In the Western Conference mile
relay competition, Michigan leads
the field by a good margin. The
Wolverine quartet of Girant
Scruggs, Bill Barton, Dan Hick-
man, and Carroll, have posted the
very creditable time of 3:16:2
which is more than two seconds
better than the performance of
second place Illinois.

I

MEN'S TOGGERY says

'M' Big Ten Go
'By Inprovemne
By JACK HORWITZ
Consistent playing and signs of
vast improvement mark the golf-
ing season of Tad Stanford.
' Holding down a regular spot on
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer's golf
squad, the energetic young link-
ster has tried hard to fulfill the
requirements of a champion golf-
er. A newcomer on the links this
year, Stanford has virtually in-
sured a nucleus for the golf squad
next season.
* * *
STANFORD'S golfing back-
ground dates back to his high
school days. He played for Mid-
land High School where his golf-
ng career covered four years. Dur-
ing that time the Midland team
annexed three state champion-
ships and was runner-up for the
other.
Playing on the same team with
Wolverine golfer Jack Stumfig,
Stanford turned in some impres-
sive scores to aid his team's ef-
fort. In addition to winning four
varsity letters in golf, he was
awarded three varsity letters in
football and basketball at Mid-
land.
Stanford started playing golf
at the age of ten when his father
took him out on the course with
him. He quickly adapted himself
to the game and worked hard to
improve.
* * *
STANFORD hasn't had much
time for golf during the past sum-
mers but managed to enter two;

)lf Hopes Lifted
ntt of Stanford
big amateur tournaments. He play-
ed in the Junior Chamber of Com-
merce tournaments in which he
reached the national playoffs. In
the United States Golf Association
Junior tournaments, he was elim-
inated in the second round by a
former Michigan captain, Dean
Lind.

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On the spring southern trip
this year, Stanford played in
both matches and performed
creditably. Against the Tar Heels
of North Carolina, he teamed
with Captain Hugh Wright to
sweep the doubles play.
In a quadrangular meet, the
match with Purdue was virtually
won by the steady swinging Stan-
ford. Purdue and Michigan were
tied 161/-16'/2, with only Stan-
ford out on the course. His final
round of 77 captured three points
from his opponent to give the Wol-
verines the victory.
Stanford plays the starting end
spot on the Michigan grid team,
but gave up spring practice in
favor of the links. He has been
averaging 78 a round and with the
Big Ten Championship approach-
ing, his steady improvement will
aid the Michigan Linksters in their
quest for the title.
In addition to his athletic vir-
tues, Stanford is a member of both
Sphinx and Michigamua. He is
president of Alpha Delta Phi fra-
ternity and is a member of Phi
Eta Sigma, freshman honorary. He
has also received the Yost Award
for proficiency in scholarship and
athletics..

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.ajor League
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NATIONAL
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St. Louis ...... .20
Philadelphia .,..17
New York .......19
Pittsburgh ......12
Chicago .........11
Cincinnati......9

LEAGUE
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11 .656
13 .606
14 .588
13 .567
16 .543
21 .364
20 .355
21 .300

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CHORAL UNION CONCERTS
ROBERTA PETERS, Soprano, October 7; BOSTON SYMPHONY, October 22;
VIRTUOSI DI ROMA, November 2; VLADIMIR HOROWITZ, Pianist,
November 21; De PAUR'S INFANTRY CHORUS, November 24;
TORONTO SYMPHONY, February 10; PAUL BADURA-SKODA, Pianist,
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Milwaukee 6, Cincinnati 0
St. Louis 6-2, Chicago 3-3
Only games scheduled
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (2-twi-
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New York at Brooklyn (night)-
Hearn (3-3) vs. Erskine (4-2)
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Rush (1-5) vs. Wilson (2-2)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (night)-
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Raffensberger (1-4) or Nuxhall (1-1)
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