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May 21, 1953 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-21

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Gargoyle

Gives

Competition

to SL Bucket

Drive

THE SL'S FREE UNIVERSITY OF BERLIN BUCKET DRIVE, OPENING YESTERDAY, RAN INTO
REPRESENTATIVE, THE POTENTIAL MAGAZINE BUYER CO NTRIBUTED HIS
GARG AND A BUCKET DRIVE TAG. THE

-ualy-Don uampbell
COMPETITION WITH GARGOYLE SALESMEN. ABOVE, A GARG HAWKER LAUNCHED HIS CAMPAIGN SPIEL, BUT AT THE URtGING OF A BUCKET DRIVE
QUARTER TO THE FUND. THE GARGOYLE SALESMEN SUCCEEDED IN MAKING THE SALE HOWEVER, AND THE' CUSTOMER LEFT WITH A
BERLIN DRIVE WILL CONTINUE TODAY. SL REPORTS THAT $600 WAS COLLECTED IN THE DRIVE.

,_..

TRUCE & THE GOP
See Page 4

C I
4c

Sir eiina
Latest Deadline in the State

at

r-
t I
SHOWERS, COOLER

9

VOL. LXIII, No. 161 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 1953

SIX PAGES

SL Passes
Senior Class
Rule Change
Pep Rally Group
Structure Altered
Student Legislature last night
voted to change the constitution
of the senior board of University
colleges and altered membership
in the Central Pep Rally Com-
mittee.
The amendment to the Senior
Board's constitution, which still
requires approval of the Student
Affairs Committee to become ef-
fective, is aimed at clarifying elec-
tion rules for senior class officers.
It would require that rules govern-
ing senior class elections for each
college be approved by the Senior
Board.
CHANGES IN the composition
of the Central Pep Rally Com-
mittee now remove SL's voting ma-
jority and add to the group one
representative each from the
cheerleaders, the marching band
and a junior member of the Board
in Control of Athletics.
SL's representation on the
committee was reduced from
three to two members. SL's
treasurer, 'who will keep his
position on the committee, will
continue to exercise final con-
trol over all the group's finan-
cial matters.
The change in composition,
passed after lengthy debate and
the defeat of a substitute motion,
will partially alter the function of
the Central Committee from a
strictly policy-making body to one
which concerns itself with mark-
ing preparations for the rallies as
well, legislators claimed.
Opponents of the bill argued
that policy decisions and practical
planning for the rallies should re-
main functions of separate groups,
while those in favor of the by-
law change considered it more ex-
pedient to combine functions in a
coordinated committee.
A REPORT of the House Elec-
tion Rules Committee, which is
attempting to find a solution to
problems concerning conflicts be-
tween campaigns for SL elections
and house rules was postponed un-
tilra fall meeting of the legisla-
ture.
Also passed at the meeting was
a motion to add the office of
comptroller to SL's secretariat.
The position was created to re-
lieve the treasurer of the work
of keeping daily accounts of the
legislature's receipts and expen-
ditures. Hank Crapo,'54, was ap-
pointed to the newly-createdl
post.
Other appointments made ati
the meeting include Hank Berliner,<
'54, President of the Cinema Guildt
Board and Carol Lee Franknsteen,
'55, chairman of the SL secretar-
iat.
Interviewing for the salariedE
position of manager of the Cinema
Guild Board will begin at 9:30
a.m. Saturday in the SL Bldg.t

Oatis Denies Spy
Charges b Reds
By The Associated Press
Associated Press Correspondent William N. Oatis said yesterday
he never, spied for the American embassy while he was a newspaper-
man in Czechoslovakia.
The White House also announced yesterday that President Eisen-

hower had offered

to negotiate the sanctions imposed on C7echoslo-
'vakiabecause of the imprisonment

Burton Bells,
Fail To Toll
The faithful striking of the Bur-
ton Tower carillon, usually pas-
sively accepted by students as a
signal-for the beginning of classes,
was not heard yesterday.
For reasons which have not been
ascertained the carillon will re-
main silenced for the next month.
Percival Price, University Caril-
lonneur, who has been serenading
the campus with his symphonic
chimes of late, could offer no ex-
planation for the sudden move. j
Neither music school or plant
'department officials contacted so
far can give any information to
help clear up the mystery of the
suddenly silent chimes.
Throughout the day, however,
Price continued to play selections
on the carrillon. Probably due to
this, few students missed the hour-
ly chimes heard every other day
throughout the year. 11

of William Oatis two weeks before
the Czechs released him.
CZECHOSLOVAK President An-
tonin Zapotocky immediately no-
tified Eisenhower that he was re-
leasing Oatis.
The exchange of correspond-
ence between the two executives
on March 30 was made public by
the White House.
The message by President Eisen-
hower to Zapotocky said in part:
"If your government will release
Mr. Oatis, removing the obstacles
which his continued imprisonment
places in the way of their solution,.
the United States government on
its part is prepared to negotiate
on the basis of full mutual under-
standing the issues arising from
the arrest of Mr. Oatis and now
outstanding between us."
Oatis said in a statement that he
checked news tips he received with
the embassy on occasions.
"But at no time did I act as an
espionage agent of the embassy
in the sense that this term is un-
derstood in Western countries
within the range of my experi-
ence."

Receipts Tax
Passed, Sent
To Governor
Party conflicts
PrecedIe Votino
LANSING - (AP) - The $32,000,-
000 business receipts tax passed
the House yesterday over bitter,
Democratic protests, and the Leg-
islature was ready to extend the
session to force Gov. Williams to
approve it.
The four-mill levy on business,
professional and farm receipts was
bludgeoned through the House 53-
43 with 10 Republicans joining all
the Democrats present in voting
against it.
* * *
THE PROPOSED new budget-
balancing tax had cleared the Sen-
ate on almost as sha-ky a majority
on Tuesday. An immediate effect
vote 'was squeaked out in the
Senate. The House had already
given the bill immediate effect
nearly a month ago when it sent
it to the Senate as a personal in-
come tax. r
Meanwhile, the Republican
leadership, angered at what it
called "Democratic obstruction-
ism," had introduced a res-
olution cancelling tomorrow's
scheduled adjournment and re-
cessing until June 4.
In the recess, all the budget bills
containing appropriations to run
the state after June 30 will be left
dangling over Williams' head.
He was put on notice that the
Legislature would take no more
action on the appropriations un-
til he acted on the tax bill.

New Policy
Inaugurating a new policy of
showing films on Thursday,
Friday, Saturday. and Sunday
the Student Legislature Cinema
Guild will present John Ford's
Academy Award winner. "How
Green Was My Valley" at 7 and
9 p.m. today thru Saturday and
at 8 p.m. Sunday in the Archi-
tecture Auditorium.
Starring Walter Pidgeon,
Maureen O'Hara, Barry Fitz-
gerald, and Donald Crisp, this
film which rated seven Acade-
my Awards will be shown with
the Guild's new projecting
equipment.
Williams
*7N N
On Camps
View'sPlay
"I've enjoyed this play more
than any of my own," remarked
Tennessee Williams last night aft-
er he suddenly dropped into -Ann
Arbor to view the second perform-
ance of "In the Summer House."
Williams a r r i v e d here yes-
terday to see the Jane Bowles' play
which he had enjoyed after a first
reading. Commenting on this first
production, he said that it was{
"perfect" and needed "absolutely

House Votes
To Increase
Soil Subsidy
Senate Slashes
One Money Bill
By The Associated Press
The House jolted the Eisenhow-,
er adiinistration's economy drive
yesterday by approving 55 mil-'
lion dollars more for 1954 soil cony
servation payments to farmers
than the President had requested.
Then it passed and sent to the
Senate a $712,747,828 Agriculture
Department money bill for the fis-
cal year starting July 1, 1953.
* r
THE Senate, meanwhile, passed
its first regular 1954 money bill of
the session yesterday after voting
floor cuts totalling about 10% mil-
lion dollars.
As finally approved, the inde-
pendent offices measure carries
about 446 million dollars to run
22 government commissions and
agencies in the fiscal year start-
ing July 1.
This is about six million less
than the House voted and about
110% million less than the Senate
Appropriations Committee Ap-
proved in sending the measure to
the floor.
In their battle for a six-month
extension of the excess profits'
tax Eisenhower forces took a long
stride forward yesterday.
CHAIRMAN Reed (R-NY) of
the powerful House Ways and
Means Committee agreed to hold
hearings on President Eisenhow
er's proposal to keep the tax on
the books for another six months.
It is scheduled to die June 30 un-
less extended by Congress.
Officers Chosen
By Honor Councill
The Engineering Honor Coun-
cil elected Tawfig Khoury, '54,
president and Keith Coats, '56,
secretary of the organization at a
meeting last night.
New members to be installed
were Anne Campbell, '55, William
Horne, '54, and Guy Moulthrop.

Auto Strikes May
Lay Off 150,000
Ford Tops List of Plants Hit;
55,000 Detroit Jobs Threatened
By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Nearly 150,000 auto workers were idled or facing idle-
ness yesterday as a result df strikes at three supplier plants.
Topping the swelling list were 85,000 Ford Motor Co. employes
which the company said it would be forced to lay off within the next
five days because of a month-long tieup at its Canton, O., plant.
* * * *
ALSO AFFECTED OR threatened by other stoppages were
Chrysler, Studebaker and Willys.

Police, 'U' Officials Say

A rb Causes Little Trouble oE concRiliator movelby
Son~eP.ociHaRory Jovyphilpos-d
ing a legislative "watchdog" com-
By TOM LADENDORF mittee to study the operation of
yTMADOIdhhill malr, rnmrnrln

In Detroit Chrysler sent 27,-
000 workers home yesterday, at-
tributing its action to a juris-
dictional strike involving 8,000
workers at the Budd Co., a local
body stamping plant. The Budd
strike, if it continues, could also
affect Ford, Nash and Stude-
baker.
Most of the employes will be
laid off during the next five days.
The company said "the enforced'
layoff" got under way late yes-
terday at the big Rouge plant here.
IN A STATEMENT, Ford said
the strike at Canton had cut off
forgings and parts used in Ford
cars and trucks and Mercury cars.
The CIO United Auto workers
called the strike nearly five weeks
ago in a dispute over job rates,
the company said.
The shutdown of most of
Ford's manufacturing and as-
sembly operations will affect
55,000 in the Detroit area, in-
cluding 43,100DatrtheRouge
plant.
Ford said the strike at Canton
has exhausted supplies of forgings
and parts and "the pipe lines sup-
plying them to Ford plants around
the country are almost empty.
"The strike remains unsettled
although the dispute has narrow-
ed down to a question of rates af-
fecting only nine employes," Ford'
said.
.Daily.Business
Staff Holds
Award Banquet
Thirty-six members of The Daily
business staff were given awards
last ;night in recognition of out-
standing service during the se-
mester.
Inaugurated this year, the
awards were presented at a ban-
quet held at the Union.
Sophomore members of the staff
receiving honorary keys were Ann
Burkat. '56, Ruth Cohen, '56, Peter
Cooper, '56, Shirley Diamond, '55,
June Golten, '56, Coralie Harper,
'55, Helen Klein, '55, Joan Kramer,
'55 Laura Lee Michelson, '56, Jim
Mills, '55, Lois Mishelow, '56, Mary
Jean Monkoski, '55, Lois Pollak,
'56, Elaine Smith, '55 and Ralph
St. John, '56.
Tryouts who received the

I

'U'Concert

To Feature
250 Voices
Two hundred and fifty voices
will sing two major works in the
annual University Choir Spring
Concert at 8:30 p.m. today in Hill
Auditorium.
Renditions of two movements
from Stravinsky's "Symphonie de
Psaumes" and Mozart's "Requiem"
will highlight the concert. The
group will also present musical
styles from the 16th century to
contemporary works.
INCLUDED IN the list of dis-
tinguished contemporary composi-
tions are Bartok's "Slovak' Folk
Song" and #indemith's "The Doe,"
which will be sung by the Tudor
Singers, a select group of 24
voices from the choir.
The Michigan Singers, a group
of 60 voices from the choir, will
also present two other contem-
porary numbers "Hymn to King
Stephen" by Kodaly, and "Exul-
tate Deo" by Poulenc.
Featured soloists for the concert
will be Ruth Orr, Grad., soprano,
Charles Green, '54SM, tenor and
Robert Kerns, '54SM, baritone.
All three students have been solo-
ists in operas presented by the
music school and the speech de-
partment.
Making her debut as contralto
soloist will be Mary Roosa, '54SM
who recently enrolled in the Uni-
versity.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
TOKYO-Lt. Gen. William K.
Harrison. chief Allied truce nego-
tiator and the top United Nations
commander in the Far East, Gene
Mark~lark, huddled yesterday for
the fourth straight day on report-
ed modifications in an Allied plan
to crack the prisoner' exchange
deadlock and end the Korean War.
T~n~nX Pima Min te

The arb never seems to hurt anyone.
Nichols Arboretum, the vast expanse of hills and trees east of
the University Hospital, while known to University students as a long
awaited for spring picnic site, reportedly gives officials very little
trouble.
CAPTAIN .ROLAND Gainsley of the Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment, said yesterday, "While a shortage of manpower prevents us
from patrolling the arb on foot, we have scout cars driving through
the arboretum roads every few
hours, checking cars and anything E T ISSUES
suspicious." IJ.17711 ISSU ES
"We get a few minor com-
plaints about noisy parties and
prowlers once in a while, but P o l cI
generally have little to complain
about in that section."
Gainsley's report concurred with By ZANDER
that of Dean of Men Walter B. A warning to Americans wh
Rea, who said that while he does Soviet proposals to permit unificat
get complaints about noisy parties to neutralize German military pot
in the arb, he receives few reports K. Pollock in an interview yesterd;
of serious trouble from the dis- Prof. Pollock, a long-time go
trict. affairs, said that German troops w
Dean Rea added, "During the ern plans for the defense of the N
war we used to have trouble with free world-against possible Soviet a!
groups of high school students and * *
itinerant workers going through WITHOUT GERMAN forces; V
the arb, making it dangerous for department warned, NATO and F
our students at night. However would be "utterly ineffective."
this has qucietedI down now."U-.. a_.

te Me U1 IU 1l1 C C;llle a-

tions foi changes next year if
needed.
Williams was entirely non-
committal on how he was going
to act.
When the bill came up for the
House vote, debate was choked off
almost at, once by majority lead-
er Phillips.

-Daily-Jeff Pemberton
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
no revision."
Williams, the author of the Pul-
itzer Prize winning play, "A Street-
car Named Desire," had no com-
ment on his immediate plans but
indicated that he would tour the
campus today.'

WARNING:
Discusses German Unification

HOLLANDER
o look with favor upon rumored
ion of Germany if the West agrees
ential was sounded by Prof. James'
ay.
vernmental consultant in German
ere vital to the realization of West-
orth Atlantic Pact nations and the
ttack.
* *
;he chairman of the political science
European Defense Command plans

"It would be optimistic to look for French ratification before
late summer or early fall. This is bad-the traditional time for
launching European invasions is, July or August."
Prof. Pollock believes that French reluctance in this instance, is.
aimed at coaxing still greater concessions from the United States
and the other allies, probably "bailing the French out of the mess
they have made in Indo-China." -
DISCOUNTING SPECULATION over whether the Soviets would
make the rumored proposals vis-a-vis German neutrality officially,
Prof, Pollock agreed with the stand taken by President Eisenhower
calling for tangible proof of Soviet peaceful intentions.
A Soviet move which would be an important signal of sin-

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