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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 08, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-08

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P^= lfGETE

THE MICH IGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1953

1 1

KISSING AND SIAMESE TWINS:
Aquarium Features Unique Fish

Ay JON SOBELOFF
Who'd kiss a fish?
A kissing gourami would.
THE GOURAMI, a fish itself,
isn't being affectionate when it
carries on its underwater oscula-
tion. It uses the peculiar "kissing"
action of its mouth t6 eat algae.
One of the "57 varieties" of
fish sold by the University
Aquarium, hungry gouramis
sometimes seek algae on each
others' mouths. They may get
stuck together this way for as
long as 15 or 20 minutes.
Ranging from popular and rela-
tively inexpensive angel fish, black
mollies, guppies and zebra fish to a
rare $65 dollar discus fish which is
practically round and looks some-
thing like a large angel fish, the
Aquarium's stock contains items
for fish lovers-novice or inveter-
ate.
The Aquarium is the unusual
and thriving enterprise of Ed
Shafter of the speech department
and Mrs. Shafter and Frank Bou-
wsma of the speech department
and Mrs. Bouwsma.
OTHER UNUSUAL fish featured
at the aquarium are a knife fish
which can swim backward or for-
ward because of its peculiar fin
and tail arrangement, a fish that
jumps out of the water to deposit
English Honor
Plan Offers
Intense Study
Small classes, individual tutor-
ing with a member of the English
department faculty and an exten-
sive study of English literature are
offered to academically qualified
students in the English Honors
Program.
The Honors Program consists of
four lecture courses in English lit-
erature from Chaucer to contem-
porary writers and two seminars
in criticism. In the second year of
the program, the student is ex-
pected to write a critical essay and
take a comprehensive exam.
The acceptance of approximate-
ly 30 students a year into the pro-
gram makes small classes pos-
sible. English honors are awarded
to the best of these at garduation:
Last year, twelve out of nineteen
graduates from the program re-
ceived honor degrees.
Sophomores interested in the
program may consult Prof. Carlton
F. Wells, concentration advisor, be-
fore the end of the semester.

Alumii Plan
'U' Reunion
Ann Arbor mailmen, class offi-
cers and the Alumni Association
have been busy during the last
few weeks making plans for the
annual Reunion Weekend which
will begin June 11.
Graduates of classes from 1903
to 1948 returning to the Univer-
sity, will be encouraged to enroll
in the Alumni University, a tra-
ditional feature of the alumni re-
unions running from June 8 to 12.
The purpose of the Alumni Uni-
versity is to keep interested adults
informed of recent trends in sci-
ences and arts.
Members of the University fa-
culty will conduct a series of short
courses designed to provide alum-
ni with a basic knowledge and sti-
mulus for further study in new
fields.
Some of the classes will be
leasing fraternity houses for the
Reunion Weekend.

HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISTS:

Students

*.
WillTour 'U
TWriters Will Visit Campus
For 26th MIPA Conference
More than 1400 student journalists from 63 Michigan high schools
are expected to invade the campus today for the 26th annual Michi-
gan Interscholastic Press Association convention.
Sponsored by the journalism department, the MIPA convention
is the oldest high school journalism day in the state.

I

-Daily-Don Campbell
NO FISH STORY-$65 APIECE

* * *

<">--

m x V
its eggs on a piece of slate and at
extremely rare "siamese twin" fish.
The jumping Copeina Arnoldi
uses its tail every 30 sectnds, flips
water onto the slate where its
eggs are deposited as it swims
by,sfeigning unconcern, to mis-
lead other fish which it fears
may eat the eggs before they ma-
ture and drop into the water.
The "siamese twins," guppies,
have lived for three weeks and may
be kept alive although one of the
bottom-to-bottom attached pair
invariably swims on the top get-
ting much more food than his up-
side-down twin.
"FISH ARE interesting and nice
for' kids because they teach the
children responsibility," Mrs. Shaf-
ter claims.
For about $12, the beginning
collector of tropical fish can buy
a" two gallon tank, necessary ac-
cessories and a small assortment
of fish. A ten gallon tank with
about five or six breeding pair,
considered a more practical
starting arrangement, costs
about $20.
The fish require a constant 75
to 80 degree temperature, and can
be fed cooked unsalted potato, egg
yolk, bits of meat, spinach or pab-
lum, white worms, or prepared
commercial foods.
Also on display at the aquarium
are alligators, turtles and aquar-
ium supplies such as plants and
snails.

r____- - -

----

Michigan Christian Fellowship
invites each of you to its
SPRING PICNIC
Saturday, May 9 Lake Huron State Park
2:30 P.M. - 8:00 P.M.
Bus leaving front of Lane Hall 2:00 P.M.
SPORTS - FOOD - FUN
International Students especially invited.
"A Chapter of Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship"'

STUDENT WRITERS and their advisors will meet in the Rackham
Bldg. to study the question of "The School Community in Today's
World'.' Guy Nunn, Detroit radio news analyst, will deliver the key-
note address dealing with "Interpreting the Day's News," at 9:30 a.m.
In competition for the Donal Hamilton Haines Memorial
Award, the young journalists will do an "on the spot" coverage of
Dunn's talk.
* * * *
HIGH ON THE DAY'S schedule is a tour around campus to the
Student Publications Bldg. which houses The Michigan Daily, Michi-
ganensian, Gargoyle and Generation.
Published six times a week, the 63-year-old Daily is the oldest
college newspaper in continuous existence.,
The yearbook with the unpronounceable name, often shortened
to 'Ensian, began 55 years ago when three inter-college magazine staffs
merged their efforts.
Since then it has grown to a 500-page professional-looking year-
book.
* * * * .
THE NEWEST literary creation on campus is Generation, a quar-
terly magazine devoted to literature, music, visual art, architecture and
the dance.
Gargoyle has reared its head at the University for 42 years and
from current reports, the quarterly appears to be thriving on its
" diet of campus humor.
..1: ,"," Also printed in the Publications
Bldg. is the Michigan Journalist,
a monthly experimental newspa-
.{_ r>:} .} .: per written by students in the
.{z . journalism department.

V,

t

'U' STUDENTS CHAT BETWEEN CLASSES IN FRONT
OF THE LIBRARY

1953 DRAMA SEASON
Opening Play - May 11-16
DIRECT FROM ITS TRIUMPHANT N. Y. RUNI
KATHARINE CORNELL
with
ROBERT FLEMYNG JOHN EMERY
IN SOMERSET MAUGHAM'S BRILLIANT COMEDY
MARGERY MAUDE GERTRUDE MUSCROVE
EVA LEONARD - BOYNE CLAUDE HORTON
Staged by GUTHRIE McCLINTIC
SINGLE ADMISSIONS ON SALE TOMORROW 10 A.M.
Prices: Evenings $3.60, $3.00, $2.50-Matinees $2.00
GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE MON. and TUES. NIGHTS
Box Office Hours 10 A.M. - 5 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

1
y-

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

PROF. DONAL HAINES

JOURNALISM PROF. KENNETH STEWART TEACHES A BEGINNING REPORTING CLASS

-.W

Drive Right Out
to the
LOG CABIN INN

"EXTENDED PLAY"

for quick, efficient
curb service.

I

ZP

2045 PACKARD RD.
2 blocks past Stadium Blvd.

Bolero by Andre Kostelanetz; Caruso sings
Five Famous Arias; Marion Anderson Sings
Spirituals and Schubert Songs; Swan Lake;
Haydn's "Toy" Symphony by Boston Sym-
phony; Walter Gieseking plays Grieg's Lyric
Pieces.

11

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45 RPM RECORDS
Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Or-
mandy plays: Prokofiev's Classical Sym-
phony; Rhapsody in Blue with Oscar Levant;
Alfven's Swedish Rhapsody; and Strauss
Waltzes. Toscanini and the NBC Orchestra
play: Danse Macabre; Grofe's On the Trail.
SAVEALMOST 40%
Boston Pops plays: Tchaikovsky's Marche
Slave; Rosenkavalier Waltzes; Faust Waltz-
es; "Jalousie" and other favorites.
15 MINUTES OF PLAY
Metropolitan Opera Stars Sing Highlights
from La Traviata; La Boheme; Madame But-
terfly; Porgy and Bess. Rise Stevens sings
"Carmen" selections; Jan Peerce sings Five
Italian Arias; Lily Pons Sings the Bell Song
and Helen Traubel sings Wagner.

THE NIGHT DESK, WHERE DAILY COPY IS EDITED, BUSY AT WORK

PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
BECKY CONRAD
Pictures by
MALCOLM SCHATZ
and
Courtesy of News Service

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S T Y L I NG0

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mighty rugged - and are! Yet they're only half the
weight of regular shoes. Perfect knockabout shoe for
beach or country. Several sun-kissed shades. You'll
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I

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