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May 06, 1953 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-06

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 1953

i

Co-Op Housing Celebrates 21st

Year'

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Units Find Unique Solution
To Household Management
By DOROTHY MYERS
The University's six co-operative student houses, now celebrating
their 21st anniversary, have found a unique solution to the problems
of administering and managing a housing unit.
Residents of the co-ops set up their own governing bodies, which
consist of accountants, purchasers and house managers as well as the
traditional house president and secretary. The officers do all the
buying and accounting necessary for each house, while other resi-
dents spend five hours a week on assigned house duties, such as fixing
meals, washing dishes and cleaning rooms. In this manner, the stu-
dents manage to cut room and board expenses to about $12 a week.
TO AID THE SIX campus units function as efficiently as possible
an Inter-Cooperative Council was set up to purchase food for the
houses from whoesale dealers, to take care of major house repairs and
to place applicants who wish to live in a co-op.
Principles by which the co-ops govern themselves are demo-
cratic control, neutrality in religion and politics and continuous
expansion of the co-op organization.
Open membership accounts for the large number of foreign stu-
dents now living in the houses. Fifteen per cent of co-op residents come
* * * \from countries outside North
America.
In addition to organizing them-
selves, the University's co-ops serve
as headquarters for a league of 550
student cooperatives in the United
States and Canada. The North
American Student Cooperative
League, with a membership of
more than 50,000 students, acts as
a coordinating and servicing body
for member units'
One of NASCL's main tasks is
to help co-ops throughout the
country exchange solutions to
problems of governing and man-
aging student-run housing ven-
tures.
NASCL also publishes "Co-ops
s' on Campus," a magazine which at-
tempts to integrate member units
and aids in the exchange of sug-
OLICY DISCUSSION gestions.

(Continued from Page 4)
The International Committee of the
Student Legislature will meet in the
Conference Room of the Women's Lea-
gue Thurs., May 7, at 3:10 p.m. All
those interested are invited to at-
tend.
Roger Williams Guild, "Yoke Fellow-
ship" meets in the Prayer Room of
the First Baptist Church at 7 a.m.
Thursday. We breakfast and are through
by 8.
Christian Science Organization. Tes-
timonial meeting Thurs., May 7, at 7:30,
Fireside Room, Lane Hall.
h

International Center Weekly Tea for
foreign students and American friends
from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Thurs., May 7.
Congregational Disciple Guild. Discus-
sion on "Christianity and the Major
Academic Disciples" at the Guild
House, 6:45 p.m.
The Undergraduate Botany Club meets
with Bob Whitmire's Trees and Shrubs
Class on Saturday morning, May 9.
Meet at 2023 Natural Science Building
at 9:45 a.m. The trip'will be to Sagi-
naw Forest. If you need or can pro-
vide transportation, call Elizabeth
Brede, 6043 Alice Lloyd Hall, 3-1561.

STUDENT 'HOUSEMOTHER' CHECKS GROCERIES
AASW To Hold
ReceptionToday
A reception will be given for'
University and high school stu-
dents interested in social work by t
the Huron Valley Chapter of the
American Association of Social
Workers at 4:30 p.m. today in the'
Rackham Ballroom, ?
FAMOUS DROSTE and{
LINDT CHOCOLATE
plus
BEST FOOD ON CAMPUS
at
Lumbard's University Drug TIM
ty 9 TIME OUT

N OW the Finest in
SPORT COAT'S
TAILORED TO MEASURE
formerly $45 to $50
Only ~~
9-
$400
Also a Full Choice
at $38.50
Anything you want in Sport Coats--we have it.
Rich, soft fabrics in mild hues or vivid plaids
. woolens, tweeds, flannels and other choice
materials.
IINKER~iOc
KAHN TAILVREU CLVTHES
613 E. William St.

f

A

FURNACE MUST BE FED TOO

E. J. Soop Elected
Extension Chief
Everett J. Soop, director of the
University Extension Service, was
elected president of the National
University Extension Association
yesterday, for a one year term ef-
fective immediately.

TOPPER
Now Open 24 hrs. a day
and remodeled for
your convenience.

.4

n _.

PUZZLED ABOUT THAT _
Mother's Day Gift.
Just shop at the store
~that has everything"
Mother can use,
Chester Robert GIFTS
312 South State a
f <-- {=<- >! s-- "C0<-->0<-- r O<--><-?<-y --ye--yt) }--yo ( d

RADIO, TV FESTIVAL:
Students Stage Experiment

J

II T

4

The first Radio and Television
Festival will be presented by the
Departnment of Speech at 7;30
.m. tomorrow in Rm. 231 An-
;ell Hall.
The program will begin with a
emonstration of binaural radio,
n experiment giving an added
epth and proximity of sound by

use of two microphones,
transmission systems and
speakers.

two
two

Advanced radio and television
students have combined their
efforts for the experiment. In-
cluded will be an adaptation of
Walter Von Tilburg Clark's
drama "The Portable Phono-
graph," by Bob Foshko, '53.
The second program will com-

Don't you want to try a cigarette
with a record like this?
1. THE QUALITY CONTRAST between Chesterfield and other leading cigarettes is
a revealing story. Recent chemical analyses give an index of -good quality for the
country's six leading cigarette brands.
The index of good quality table - a ratio of high sugar to low nicotine -
shows Chesterfield quality highest
.. . 15% higher than its nearest competitor and Chesterfield quality 31% higher than
the average of the five other leading brands.

j

*

s

lo

4

2. First to Give You Premium
Quality in Regular and
King-size .. . much milder
with an extraordinarily good
taste- and for your pocketbook,
Chesterfield is today's best
cigarette buy.
3. A Report Never Before
Made About a Cigarette.
For well over a year a medical

k

specialist has been giving a
group of Chesterfield smokers
wci.. 1,.... v i I A4. t\ 1

r

regular examinations
every two months. He reports
... no adverse effects to
una.thrat and sinuses

) I

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