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May 03, 1953 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-03

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PAGE SMX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 3, 1953

KINCAID AND THE YOGI:
Versatility Adds Spice to Life of Flutist
- - - -

Stan Swinton

MICHIGAN WON, 10-6:

Sees

Victory

By BECKY CONRAD
First chair flutist for the Phil-
adelphia Orchestra, William Kin-
caid may not be a yogi addict who
suspends himself in midair, but he
can double up his legs and walk
on his knees, no mean feat for a
58-year old.
"But this is only a parlor-and-
special-occasion trick," he ex-
plained, "because you must be cor-
rectly attired in sport' clothes or
it wears out the trouser knees."
THE SIX-FOOT tall, white-
haired flutist learned this accom-
plishment from a Japanese nurse
as a child in the Hawaiian Islands.
Kincaid spent ten years in the
Islands where his father was a
Presbyterian minister. Destined
to become the flutist generally
conceded tops in his field, Kin-
caid picked up the rudiments of
flute-playing in Honolulu.
Honolulu was hometown number
two for the Minneapolis-born flut-
1st. His family left for the Ameri-
can possession when he was three
years old and Kincaid swears that
he can remember vividly the de-
tails of the Pacific crossing and his
arrival.
From the Islands Kincaid moved
to home number three near Char-
lottesville, Va. Kincaid often
makes short jaunts during tours
back to his 212-year-old family
homestead, Hatton Grange, a
rambling Southern mansion with
five hundred acres along the banks
of the James river in Albemarle
County.
KINCAID'S interests are many
and varied, but gambling and card-
playing do not number among
them. "Cards bore me, but I like
to watch people throw their money
away gambling, although I just
can't see the point of it myself."
He quit bridge-playing 35
years ago when the game became
infested with too many experts.
Now and then on the special
Orchestra train he'll sit in on a
hand of pinochle, "but only for
20 minutes, or so.
"I find it more interesting to sit
and look out the window or read
a book. I like biographies, especial-
ly autobiographies, and tours pro-
vide the only chance for me to
read."
KINCAID'S platinum flute,
made by Verne Q. Powell of Bos-
ton for the '1939 World's Fair in
New York, is one of seven of its
kind in the world. "And the dif-
ference between a platinum instru-
ment and the ordinary silver flute
is $5,000. Another difference is
that since platinum is denser than
silver, it doesn't vary as much with
temperature changes."'
Commenting on the worth of
Jazz in the modern music world,
Student Orator
AwardedBond
Richard Pinkerton, '55, has won
a $100 defense bond in the fresh-
man-sophomore division of the
Detroit Times sponsored "Tourna-
ment of Orators" held in Detroit
this week, it was announced re-
cently.
Defeating n i n e contestants
from Michigan colleges, Pinkerton
will compete Thursday with senior
division victor Guy Vander Jacht
from Hope College to determine
the representative in the zone con-
test.
The topic for the contest's pre-
liminary rounds which were held
in the University Speech Depart-
ment last week, was "John Mar-
shall, Frontiersman, Soldier, Dip-
lomat, Statesman and Jurist."

Heller To Lecture
On Architecture
Prof. Catherine Heller of the
College of Architecture and De-
sign will give an illustrated talk
on contemporary South American
Architecture and furniture and de-
sign, tomorrow, at 4 p.m. at the
architecture Auditorium.
Prof. Heller attended the 8th an-
nual Congress of Architecture at
Mexico City where she had the op-
portunity to view the new Uni-
versity City which is built entirely
upon lava.
Exhibit To Open
An exhibit featuring drawing,
painting, architecture, city plan-
ning and landscape design by stu-
dents in the College of Architec-
ture and Design will open at the
Museum of Art in Alumni Memor-
ial 'hall today and continue
through May 31.
Fountain Pens
School Supplies

For DeGasperi
(Continued from Page 1)
ca and held for years in British
concentration camps."
But economic rehabilitation and
physical reconstruction have pro-
gressed rapidly, he said.
Rome is witnessing what Swin-
ton feels may be a Renaissance of
the Arts. Rome is probably roughly
equal to the Paris of the Twenties,"
he said.
Thousands of students have
flocked to the ancient city to
study painting, sculpture and
architecture. There is a good
chance that out of Italy will
come the Fitzgeralds, the Hem-
ingways and the Eliott Pauls who
came out of Paris."
Swinton has gathered news in
67 countries, as Stars and Stripes
correspondent, during World War
II, and since then with the Asso-
ciated Press.
He had followed war around the
world-fought with Italian parti-
sans and witnessed the stringing
up of Mussolini, covered the Indo-
Chinese revolt in 1946, war in Si-
am, the Malayan revolution and
was AP Chief in the Near East

A Friday at Ferry

F ielid

*

*

*

* *

I

.A

-Daily-Frank Barger
BACKSTAGE WITH KINCAID

Kincaid said, "You can find jazz
in good music but you can't find
good music in jazz,
"Of course, you never know who
will be considered a classic com-
poser in a hudnred years. Debussy
was an utlra-modernist. Now his
music is considered as not at all
out of the ordinary and a stand-
by for many programs. It's the
same for Brahms and Bach and
Beethoven."
Although his retirement is in the
far-off future, the flutist may re-
tire to an island in Little Sebago
Lake, Maine, where he can hu-
mor his liking for fresh-water fish-
ing.
Fisherman Kincaid also owns a
Chriscraft speedboat and one can

easily imagine the colorful figureI
of a man who can walk on hisI
knees racing around the Mainel

I -.

lake in his nineties. area and later the Middle East.
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4

PAUL LEPLEY BRINGS HOME THE BACON

CAPTAIN BILL MOGK EXPLAINS GROUND RULES

t(

MINNESOTA PICK-OFF ATTEMPT FAILS

A.

..
:: .

.. s'<..:' . . S. .: .. . -:._. -

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