100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2953

________________________________________ I

SATURAY, AY 2 19_

MOULIN ROUGE:
Daily To Sponsor Film Review Contest

4

* * S *

A chance to join a fraternity of
literary critics that lists such men
as John Mason Brown, Wolcott
Gibbs and Tom Arp is accom-
panied by the opportunity to win
one of fifteen prizes in a Daily-
sponsored film review contest.
Entrants are asked to submit a
statement in fifty words or less
telling why they would like to
review the John Houston produc-
tion of "Moulin Rouge," an adap-
tation of the colorful life of Henri
Toulouse-Lautrec based on Rene
la Mure's novel.
Daily critic Bill Wiegand, Grad.,
will choose the 25 reviewers, 15 of
whose reviews will be selected.
The rules of the contest are as
follows:
1. Entrants must submit a
statement in 50 words or less,
telling why they would like to
review "Moulin Rouge." Let-
ters must be in before midnight,
May 7.
2. Entries may be sent or mail-
ed to The Michigan Daily, Stu-
deit Publications Building.
3. The writers of the best 25
letters will be given a pass to
the opening performance of
"Mo.ulin Rouge" May 8, and
should submit their reviews be-
fore 6 p.m., May 9.
The winning review will appear
in The Daily and its author will
receive a prize of five large Tou-
louse-Lautrecposters. Other priz-
es will be smaller posters, a copy
of the novel from which the film
was adapted, recordings of "The
Song from Moulin Rouge" and
passes to the theater's next at-
traction.
Newman Club
Enters Darby
By RONA FRIEDMAN
While more serious turf fans,
are preparing for the annual
Churchill Downs classic, members
of the University Newman Club
are readying their entries for the
Darby sponsored by University of
Detroit.
The Darby which will be held at
I p.m. today at the Michigan
State Fairgrounds in Detroit is
open to anything with four legs
that isn't a thoroughbred and is
at least three years old.
fo-Blue, a three year old race
horse ridden by Dave Sacha,
Grad., is the Newman Club saddle
race entry.
Doing a take-off on the Brit-
ish Coronation, Newman Club
President Tony Steimle,'53, will
be clothed as Philip. He will
ride Lilibet, a plow horse wear-
ing a red and white chicken wire
crown at a plodding walk be-
fore the grandstand in a bur-.
lesque event.
Forty-four other nags including
mules, plow and milk horses, have
been entered by eight Michigan
colleges to vie for the trophy and
ribbon awards.
The one dollar gate fee will be
added to a fund which University
of Detroit students are raising
through their spring carnivals .to
build a student union.
Ritter Speaks
On Lutherans
Modern German Lutherans, in-
stead of retreating into their own
world of faith, are attempting to
do something about world condi-
tions, according to Prof. Gerhard
Ritter, noted German historian.
Speaking at a history lecture
yesterday, the -professor, who is
on the history faculty of the Uni-
versity of Frieburg, dealt with the
historical background of Luther-

anism and the Reformation..
He said there was a tendency to
group the Renaissance and Refor-
mation together, but he described
the latter as emphasizing man's
basic evil nature and complete de-
pendence on faith forsalvation.
The Renaissance, in contrast,, put
the emphasis on man's own rea-
son.
Prof. Copi Given
Fund Fellowship
Prof. Irving M. Copi of the phil-
osophy department was granted a
one year fellowship for next year
by the Fund for the Advancement
f Education.
The grant, one of 252, is given
by the Fund to enable the recip-
ients to receive further knowledge
in their respective fields.
FAMOUS DROSTE and
LINDT CHOCOLATE
plus
BEST FOOD ON CAMPUS
at
Lumbard's University Drug

Local Police
To Auction
Bikes TodayII
"Sold to the man in the blue
jacket!"
This battle cry of veteran auc-
tioneer Walter Schmid will be
echoed 66 times at 10 a.m. today
when the police department holds
a bicycle auction in the parking
lot next to City Hall.
For the past few weeks, a
complete description of all bikes
to be sold has been posted on
the police department door. The
bikes, which were not claimed
by their rightful owners will be
on the auction block to be sold
to the highest bidders.
Among the bikes are several
English models, along with as-
sorted American makes and sev-
eral two-wheelers of "unknown"
ancestry.
The police are authorized to
sell the bikes at public auction by
an old city ordinance. Under this
law, all abandoned bicycles picked
up by the police and not claimed
by owners within 30 days can be
sold. The money collected is plac-
ed in the city's general fund.

SL Movie
John Duvivier's first Ameri-
can film, "Tales of Manhattan,"
will be shown by the SL Cine-
ma Guild at 7 and 9 p.m. today
and tomorrow and at 8 p.m.
Sunday in Architecture Audi-
torium.
"Tales of Manhattan" is an
omnibus of five Gotham tales
which portray and compare life
in the different socio-economic
classes. An evening coat which
passes from the hands of the
wealthy and ultimately winds
up in the possession of a com-
munity of destitute farmers
provides the focal point for
each of the tales.
A host of top-notch movie
celebrities appear in the film,
including Rita Hayworth,
Charles Boyer, Ethel Waters,
Charles Laughton, Edward G.
Robinson, George Sanders.
School Students
To Give Program
A busload of 30 Granite City,
Ill., high school seniors arrived
here yesterday to present arpro-
gram dramatizing the varied ac-
tivities of high school life before
an audience of Ann Arbor High
School students.

Applications for Fulbright schol-
arships for graduate study abroad
for the 1954-55 year are now avail-
able.
Candidates for the awards,
which may be picked up in Room
1020, Rackham Building, must
have a college degree or its equiv-
alent by 1954, be United States cit-
izens in good health and have a
knowledge of the language of the
Beardsley To Give
TV Talkon Magic
Prof. Richard K. Beardsley of
the anthropology department will
discuss magic and the spirit world
on the University Television Hour
at 1 p.m. Sunday.
Prof. Beardsley will trace the de-
velopment of the concepts of gods
from simple spirits.

country sufficient to

their proposed study.
Awards are =made in the cur-
rencies of the participating
countries abroad, and cover
transportation (tourist class),
tuition, books and maintenance
for one academic year.
If a language refresher or ori-
entation course'abroad is required,
those expenses also will be cover-
ed by the award.
The living allowance is sufficient
to meet "normal living expenses of
a single person for one academic
year." The allowance ranges from
$500 to $1200 depending upon the
cost of living in the country chosen
for study.
The terms of the Fulbright Act
require enrollment in or affilia-
tion with an educational institu-
tion abroad. No limitations are

_ __

Fulbright Applications Now Available

carry on

placed on the applicant's choice
of project or field of study, how-
ever.
An applicant may apply for only
one country and will be notified
of the decision of the scholarship
board on his application approxi-
mately six months after the close
of the competition.
Bishop To Head
Law Publication
Prof. William W. Bishop of the
Law School will take over as edi-
tor-in-chief of the American
Journal of International Law next
fall, it was announced yesterday.
He was elected to the publica-
tion's top editorial post at the
47th annual meeting of the' Amer-
ican Society of International Law
last week in Washington, D.C.

4

Ii

-

Open inq

under

flew. Mlanagement

'l

4

Just in time for MOTHER'S DAY!

'CAN-CAN' DANCERS IN MOULIN ROUGE

U

Festival of Song
To Be Held in Hill
Over 3,000 elementary school
students from Washtenaw and
Monroe counties will participate
in the Festival of Song to be held'
Tuesday in Hill Auditorium.
The WUOM sponsored Festival
will feature pupils from grades
one through eight in songs, sing-
ing games, pantomines, and rhy-
thm bands.
The Festival, which is one of 11
being held in the state this month,
will climax a year of instruction
in music given via radio programs
broadcast by WUOM and sent to
21 stations over the state.

Dennison Receives
Honor in Science
Prof. David M. Dennison of the
physics department was elected to
membership in the National Aca-
demy of Science which is regarded
as the highest honor which can
be bestowed on an American sci-
entist.
Prof. Dennison was honored for
his outstanding original contribu-
tions in the field of physics. His
method of determining molecular
structure from observational data
on the infra-red spectra of mole-
cules has brought national and in-
ternational fame to both him and
the University laboratories.

WE HAVE IMMEDIATE

OPENINGS

-

We are having a get acquainted sale on costume jewelry.
20% to 50% OFF
Come in and select a set of fine hand set jewelry.
A lasting gift for Mother.
- FREE -
Bottle of Famous "Dip Wipe" Jewelry Cleaner compliments of
mc flat fleweter.i
JEWELRY REPAIRING - DIAMOND SETTING
347 Maynard off William
"When your timepiece goes. bad - Bring it to McNab"

1

I

FOR QUALIFIED YOUNG WOMEN
And who wouldn't be interested in
positions that offer so much.
Where else would you find:
High starting wages.'
Excellent chance for promotion,
clean, pleasant surroundings.
We welcome the opportunity to show
you what we mean. Stop in and let us
show you around.
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE CO.
323 E. Washington
Employment office hours:
Monday 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Tuesday through Friday 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 1 :00 P.M.

I

I

Il

r'
x

EVERGREENS
at wholesale.
Home grown by U. of 31. employee.
Prices in classified ad. Tuesday, Thursday, & Saturday'.
MICHAEL LEE of Chem. Stores. Tel. 8574

I

i

.:

r

11

...

" first chair " philadelphia

symphony orchestra * eugene ormandy

first chair

'C
a
0
d
I,

is a record that features the principal instrumentalists of the Philadelphia Sym-
phony Orchestra in extended solos. It offers the concert goer the rare opportunity
to hear and enjoy the artists of the respective sections of an orchestra.
firs it chair
includes eight soloists in varied, interesting selections. They are: Purcell's Trum-
pet Voluntary in D Major, Sanuel Krauss soloist; Chabrier's Larghetto for Horn
and Orchestra, Mason Jones soloist; Phillips' Concert Piece for Bassoon and String
Orchestra, Shoenbach soloist; Griffes' Poem for Flute and Orchestra, William'

n
I.
-
A
'3
0
'<
-a
'A
A..
-S
to
-U
a

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene' A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Discussion Class, Pine Room,
"Understanding the Christian Faith."
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "Making Your Religion
Count" Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and' Program, Miss Doris
Reed, Protestant Counselor to International
Students will speak on "One Out of Seventeen."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: "Forecasts of Redemption."
6:15 P M : Grace Bible Guild supper.
7:30 P.M.: "Turning The Other Cheek."
Monday, 7:30: Bible Class.
Wednesday 7:30: Prayer Meeting.
A Friendly Church where the Word is preached.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister J
William S. Baker, University Pastor
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Sunday Morning Services: 9:15 and 11:15. Henry
Kuizenga preaching, "The People of the Way."
Sunday Morning 10:30: Student Bible Seminar.
'Sunday Evening 6:30: Westminster Guild meeting.
Dr. Douglas Williams of Dunbar Center will
speak on "Human Rights."
Social hour following.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
North Division at Catherine
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary.
9:50 A.M.: Student Breakfast, Canterbury House.
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00A.M.: Church School.
6:45 P.M.: Bible Study. University Students,
Canterbury House.
During the Week
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayers.
During the Week-
Wednesday and Thursday 7:00 A.M.:
Holy Communion.
Friday Holy Communion 12:10 only.
Friday 7:30 P.M.: Series of Five, Bishop Hubbard
speaker at Canterbury House.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Sts.
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Without Benefit of Drums."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House 438 Maynard
H. L. Pickerill, Director
7:00 P.M.: Dr. George Mendenhall: "The Salt
and the Savor" at the Congregational Church.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. AUDITORIUM
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth"
WXYZ-ABC Network
Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Mrs. Ruth Mars, Assistant Student Counselor
9:45 A.M.: Student Bible class studies "Psalms".
11:00 A.M.: Church worship with John W. Thomas,
guest speaker.
7:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild hears Mr.
Thomas. He is the associate director of the
Ministers and Missionaries Board of New York.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "Life's Refreshing Pauses."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
4 Sunday at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Basement of Chapel.

f

\f

a
16
0
mE
hm
0
CL
0
a.
s
0

,1

Kincaid soloist;

Weber's Concertino for Clarinet and Orchestra, Anthony

Giigliotti soloist; Beethoven s Romance No. 2 in F Major for Violin and Orches-
ra, Opus 50, Jacob Krachmalnick soloist; Weber's Adagio and Rondo for Cello
and Orchestra, arranged by Piatigorsky, Lorne Monroe soloist; and Handel's
Concerti No. 3 in G Minor for Oboe and Strings, Marcel Tabuleau soloist.
first c ha
features all the artistry and brilliance of the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra
and its conductor, Eugene Ormandy. May Festival audiences and all music lovers
will be thrilled by the musical splendor of this orchestral work when they hear
FIRST CHAIR at the Music Center. Be among thevn!

4

c
(th

ac
w
do

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Church School and Adult
Group. Prop Leroy Waterman on: "The High-
er Criticism and the new Bible."
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship: Rev. Grey Aus-
tin of Lane Hall staff: "The Object of Objec-
tivity."
Uinitarinn Stuideant Groun notina r nicnic at

all on

one Columbia Long-Playing

record

Q
a

- r

lll ' I l a. lll

I

11 1

11

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan