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May 01, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i I

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 1, 1953

'OFFICIAL WORRIER':
Berman Ends Arts Theater Career,

Seek Blood
Donations

rv , -r-%, As
la 9

Da,

By MARK READER
The Arts Theater is about to
lose its "official worrier." Hy Ber-
man, business manager of the
group, will soon receive his law
degree from the University and
then reluctantly depart for the
.armed service.
One of the last original mem-
bers of Ann Arbor's only profes-
sional acting company, the soft-
spoken, Ohio-born Berman is per-
haps the only person in the group
who has attempted to "avoid with
avengence" dramatic roles of
every sort.
AND HE HAS generally succeed-
ed in this aim.
Most familiar to Arts Theater-
goers for his nightly stints be-
fore the foot-lights where his
dramatic speeches #re limited to
announcements of forthcoming
productions, Berman enjoys re-
miniscing about his short-lived
acting career.
He recalls that his first acting
opportunity came in "The Knight
of the Burning Pestle" when he
filled in for a substitute's substi-
tute.
"Instead of acting," he says, "I
found myself thoroughly enjoying
the show as an outsider. As a re-
sult the part never did come across
to the audience."
* * *
FROM THAT time on, Berman
turned his attentions exclusively
to the business end of the theater.
His undefined job has included
everything from piloting the
theater through legal snarls in
state and national law so as to
incorporate the group to sweep-
ing the front stairs of the thea-
ter.
The latter, he maintains, has
never come off as well as it should.
Berman, a member of Tau Ep-
Bisho To Talk
On Parenthood
The Rt. Rev. Richard S. Emrich,
Episcopal bishop of the Diocese of
Michigan, will deliver a lecture en-
titled "Birth Control, Sin? Chris-
tian?" at 7 p.m. today at the Can-
terbury House.
Bishop Emrich, who has held his
present position for seven years,
was professor of theology at the
Episcopal Theological Seminary in
Cambridge, Mass. He was the
youngest bishop in the Episcopal
Church at the time of his election.
At present Bishop Emrich is also
President of the Detroit Council
of Churches.
The theologian will discuss the
moral implications of planned
parenthood.
The lecture is open to the pub-
lic and a discussion will follow.

0

* * * *

For WSSF
Contributions to the World Stu-
dent Service Fund may be given
in the form of blood donations
this semester.
Instead of offering loose change
to some eager solicitor, contribu-
tors may donate a pint of blood
to the University Hospital and
credit the $15 to WSSF. In this
way, the student will be able to
contribute considerably more than
he could normally afford.
This year, funds collected by
the international student organ-
ization will be sent to students
in Southeastern Asia and South
Korea who are critically in need
of the basic physical equipment
for continuing their education.
According to WSSF committee
member Wyn Price, "money is al-
located to foreign schools in order
to stimulate self-help, and enable
the students to be more self-suf-
ficient." Price cited an example in
which student recipients of the
aid used the money to buy a mim-
eograph machine, and then pro-
ceeded to type-out and mimeo-
graph entire books.
Anyone interested in serving on
the WSSF committee in the fall
may apply at Lane Hall.
Carillonneur
To Play Bells

Drcve
. T -d y
io aI

}

To

Co a~ence

}

* *

The 33rd annual Tag Day will be staged from 8 to 5 p.m. today
with students, faculty members and townspeople manning buckets
for the fund-raising drive.
Proceeds will go to the University Fresh Air Camp to help send
under-privileged boys from all over Michigan to the camp.
A goal of $4,000 has been set by the committee to help provide a
summer vacation for the boys, who range in age from 7 to 14 years.

THIRTY-FIVE STATIONS
downtown to distribute tags and
* *

EVEN WORK IS FUN

will be posted across campus and
collect the donations to help defray
<fthe camp's operational costs.
Faculty members and admin-
istrators who will help collect
funds include Dean of Women
Deborah Bacon, Prof. George
Peek of the political science de-
partment, Assistant Dean of the
engineering'college Walter Em-
mons, Prof. Roger Heyns of the
psychology department, Prof.
Russell C. Hussey of the geology
department and Prof. Preston
Slosson of the history depart-
ment.
The main purpose of the camp
is to cooperate with social agencies
in the state to provide year-round
rehabilitation for boys with vari-
ous behavior problems.
Children from foster homes,
broken homes or placement insti-
tutions spend about four weeks
at the camp. Their activities dur-
ing the summer include swim-
ming, games, overnight hikes,
crafts, movies and boating.
Under the direction of Prof.
William C. Morse of the education
school, the camp is staffed by
teachers, seniors and graduates
students. Operating as a part of
the University summer session,
students spend a summer gaining
experience in social work, guid-
ance and group dynamics.
The drive will continue from 8
a.m. to noon tomorrow.

r

,4

HY BERMAN
... Man behind the scenes

4

* * * 's

in the midst of a busy schedule at

silon Rho, professional law frater-
nity, claims that his experience in
the theater has helped him im-
measurably in his legal studies.
* * *
A CAMPBELL finalist and Sen-
ior Judge, he recounts the time
when ,he was pleading a highly
technical breach of contract case
in Law School. Several members
of the theater's cast had come to
hear his plea and when he fin-
ished, one of the group whimsi-
cally remarked to him, "That was
the dullest script I've ever heard."
During a normal day at the
theater, Berman sorts mail, an-
swers telephone calls, sits in on
rehearsals, schedules perform-
ances, takes care of publicity and
in general is asked to advise ev-
eryone on all facets of the thea-
ter including tax reports.
During his undergraduate days,
he was a rabid sports enthusiast
and still can quote the batting
averages of the leading figures in
baseball.
Tennis, handball and 150 pound
football highlighted his sport ca-
reer before he turned to the thea-

the theater and his law studies.
Wendell Westcott, carillonneur
BERMAN originally became in- of Michigan State College, will be
terested in the theater quite by ac- heard at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow when
cident. When an undergraduate, he plays the Burton Tower caril-
his roommate asked him to help lon.
out in the Inter-Arts Union as a His program includes selections'
production manager. While work- from Handel's "Water Music,"
ing these he met several peole who songs of Stephen Foster, Rottiers'
were considering opening a full- "Praeludium," Debussy's "La Fille

I

time Arts Theater.
When the theater was finally
formed, Berman was asked to
handle the business end of it on
a part-time basis. He has been
with the organization ever since.j
Berman terms acting as a "rough
racket" with little security and
recognition.
"Every secretary I have everj
had," he notes, "has always been
stage struck. I usually advise them
against going into the theater
professionally.
"Yet, if they have the love of
art and are willing to struggle
for it, no one can advise them
against it," he concludes.
As for Berman, he prefers a law
career to one in the unpredictable

aux Cheveux de Lin" and "Dan
Sacree," Westcott's "Berceus
and Rachmaninoff's "Prelude
C-sharp minor."
Theate' To Give

nse
se"
in

Extra Production
The Arts Theater will present
Christopher Fry's "A Sleep of Pris-
oners" May 7 to 9 at St. Andrew's
Church as an extra production in
its current drama season.
John Devoe, Ken Rosen. Gerald j
Richards and Jim Jones will com-
pose the cast.
Ticket prices are $1.80, $1.50 and
$1.20 and may be obtained at the
theater at 2092 E. Washington.

PHOTO
FEATU RE
Story by
KATHY ZEISLER
Pictures by
DON CAMPBELL
and
MALCOLM SHATZ

4

r

DEAN WALTER REA (LEFT), PROF. GEORGE PEEK AND DEAN DEBORAH BACON WILL
HELP COLLECT FUNDS

i

+nv LT- r+ill w nrr.n ... +.. A-A v+:...

1''

ter. He sil manages to fnda time f thea
for an occasional handball game
If

ter.

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