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April 30, 1953 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-30

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PAGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY APRIL 30, 1953

PAGE SIX ThURSDAY APRIL 30, 1953

TURTLE-TWITCHING THORPE:
EndsReign Amid Pile of Wastepaper
4' * * * *

By GAYLE GREENE
In room 3C of the Union, over-
looking Alumni Memorial Hall and
the screeching drills of workmen
on State St., Pete Thorpe swept a
pile of scrap paper off a desk into
a nearby wastebasket.
"I can't stand stuff scattered
around," the ex-Interfraternity
Council president explained, scoop-
ing some old newspapers off the
floor.
In his position of "has been,"
Thorpe haunts the office nearly
all day, either to act as unofficial
charwoman or in the task of
"breaking in new IFC officers."
* * *
ONE OF HIS friends tried to ex-
plain Thorpe's power in the IFC.
"I don't know if I should call it an
enlightened despotism," he said.
"But Pete ran the IFC with an
iron hand. He organized every-
thing down to the most minute
detail so when a vote came up
the men seemed to think 'Well,
Pete worked on this and so it
must be allright.' As far as I
know he never lost a vote."
No facet of any job is left un-
categorized by Thorpe. "About the
Fresh Air Camp project," he said,
lugging a black leather volume to
a large conference table. "Six
weeks of paper work preceded the
actual job-painting and clean-up
by fraternity and sorority pledges
as part of Greek 'Help Week.' "
RUFFLING through the pages,
Thorpe pointed out form letters,
announcements, releases for pledge
trainers, tabulation sheets, direc-
tions for pledges, requisitions for
borrowed materials and master
lists of those who promised and
those who never showed up.
"The only thing we can't plan
is the weather," he said.
"It was the girl I am engaged
to who first suggested that
pledges clean and paint up the
camp," Thorpe beamed. (Polly
Colliver, '53Ed. is an avowed in-
dependent according to one of
her Martha Cook dormmates).
It is difficult to find Thorpe
talking about anything but the
IFC. Hopping about the office for
tabulation sheets, pamphlets and
calendars to punctuate his conver-
sation, he will speak for hours on
his hopes and plans for IFC, the
rushing counselor system and the'
Big Ten Counseling Service.
("A service which hopes to solve
the selective membership problem
from within the fraternity sys-
tem.")
HE PAUSED long enough, how-
ever, to recommend a Student Ac-
tivities Center as a "solution to
constant conflict and misunder-
standing between organizations,
the administration and the stu-
dents."
Such a center would eliminate
the lack of communication he
feels' is responsible for 50 per

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
PETE THORPE
.. .tropical fish and the 'IFC

Applications
For Foreign
StudiesOpen
Applications for graduate study
abroad under the Fulbright Act
for 1954-55 will be available to-
morrow in Rm. 1020 of the Rack-
ham Bldg.
AWARDS ARE granted for study
in Australia, Austria, Belgium and
Luxembourg, Burma, Denmark,
Egypt, France, Greece, India, Iran,
Iraq, Italy, Japan, Netherlands,
New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan,
Philippines, Thailand, Turkey, Un-
ion of South Africa and the Unit-
ed Kingdom.
Awards cover transportation
(tourist class), tuition, books and
maintenance for one academic
year.
The living allowance is designed
to meet normal living expenses of
a single person for one academic
year. The allowance ranges from
$500 to $1200 and is determined by
the cost of living in the country
chosen for study.
Engineer Open
House Slated
"Automobiles Too Old or Too
New to Buy" will be the highlight
exhibit of the bi-annual Engineer-
ing School Open House scheduled
for tomorrow and Saturday. i
Approximately 16 automobiles,1
many the property of Ann Arbor
residents, will be shown.
In addition to this display all
departments of the school will be'
open to the public for inspection,
and many of them have planned
exhibits designed to illustrate mo-
dern scientific innovations.
Although the Open House is not
a part of the all-campus Univer-
sity Day, invitations have been ex-
tended to all the state's high
school students to attend.
ST UDE NT
SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
REPAIRED
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago
Tape and Wire Recorders
MORRILL'S
314 S. State Ph. 7177

WQ Banquet
West Quadrangle Quadrants
will hold their annual banquet
at 5:45 today in the Quad.
Twelve pins will be present-
ed to new members and Dean
of Men Walter B. Rea and Leo-
nard A. Schaadt, business man-
ager of the residence halls, will
receive honorary pins.
Guests will include Dean of
Students Erich A. Walter, and
Karl D. Streiff, assistant to the
dean of students.
Far Eastern
Expert Sees
Overpopulationl
"If the present rate of popula-
tion increase continues in Asia
without any effectual controls
there will be standing room only
within a century," Irene Taeuber,
expert of Far Eastern population
problems, said last night.
Delivering an address on Public
Health and Population Prospects
in Asia., Miss Taeuber said that
any estimation of population
trends is not entirely predictable.
Due to scientific and technological
changes populations are subject to
the social policies of change
Miss Taeuber especially pointed
to Japan's effort to solve its popu-
lation problem over the years. She
noted that although rapid popu-
lation increase lie ahead for at
least a century, scientific advances
which have led in part to low fer-
tility and low mortality rates are
the best answer to Japan's popu-
lation problem.

C artoonistsA spot where neolithic man
once ground his tools has become!
the camping ground of a few men
People are trying to stifle liber- and women of the atomic age.
ty by rationing it out in little Until recently the area around
pieces and keeping the big por- IKillarney, Ontario, appeared to
tion for themselves, Walt Kelly, contain only abandoned beaches.
creator of Pogo, said yesterday at These sites, however, have become
a lecture sponsored by the jour- objects of great interest to nine
nalism department. University graduates and upper-{
Kelly, who was named cartoon-
ist of the year by the National!
Cartoonist's Association, said thaty y N iveC l
cartoonists should remind Con- .
gress that "the basic American ("'1.'
of being a damned fool is ! Changing
not Congress' alone."
iuT1ra- ng4-f-1q- nn},^Utz;+,Wi LI PrsofSuhAercnc

Kelly Talks
On Liberty,

Illstrtin hi letur wih; Parts of South American cul-
cartoons, Kelly explained his co- ture are being completely revolu-7
mic strip as putting many human tionized by recent Protestant mis-1
characteristics on paper. Calling sions in rural communities, Prof.1
life a swamp, with "some highIEmilie Willems, of Vanderbilt Uni-
spots, the rest mushy with some versity, explained in a lecture yes-
s t r a n g e characters running terday.
through," he gave short descrip- rd
tions of the animals in his car- Prof. Willen s said that small
toos.Protestant groups have sprung up;l
oons.in many parts of South America1
and have introduced radically dif-
Funeral Rites Set ferent ideas into the native reli-s
Funeral services will be held at gious, social and educational
11 a.m. today at the Muehlig Fun- structures
eral Chapel for Nan Geddes Riggs, He attributed Protestant suc-
former housemother for several cess to the weakness of the offi-
sororities and dormitories.; cial Roman Catholic Churph, 1
Burial will be at the Evergreenwhich he said, "has grown into as
Bery win Detith E g loose mixture of folk religion and1
Cemtry in Detroit. mgc"
magic." :
ON THE CAMPUS ..
Nearly EVERYONE --
trades at
LUMIARS
UNIVERSITY DRUG r

classmen who spend their summer
camping in the vicinity.
UNDER THE guidance of Prof.
Emerson Greenman of the anthro-
pology department, the students
excavate, survey, and explore the
vast store of archeological evi-
dences found in the area.
Stone implements of the Neo-
lithic Age and skeletal material
accompanied by flint and cop-
per tools are among the items
which they have excavated and
turned over in part to Canadian
museums.
L o c a t e d near an isolated
French-Canadian fishing village,
the camp was discovered in 1939
by Prof. Greenman.
Although Camp Killarney is the
smallest University camp, it has
contributed its share to the com-
munity. According to Prof. Green-
man, one of the beach sites ap-
pears to be historically related to
three other Norwegian sites.
With two permanent buildings
and an assortment of sleeping
tents, the camp is a far cry from
the common conception of a com-
fortably rustic summer camp, but
the small group of students who
attend gain valuable experience
through the combination of re-
search and teaching offered them.

'U' Students To Organize
Camp at Neolithic Site

* * *
cent of such misunderstanding;
providing physical proximity for
the groups without sacrificing
structural independence.
Despite a seeming emphasis on
activities and their relation to the
community, Thorpe insists medi-
cine is the most important thing
in his life. "Medical school is a
time for technical training" but
the undergrad days offer an op-
portunity to understand people
and their personalities," he ex-
plained.
* * *
THE 22-YEAR-OLD Niles, Mich-
igan pre-medic pledged Kappa
Sigma his freshman year and went
right into IFC activities with such
dedication that he was rarely seen
around the fraternity house.
"Twitching Turtle Thorpe" (as
his Michiguamua tribes broth-
ers dubbed him) would have one
believe he was born full grown
and a member of IFC. When
asked about his youth he said:
"Youth? . . . as I was saying,
the IFC's largest area for ex-
pansion is in the field of a bet-
ter informed and more active
alumni."
As for his campus life outside
the IFC sphere-"I'm not a cam-
pus character or a member of Phi
Beta Kappa," Thorpe mused. "Let's
see, what am I? The hell of it is
that I'm so darned serious minded.
If anyone comes into the office
and laughs, I wince."
The future Mrs. Thorpe dis-
missed the rumors that Thorpe
had no youth by: "He was a beau-
tiful baby. I saw all his baby pic-

J

S * *

tures last time I visited their farm
in Niles."
Thorpe may appear the epitome
of seriousness and efficiency to his
colleagues but to Miss Colliver,
"he's not a bit serious."
"He may be noted for his punc-
tuality at meetings," she com-
plained, "but he's never on time1
for a date."!
Miss Colliver managed to shedl
some light on Thorpe's evasive per-
sonal life. "He likes Stan Kenton,
used to keep six tanks of tropical
fish at the fraternity house and
wears terrible ties, except when

If

_ I I!!1
I-

l/Ledi~ng Jitta hio i'
avdn noa{Jmnt

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he borrows
said.

his roommate's," she

.j ,
i

Police To Auction
Off 50 Bicycles
More than 50 unclaimed bicy-
cles will be put on the auction
block by city police at 10 p.m.
Saturday in the parking lot next
to city hall.
Serial numbers and descriptions
of bikes are posted on the door of
the city hall for those wishing to
claim a lost bicycle.

Alljf7
Nei i§7

Printed, Embossed,
or Engraved.
Reasonably priced.

t
,
,
'd
iiil

has excellent opportunities
for COLLEGE GRADUATES
in AERONAUTICAL -MECHANICAL
ELECTRONIC -STRUCTURAL - PRODUCTION
ENGINEERING
A secure future, exceptional opportunities for
advancement, and an excellent starting salary await you at
FAIRCHILD, if you are one of the men we are looking for.
We have openings right now for qualified engineers and
designers in all phases of aircraft engineering; we need
top-notch men to help us in our long-range military
program: turning out the famous C-119 Flying Boxcars
and other projects for the U. S. Air Force.
FAIRCHILD provides paid vacations and liberal health and
life insurance coverage. We work a 5-day, 40-hour week
as a base. Premium is paid when longer work week is
scheduled.
ENGINE AND AIRPLANE CORPORATION
IRCH ILD Aaaasoe
HAGERSTOWN. MARYLAND

WEDDING ACCESSORIES --
Napkins, Matches, and Thank-You Notes.
RAMSAY PRINTERS
119 East Liberty (Across from the P-Bell)

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

J

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v(o0
May 10th is Mother's Day... o
Remember Her with a Mother's Pin of your c
fraternity or sorority, or with a crested gift
appropriate for her day. Balf our's has a complete
line of gift items, and welcome your inspection.
HOME OF THE OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING"
L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY
1321 South University - Ann Arbor, Michigan
- SAVE AT SAM'S STORE -
ARMY-NAVY TYPE
WASHABLE PANTS

WE HAVE IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
FOR QUALIFIED YOUNG WOMEN
And who wouldn't be interested in
positions that offer so much.
Where else would you find:
High starting wages.
Excellent chance for promotion,
clean, pleasant surroundings.
We welcome the opportunity to show
you what we mean. Stop in and let us
show you around.
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE CO.
323 E. Washington
Employment office hours:
Monday 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Tuesday through Friday 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M.

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aid up
* SANFORIZED
* BUTTON AND
ZIPPER

Short Stories by

I

LEONARD GREENBAUM
MAYBELLE HSU EH
RICHARD LAING
HENRY VAN DYKE,
MARK GOODWILL

So, for the thing you want most in a cigarette ...
for better taste -for the cleaner, fresher, smoother
taste of Lucky Strike ...
Be Happy-GO LWKYI

a t he camfpS ot'
~4 elh !bar p r de and
ttsflurkewtra qual'k9
Univerty f

Army-Navy Style
OXFORDS

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