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April 29, 1953 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-29

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. MMMOMM

PAGE sm

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL. 29,.2953

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 1953

CASE CLUB FINALS:
Lawyers Vie in Campbell Competition

$ * *

* *

Climaxing two years of Case
Club competition, two pairs of
Law School juniors will match
wits today in the final round ar-
guments of this year's Henry M.
Campbell competition.
Winners of the verbal battle,
scheduled for 2:15 p.m. in Rm.
100 Hutchins Hall,, will receive
$100 each. The runners-up will
each be awarded $50.
Judges for the oral arguments,
which will be open to the public
will be Justice George E. Bush-
nell of the Michigan Supreme
Court, Justice William L. Dart of
the Ohio Supreme Court, Dean E.
Blythe Stason of the law school
and Harrison Tweed, New York
attorney.
* * S
TWEED, WHO is president of.
the American Law Institute and
the American Legal Aid Society
and a past president of the New
York Bar Association, will speak
at a banquet at 6:30 p.m. today
in the League. The judges' deci-
sion will be announced at the ban-
quet.
David W. Belin, '54L and Hugh
G. Harness, '54L, will face Donn
B. Miller, '54L and Theodore J.
St. Antoine, '54L in the mock
trial finals. They will be argu-
ing a case involving questions of
alleged anti-trust law violations.
In the imaginary case, a tele-
vision station has sued a hotel
and a theater to stop them from
showing and charging admission
to football game telecasts to which
the TV station has exclusive rights.
The judges' decision will be
based on (1) the quality of the
written briefs submitted before
the trial and (2) the quality of the
oral arguments. The merits of
the particular case will not be con-
sidered.

Bike Sale
More than 50 unclaimed bi-
cycles which Ann Arbor po-
lice have found abandoned will
go on sale at public auction at
10 a.m. Saturday in the park-
ing lot next to city hall.
Serial numbers and descrip-
tions of the bicycles are now
posted in the city hall for any-
one wishing to claim a missing
bicycle before the sale.
'Re-reading Lear'
To Be Presented
"On Re-Reading King Lear," a
lecture by W. Powell Jones, Dean
of Adelbert College of Western
Reserve University, will be pre-
sented at 4:15 p.m. today in Audi-
torium C, Angell Hall.
The lecture is sponsored by the
English Department.

s

PUSH BUTTON LEARNING?
Tennessee Uses Class Reaction Meter

By FREDDI LOEWENBERG
The push button has invaded
the field of learning.
An electronic device which en-
ables the student to register an
immediate protest if he fails to
grasp what his professor is saying
is now being used experimentally
at the University of Tennessee.
Called the "student reaction
meter," the push button aid to
learning consists of buttons on
each student's desk attached to a
meter facing the lecturer.
When a button is pushed, it sets
the meter needle quivering.
* * *
THE METER can be calibrated
according to the number of stu-
dents in the class and registers the
number who aren't understanding
the problem.

If the number is large, the
professor can repeat and thus
clarify his material.
Termed simple and practical for
almost any classroom, the meter is
being used in elementary engineer-
ing courses.
* * *
REACTION TO- the meter here
was almost evenly divided between
those who feel it is what the lec-
ture system needssand those who
think it would be confusing and
impractical for classroom use.
Prof. George Peek of the po-
litical science department term-
ed it necessary because, "pro-
fessors are fairly sensitive and
can usually judge whether their
point is getting across." How-
ever, he added that it might
work in a small group.

One of those who thought the
idea good, Prof. Wilbert Mc-
Keachie of the psychology depart-'
ment pointed out that it might
help students to learn more rapid-
ly.
Some professors, he explained,
need to have the aid of some sort
of "shocking" apparatus to rea-
lize that their students aren't
getting the point of the lecture.
Prof. Preston Slosson, of the his-
tory department, while thinking
the gadget a ,good idea, had an-
other suggestion.
He recommended a ticker tape
be attached to the meter so that
the student could ask particular
questions on the lecture instead of
just registering his lack of under-
standing.

SLAgenda
The following topics will
make up the agenda for Stu-
dent Legislature's meeting at
7.30 p.m. today in Strauss
Dining Rm., East Quadrangle:
Motion on driving ban
Appointments to .committee
chairmanships
Motion on off-campus hous-
ing
Committee reports
All interested students and
faculty members are invited by
SL to attend the meeting.
Willems Talk
Prof. Emilio Willems, of Van-
derbilt University's anthropology
department, and visiting profes-
sor at the University this year,
will speak on "Protestantism as a
Factor of Cultural Change in
Brazil" at 4:10 p.m. today in the
West Conference Room of Rack-
ham Bldg.

1

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standing.

m

ham Bldg

(

-Daily-Don Campbell
MOCK TRIAL-Donn Miller rehearses for the Case Club finals
today while his teammate Theodore St. Antoine checks his notes
and their opponents David Belin and Hugh Harness go into a
huddle.
Dr. Taueber To Speak Today

Dr. Irene Taeuber of the Offile
cf Population Research, a project
of Princeton University, will speak
oa "Public Health aad Population
Prospects in Asia" at 8 p.m.

today in Rackham Amphitheater.
The talk is sponsored by the De-
puatment of Conset ration of the
Schr.ol of Natural Resources, and
will be open to the public.

&

n

Scholarship
Aids Granted
For 1953-54
Eleven University students and
one faculty member have been
granted aids for study next year.
Nine winners of Fulbright
awards received grants which will
enable them to study abroad dur-
ing the next academic year under
the U.S. Educational Exchange
Program.
The student recipients of these
awards are: George W. Knepper;
Ruth Gowa, '53; Harold M. Her-
man, '53; Hiroaki G. Kakiuchi,
Grad.; George TI. Shea, Grad.;
Aolv B. Yttrehus, Grad.; Robert
F. Emery, Grad.; Arthur S. Wen-
singer, Grad.; and David S. Brown.
Prof. Wayne E. Hazen of the phys-
ics department has also been
awarded a grant.
Winners of two Woodrow Wilson
Fellowships were Angelo Cantera,
'53, and Alvin Green, 53. The fel-
lowships, which are given by the
Association of Graduate Schools,
are awarded to students showing
marked promise for the teaching
profession.
Law Students
Pick Officers
Henry Gleiss, '54L, and Frank
Wheeler, '54L, have been elected
president and vice-president of the
Student Bar association.
Junior and senior class officers
of the law school also have been
announced.
Seniors elected as their class
heads are Leonard Kravets, '54L,
president; Marvin Young, '54L,
vice-president; and Herb Ruben,
'54, secretary-treasurer. Jerry
Donley, '54L and David Tennent,
'54L, are the new Student Bar
commissioners.
In the Junior class, Jack Heinen,
'55L will serve as president; Rob-
ert Mortensen, 155L, as vice-pres-
ident; and Lee Robinson, 155L will
be. secretary-treasurer. Robert
Schuur '55L, and Robert Olsen,
'55L are Junior bar commissioners.
Air Force ROTC
To Hold Inspection
A three-man inspection team
from Air Force ROTC headquart-
ers will conduct the annual rou-
tine inspection of the University
detachment on Monday and Tues-
day.
The inspection will cover teach-
ing facilities, techniques and ad-
ministrative problems, according
to Col. William Todd, chairman of
the Department of Air Science and
Tactics.
At 1 p.m. on Monday, 986 Air
Force ROTC cadets will parade in
review at Ferry Field for the in-
specting officers.

't

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The Lincoln Mercury Division of the Ford
Motor Co. needs men to work in their
Wayne Assembly Plant at 37625 Mich-

igan Ave. (I mile west of Wayne

-20

minutes from Ann Arbor)
2nd shift (4:030 to 71QQ A.M.)
Those students starting work now will be
given preference for summer positions.

.3
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Mothers, too, love our
DALTON
CASHMERES
(and Mother's day is May 10th)
8 WONDERFUL NEW STYLES IN
WONDERFUL COLOR, AND SIZE VARIETY!
ALL NEW
$ 95to $ 2295
Slipovers, Cardigans, novelty neckline treat-
ments, contrast trims. Oh what a joy to
be able to choose from such variety.
PLENTY of WHITES and PASTELS

{,,,
f'

One of the newest

and

most

modern

I

assembly plants in the industry with cafe-
teria, locker, and shower facilities avail-
able to you.
$1.79 per hour and up depending on qualifications.

>'4

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