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April 26, 1953 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-26

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_, SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

, SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 1953 PAGE SEVEN

Annual Tag Day Drivel
To Take Place Friday
Proceeds To Be Donated to Fresh Air Camp;
Campus Groups, Professors To Man Buckets

Women's Editors

DANCE REVENUE
Emergency Fund To Aid Students

G

Tag Day, annual drive to raise
funds for the University Fresh Air
Camp for underprivileged boys,
will be held Friday and Saturday.
Thirty-five posts will be set up
on campus and in the downtown
areas where people may make their
donations and receive a tag. These
posts will be manned by the men's
end women's residences.
PROFESSORS AND local per-
sonalities will be scheduled to man

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WAA SOFTBALL TOURNA-
MENT-This week's schedule of
softgall games is as follows:
Monday at 5:10 p.m.-Stockwell
I vs. Sorosis I*; Cheever I vs. Bar-
bour I*; at 7 p.m.-Chi Omega I
vs. Sigma Delta Tau I*; Vaughn I
vs. Jordan II*; Newberry I vs.
Kappa Alpha Theta II*; Couzens
I vs. Stockwell II*.
Tuesday at 5:10 p.m.-Martha
Cook II vs. Newberry II*; at 7 p.m.
-Alpha Chi Omega III vs. Pal-
mer I*; Prescott II vs. Alpha Xi
Delta II*; Angell I vs. Alpha Omi-
cron Pi I*.
Wednesday at 5:10 p.m.-Kappa
Alpha Theta I vs. Delta Gamma*;,
Alpha Epsilon Phi I vs. Kappa
Kappa Gamma I*; at 7 p.m.-
Stockwell IV vs. Martha Cook I*.
.Thursday at 5:10 p.m.-Alpha
Delta Pi II vs. Kappa Delta I*;
at 7 p.m.-Couzens II vs. Angell
II*; Stockwel III vs. Vaughn II*.
* Teams in charge of equipment.
4 * * *
PHYSICAL EDUCATION -Dr.
L. Campbell, Dr. B. Pease, Miss R.
Harris, Miss F. Gareis, Miss E.
Ludwig and Dr. E. Walters, all
members of the Women's Physi-
cal Education Department will at-
tend the Midwest American Asso-
ciation for Health, Physical Edu-
cation and Recreation Conference
April 29 to May 2 at Madison, Wis-
consin.
* * *
SPORTS EQUIPMENT -With
the weather now more suitable for
picnics students may rent sports
equipment and camping kits at
the Women's Athletic Building for
a small rental fee.
* * *
BALLET AWARD-Mac Emsh-
willer, a member of the Ballet
Club, has been awarded a schol-
arship to attend the Connecticut
College Summer School of the
Dance this summer.

buckets and hand out tags at vari-
ous times from 8 a.m. through
5:30 p.m. Friday.
All proceeds from the benefit
go toward the Fresh Air Camp
and are used to give boys a
chance to spend some time join-
ing in outdoor activities and the
other experiences of camping.
Boys are sent by social insti-
tutions to help rehabilitate boys
from foster homes and broken
homes. Some have records as de-
linquents.
AS A consequence of their back-
grounds, the boys present proble-
matic behavior in a far higher in-
cidence than would be true in the
usual camp.
The Fresh Air Camp has ano-
ther function in addition to the
charitable purposes. The camp is
used to train seniors and grad-
uate students during the sum-
mer session in social work and
related fields.
Experience is gained through a
summer with the boys in case work
and field work among children.
For this students receive credits.
ONE-THIRD of the camp's
yearly operational costs are met by
Tag Day. The rest of the costs are
payed by the University's Summer
Session and by the institutions
sending campers.
Tag Day is entirely under the
direction of campus student or-
ganizations. Students sit in on
the budget committees of the
camp to gain understanding
about its operation, and then
plan Tag Day.
The 33rd annual Tag Day is un-
der the direction of Gail Hyman,
who is Project Chairman of As-
sembly Association. Other campus
organizations working on the pro-
ject are the three quadrangles,
Interfraternity Council, Michigan
Daily, League, Union, Panhellenic
Association and Student Legisla-
ture.
The 1951 drive netted $4,000 for
this fund, and last year's goal,
which was' met with the aid of
outside contributions was also $4,-
000.
The tag day idea originated
many years ago when The Daily
printed special Goodfellow edi-
tions of the paper which faculty
members sold.
Included among the University
personnel who helped with the
project last year were Dean Erich
Walter, Dean Deborah Bacon,
Dean Sarah Healy, and Dean Ivan
Parker.

NEW EDITORS-Marilyn Campbell, '54, of Saginaw was appoint-
ed last night at the meeting of the Board in Control of Student
Publications as the new Women's Editor and Katherine Zeisler,
'54 of Ann Arbor was chosen as Associate. Miss Campbell is a
journalism major and a member of Theta Sigma Phi, journalism
honorary. Miss Zeisler is also majoring in the Department of
Journalism and is a member of Senior Society, Mortarboard and
Theta Sigma Phi.
Dormitories Will Entertain
At Annual Picnic,_Musicale

A badly-needed operation, but
no money to pay for it, a riot at
home which destroys a foreign
student's support-these are two
typical cases which the Emergen-
cy Fund for Foreign Students is
able to help.
The fund, administered by Mr.
Robert Klinger, assistant counselor
to foreign students, exists only by
donations. For the past several
years, revenue has come only from
the International Ball.
* * *
AN EXCEPTION was made in
late 1948, when the situation in
China was particularly grave. At
that time an appeal for funds was
made to the public.
All profits from the annual
ball go into the fund. Most of
this money comes from patrons,
who pay more than $3.00 for
their tickets.
In planning last year's dance,
there were unexpected expenses
and so the fund relied only on the
patrons. This year, according to
the committee, care is being taken
to avoid this difficulty.
The Emergency Fund is used to
make grants to foreign students
who have a genuine need and who
cannot obtain money elsewhere
because they are not able to pro-
mise repayment within a fore-
seeable time.
STUDENTS WHO obtain aid
FOR THE SHARPEST
GREETING CARDS
IN TOWN
Buy
PANDA
I ot

from the fund, usually under $25,
pay back the money if and when
they can. They are not under any
obligation to pay it back at all,
but most of them do, for they re-
alize that their repayment will
help another student.
Last year a grant made in
1945 was put back into the fund.
Sometimes the Center is sur-
prised by the repayment of
loans made as long as ten or
fifteen years ago.
Dislocation because of war, revo-
lution, sudden devaluation of cur-
rency, death of a means of sup-
port, earth quakes and almost any
natural calamity can have their
reverberations on the fund.
A typical case is that of a for-
eign student whose scholarship
had terminated.' She had one se-
mester to go and by employment
could save enough for tuition and
books, but had nothing left for
clothes. While talking with her,
Mr. Klinger discovered this and
consequently the student received
the badly-needed aid.
ANOTHER STUDENT received
emergency aid after political riots
destroyed the family business.

Other students ran into difficulty
when their home-country's cur-
rency was devaluated. They re-
ceive the same amount of money,
but it is not worth as much.
Run on a completely individu-
al basis, grants are made after
a conference between Mr. Klin-
ger and the student involved.
For amounts over $25, a board
meeting is held.
Mr. Klinger stated that it is
very seldom that a foreign stu-
dent comes in and asks for money.
The problem comes to the light
only during a discussion on some
other subject.

RHYTHM SLIPS
$3.95
This luxurious Lingerie is easy to
care for because it is made of gen-
vine Ny-ron. Feels like silk., easy
to launder, will not shrink, cool
comfortable year-round. Shadow-
proof. Dries in minutes with best
results from drip drying.
SIZES 32-3 . .* WHITE.

Last year the fund hit zero
before International Ball. The
$200 profits made from the
dance, and repayments of old
grants amounting to $350, swell-
ed the balance to $550.
The fund now stands at $27,
with grants amounting to $523 be-
ing made during the year.
Larger grants than $25 could be
made if more money was available.
According to Mr. Klinger, the fund
could have used quite a bit more
this year than was available.
This year's International Ball
will be held from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Friday, May 15 in the Union Ball-
room.

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-MI'Mol

Martha Cook.. .
The Martha Cook women will
present their annual Farmer's Pic-
nic, a faculty supper at 5 p.m., to-
day.
The theme of entertainment will
center around a little red school
house.
Decorations will bring guests in-
side a one room country school
with slates and a large black pot-
bellied stove in the corner of the
room.
The coeds and the faculty will
be costumed as either farmers or
little children to carry out the pic-
nic's theme.
Arrangements are being made
by general chairmen, Laura Ack-
erman and Audrey LaRouche, en-
tertainment chairman, Elaine

Gulden, and decorations chairmen,
Mary La Due, Jane Alexy, Virginia
Bender, and Inez Krouse.
S * *
South Quad ...
The last in a series of afternoon
musicales will be presented from
1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday in the
West Lounge of the South Quad-
rangle.
Excerpts from the forthcoming
operettas "Trial by Jury" and
"H.M.S. Pinafore" to be presented
by Gilbert and Sullivan Society
will be given and Jay Foster, grad-
uate student in the music school,
will present several piano selec-
tions.
The musicale is open to the
public, free of charge.

K. JEWELL R. JEWELL
Now is the time to get ready
to wear your bathing suits and
summer sports clothing.
We offer you complete Body
Contour Service. Day or eve-
ning appointments available:
Phone calls accepted on Sun-,
days,
K & R!-J
REALTH STUDIO
324 E. Liberty Phone 2-6421
Next to Colonial Yarn Shop

'
.
.

Z e Van I S ur en - 2
8 Nickels Arcade -- Phone 2-2914

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