100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 24, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1953

PAGE SIX FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1953

'U' Offers New Extension
Course on Retirement Plans

SL GAVEL RELINQUISHEL:
Honors, Ties Accumulated by Willens

By VIRGINIA VOSS

O>

*: :.

A University extension course
entitled "Delightful Things To Do
in Retirement" will be offered be-
ginning at 7:30 p.m. Monday.
Consisting of a series of six
meetings, the course is planned to
demonstrate the types of activi-
ties mature people enjoy. The pro-
gram has been arranged by Wilma
T. Donahue, chairman of the Di-
vision of Gerontology, Institute for
Human Adjustment.
"THE HAPPIEST older people
are those who have a wide variety
of interests and skills," Mrs. Dona-
hue said. "They are the people
who have stored their minds with
a wealth of interesting things to
think about and who have trained
themselves to enjoy participation
in many activities."

Such varied handicrafts and
hobbies as making wire or cer-
amic jewelry, basket weaving,
silver work, photography, rug
hooking, bird watching, gem
cutting, and sculpture will be
discussed by people who have
already retired or who are plan-
ning ahead for retirement ac-
tivities.
One session will be devoted to
a visit to the industrial arts shop
in the University High School.
The final meeting will be a garden
tour and a discussion of garden-
ing as a hobby.
An enrollment fee of five dol-
lars may be paid during the half
hour preceding the opening ses-
sion in Rm. 171 Business Admin-
istration Bldg.

1.

I1

11

IN ANN ARBOR
. . .it's the V F.W. Club for
DANCING
Friday and Saturday Nites
Members-
and Guests
314 E. Liberty St
Ph. 2-3972
C -UD You Must Be 21

11

DON BAILEY
Your Singing Host

__ HALL RENTALS & BANQUETS
Riley's Capitol Market
Open every evening until 1 :00
Sunday until Midnight

aII

ENTERTAINING NEEDS
FOR EVERY PARTY OCCASION

BEER * WINE f CHAMPAIGNE * LIQUOR
MEATS and GROCERIES

123 East Washington

Depending on whether you look
at him from an activities, class-
room or roommate orientation,
Howard Willens, '53, means Stu-
dent Legislature president, 3.85
average or rack upon rack of all-
occasion ties.
Now relegated to the ranks of
"has beens" on the SL front, Wil-
lens, present tense, is a 21-year-
old Oak Park, Ill., senior with a
list of campus honors matched
numerically only by his collection
of four-in-hands.
WILLENS reflects that he "does
not bewail the hours spent" mov-
ing up through the SL committee-
cabinet structure and becoming
Phi Beta Kappa on the side.
Effort he has spent building
around himself a "myth that
others feel as strongly as I do
about student government" is
another matter.
However pessimistically he looks
at his myth, he stands firm on the
ground that thefuture will see no
need for it. "The principle of the
democratic voice of student,opin-
ion has real validity," he feels,
"and is one which will be accept-
ed."
Sincere beliefs that "SL is a
permanent fixture" and thatd"the
motivation of people in student
government is not ulterior" have
'madefor Willens' optimistic out-
look.
* k
THE TWO-and-a-half year SL
career which ended in a several
minute ovation in the midst of
new cabinet elections Wednesday
night began ingloriously enough.
A transfer from California's
Stanford University, Willens as a
sophomore joined Zeta Beta Tau
fraternity. The ZBT's were looking
for a ''bright young man'' to run
for SL and Willens, who at the
Alumni Given
Clean 'Slate'
The University of Michigan
Alumni Club in Hong Kong, has
been granted a non-Communist
stamp of approval by the Hong
Kong police.
The police had previously re-
fused to officially recognize the
alumni club because they felt its
constitution allowed the accep-
tance of "undesireable persons"
into the organization. The persons
were living in neighboring Com-
munist China.
The constitution had stated
that "persons residing in or near
Hong Kong" were eligible to join
the club.
"On the basis of this" said
Jack Yuen, president of the alum-
ni group, "the police thought we
might accept members from the
People's Republic of China."
At the last meeting of the Alum-
ni Club the constitution was
amended so that only residents of
Hong Kong would be acceptable
for membership. This satisfied the
objections of the police.
Benner To Head
Engineering Group
Tom Benner, '55E, and Bill Dia-
mond, '56E, have been elected to
one semester terms as chairman
and secretary of the Engineering
Steering Committee.
The following have been ap-
pointed to one year terms as mem-
bers of the committee: Tawfiq N.
Khoury, '54E, Keith Coates, '56E,
David Davies, '55E, Peter Reed,
'54E, Irv Stewart, '53E, and Fritz
Glover, '55E.

Spiegel To Lecture
Edward Spiegel, Grad., will give
a glimpse of a day on the moon
during the astronomy depart-
ment's visitors' night at 8 p.m.
today in Rm. 2003, Angell Hall.
The lecture will be followed by
a visit to the observatory.

time lived in Strauss House, East
Quad, was contacted.
What the ZBT's overlooked
was the six-man slate of Strauss
House candidates, Willens in-
cluded.
After a campaign handicapped
by split house allegiance, the po-
litical science major sat it out
until 4:30 a.m. election count day'
to watch himself squeeze in last
place by a four-vote margin.
But the ZBT's "bright young!
man" was nevertheless in.
Tapped by Sphinx honorary that1
spring, Willens in his junior year
climbed from SL committee work
to cabinet member-at-large to
president, as an idea man who
knew how to put his ideas to work.
IN THE person of its president,
SL got a scholarly former tennis
champion with a wit one member
characterizes as "Adlai Steven-
sonian" and a store of energy at
least as effective in "organizing"
as in covering an asphalt court.
In the SL presidency, Willens
got free dinners ("sometimes
four out of five a week"), posts

-Daily-Frank Barger

on the Student Affairs and Lec-
ture Committees and a chance
to put into effect his theories
on student government.
The theories: "SL must consoli-
date the progress of its six-year
tradition and at the same time at-
tempt to integrate itself within
the framework of the total campus
community."
"Difference of opinion is not
bad per se-but it should be aired
openly, with frankness and thor-
oughness and without fear of ad-
ministrative disapproval."
While Willens and theories
went to work on SL, Michigau-
ma, Pi Sigma Alpha political
science honorary and the na-
tionalncommittee to pick the
outstanding ZBT of 1952 all
looked in his direction at awrt d-
time.
His three roommates insist on
adding to the above record a count
against Willens for "lousiest apart-
ment dishwasher." Willens admits
he does the job "not well-but
fast."
Minus dishwashing ability, Wil-
lens, theories and ties now look
to a future of law or political sci-
ence study-possibly aiming at a
judicial post. Willens has put down
the gavel for the time being but.
chances are he will take it up
again.

'U' Hospital
Treatments
Aid Patients
University Hospital doctors real-
ize that for some patients medical
treatment alone is not enough.
In these cases the aid of the
hospital social service has proven
effective.
"Our job is to help the patient
make the maximum use of medical
care," Ruth Locher, social service
field consultant, explained.
THE SERVICES of the social
worker are called for when a pa-
tient worrying about personal
problems ornresisting medical
treatment~ is not recovering as het
should. After speaking to the pa-I
tient and his family, the social4
worker attempts to alleviate the
problems hindering recovery..
One of the cases in which a
social worker's aid helped both
the medical department and the
patient, concerned a man who
withdrew completely from oth-
er people and refused to coop-
erate in his treatment.
Upon speaking to the man, the
worker discovered that he thought
he was going to die. At the other
hospitals his case had been pro-
nounced hopeless, but University
Hospital doctors found a treat-
ment to save him.
When she explained the situa-
tion to him, he made more prog-
ress in three weeks than he had in
the preceding year. The social
worker also referred him to the
vocational rehabilitation agency
and now he is earning his own liv-
ing.
Miss Locher emphasized that
the function of the 23 member:
staff is more important in Univer-
sity Hospital than in other hos-
pitals because the patient's own
physician does not follow him into
the Hospital. The patient is apt
to feel that no one really cares
about him because of the stream
of medical people that work on
his case. "Personal contact with
one social worker helps decrease
the impersonality of the hospital,"
Miss Locher said.

HOWARD WILLENS
.". "let me explain SL"

a
(
PAUL THOMPKINS
ON THE HAMMOND
EVERY SUNDAY

Champs
University Hospital physician
Dr. David Freeman, world bad-
minton champion, will play
Kuldip Maini, Grad., all-cam-
pus champion and runner-up
for the Michigan title, in the
International Sport Night at
8 p.m. tomorrow in the Intra-
mural Bldg.
Other features scheduled for
the evening are exhibition
games from several foreign
countries, ping pong, volleyball
and tennis.
Psychology Club
To HoldMeeting
The newly-formed undergrad-
uate psychology club will hold its
first regular meeting at 3 p.m. to-
day in Rm. 3415 Mason Hall.

'Oscar' Film
Stars Davis
Six Academy awards have been
confered upon this week's Stu-
dent Legislature Cinema Guild
presentation, "All About Eve."
Starring Bette Davis as the
proud and erratic queeh of the
theater, "All About Eve" is a bit-
ing satire on Broadway and the
legitimate theater. It delves into
the lives and entanglements
among the actors, rivals, critics
and the host of others who make
up the Broadway scene.
Anne Baxter is starred as Eve,
and George Sanders as the cun-
ning critic.
Presentation of the film will be
at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday and Sat-
urday and at 8 p.m. Sunday at
the Architecture Auditorium. Ad-
mission is 50 cents.

how 'bout
DINING
this weekend
at
WEBER'S
ANN ARBOR'S
FAMOUS RESTAURANT
SPECIALIZING IN
* STEAK
* SEA FOOD
* CHICKEN
* PLANKED FOODS

I

.4

4,

I

.I

i

A ROOMY PARKING LOT FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE AT
welbf 0s sUp ch~ ub
Open Daily 12-12 - 3715 Jackson Road
Nine Minutes from Downtown

.4

Ri

L

i

I___ __ _ _

LISTEN!
Drive in and SHI
at

Op
OFTDRINKS * KEG BEER
r Sunday Noon to 7 P.M.
Phone 7191

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

-~~~-1

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

,!

* BEER * WINE SC
Open Daily 10 A.M.
114 E. Williams

" ."
'.
..

not +a blemish is sight t

(Continued from Page 4)
p.m. Unitarian Student Guild co-hostess.
All students invited.
Coming Events
The Labor Relations Law Section of
the State Bar of Michigan will present
a labor relations law workshop meet-
ing on Sat., Apr. 25, from 10 a.m. to 12
m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater. The subject is
"Rights of the Individual Under the
Collective Bargaining Agreement, With-
in the Union, and Under Taft-Hartley
Law." Among the participants are
Professor Clyde W. Summers of the
University of Buffalo Law School; Wil-
liam Otter of the University of Michigan
Law School (NLRB attorney on leave),
Leon Cousens; Paul Franseth; Gabriel
Alexander, General Motors/UAW-CIO
Umpire; and Mark L. Kahn of Wayne$
University, instructor in collective
bargaining. Faculty and students will
be admitted to these sessions free of
charge.
I.Z.F.A. offers positions for counsel-
lors at leading Jewish co-ed camp (10-
17 years campers) located in northern
Wisconsin. Interviews at Hillel Build-
ing, Sun., Apr. 26, at 2:15 p.m.

BI
Before deciding on your sterling,
stainless, crystal or china see our
beautiful selection of imported and
domestic patterns.
JOHN LEIDY
537 East Liberty * 6779

11

Nylon-Rayon
CORD
SUTin light blue, grey,
navy, charcoal
. . . /$17.50

11

I

21;

4

Sport Coats
Trousers .

I
4

I

$7.50

. . . ,

bra
., 2 re4

by LYDIA O'LEARY
Instantly, completely, Spotstik
conceals all skin blemishes-
eruptions; bruises; white, red,
own, blue spots. Easy-just pat
n, blend. Safe, soothing. Variety
of shades. Get Spotstik today-
kee* kandv in nurse. dre inz
uniy }125. iNo ze. tax.
x or large, permanent blemishes
-get COVERMARK cream.
Called "Modern Miracle" by
Reader's Digest. Medically
commended to completely cover
burn scars, vitiligo (brown and sooa
white patches) ... even
thmarks I $2.00, $4.50. No fed. tax.

"talk a Few StePs and Save Dollars"

7EAST LIBERTY

PHONE 8020

I1

q

v... __.- ., ___._. _ ._. _

J..--

MAST CAh

CALKINS-FLETCHER DRUGS
324 So. State - 818 So. State

"PUS>
TEEK-END
SPECIALS
Buy now and save A

I

WINTHROP
SHOES

I

I-

-n

Blue Suede
Smoked Elk
Brown Calf

LAST THREE DAYS...
Generation Magazine presents
Paintings & Drawings by
JOHN GOODYEAR

N
r s
r
;
,l ;::.:
,
<.
<x;
4i iii?'

_4

MEN!

r;l

on. your

summer
. Your

Sport
choice

L

55.

i

of Saddles, White Bucks
and Hand Sewn Oxfords.

'

,,,1

,,,

.w

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan