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April 23, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-23

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PAGE scarTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 1953

.

WON'T BE HUMAN FOSSIL:-
-'U'Geologist Values Humor

By FRAN 'SHELDON
'What I can't figure out is why
anyone would want to read about
me-my life has been pretty
quiet."
Enter Art Walker, '55.
"Hey Art, come on in. Want to
bust out into a little singing?"
They sing.
A . *
PROF. RUSSELL C. Hussey of
the geology department regards
his life as so ordinary that he can
see no reason why "anybody on
campus would be interested."
Prof. Hussey who studied
music and nearly majored in
English poetry during his un-
dergraduate days at the Uni-
versity wants to organize the
"Geology 65 Barbershop Quar-
tet" to perform on the last day
of classes "to send everyone off
with a good taste in their
mouths."
The Ohio-born geologist spent
his youth in Canyon City, Colo-
rado, and it was then that'he ac-
quired his love for the out-of-
doors.
* * *
QUICK TO point out that he
Nas "never a professional cow-
boy," "Doc" Hussey claims that
this phase of his life provided the
background for his whole philos-
ophy.
"I like a sense of humor and
a little horseplay once in a
while," he explained. "If I ever
lost my sense of humor I don't
know what I'd do. In my job I
work enough with fossils with-
out being one myself.
"Actually, I never could be a
stuffed shirt. I guess I've knocked
around the out-of-doors too much
and associated with too many
cowboys and prospectors.
REACHING for a prospector's
pan filled with rocks that "don't
have a particle of gold in any of
them," Hussey began to reminisce
about his 1915 trip through Cali-
fornia with a friend, Emmet Pen-
dleton. They toured the state giv-
ing musical programs.
"Pendleton played the piano,
and I sang baritone," he said.
"By gosh, I love to sing, though.
I guess when you get right down
to it, I've done a lot of things.
Had a grand time too. We sang
this-you know it, Art. Come
on."'
Interrupting himself in the mid-
dle of "Out of the Night That
Covers Me," Hussey expained that
he wanted "to get Art here in on1
Haugen Talks
On Language
With a little effort, people in the
three Scandinavian countries can
understand each other's languages,'
Prof. Einar Haugen of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin's Scandinavi-
an language department told a
meeting of the Linguistics Club1
yesterday.
Prof. Haugen attributed .simi-
larity of the languages to the fact
that all three countries had at one
time been under the rule of the
others.

Butt Views
Difficulties
lin Pakistan
Education and the learning of
the English language are the
greatest problems in Pakistan to-
day, Shamsuddin Butt, Grad., a
native of Pakistan, said yesterday.
Butt was guest lecturer at the
Speech Assembly in place of Rep.
Kit Clardy (R-Mich.) who was de-
tained in Washington.
He noted that misconceptions
people from his country have
about America are caused chiefly
by Hollywood movies which por-
tray all Americans as "nightclub
patrons, cowboys and bank-break-
ers"
But Americans have misconcep-
tions about Pakistan too, the grad-
uate student explained. He said
that Communist influence is weak
in the recently independent coun-
try despite a low standard of liv-
ing. There is a heavy drain on the
country's meager resources by a
class of people who "live on noth-
ing but charity," he added.
Butt pointed out that funda-
mentally Americans and Pakistan-
ians are alike. Differences result,
he said, from the scientific bent
of mind in Americans, freedom
of personality development in
America and lack of devotion to
duty in Pakistan which hinders in-
dustrial progress in that country.
Scott Speaks
On AsiaPolicy
The United States has a "tre-
mendous security stake" in south-
east Asian countries such as Bur-
ma which have relatively new gov-
ernments, Prof. Frank Scott of the
McGill University Law School said
yesterday.
He said that although the Bur-
mese government was relatively
stable, proximity to Communist
China and the presence of insur-
gents within the country's borders
forced her to follow a neutral for-
eign policy even though she is
democratically inclined.
The meeting was sponsored by
the economics and political science
departments.

liichigan Golfers Drop
Op ening Home Contest

* * * *

*' s

.4

--Daily-Don Campbell
PROF. RUSSELL C. HUSSEY
..geology 65 barbershopper
* * * ' * * *

this quartet, but he has too many
other things to do."
"IT'S EASY for extra-curricular
activities to absorb too much of
the student's time," he pointed
out. "Activities are fine, but you
are here for an education-at
least you're supposed to be.
"I was in the second Union Op-
era, and I sang with the Choral
Union. Actually, I did a lot of
singing, but that's the only kind
of activity I can remember. Play-
ed a little ball on campus too."
* * *
PROF. HUSSEY, who will re-
tire in four years, plans to do a
"lot of traveling" with his wife.
He wants to "go back to southern
France to take another look at,
the old caves.
"There were caveman fossils
there, and I'm very much in-
terested in them."
He also expects to return to
Colorado, and to continue his
present work at Escanaba on the
geologic history of Michigan.
* * *
IN LINE with his theory that
"students should be taught, with
proper guidance, to think for'
themselves," Prof. Hussey, in his
two geology courses, tries not to
inflict his own opinions on the
student.
"I merely present the facts,
and if a student doesn't think
they are convincing, that's up to
him."
He is pleased with the large en-
rollment in his course in evolution'
because many people misunder-
stand the term, he said.
HE CLAIMS that there is "too
much 'wet-nursing' in college to-{
lay" and feels that if a person
can't think while he is at the Uni-
versity, he will never learn.
Although he is author of sev-
eral books, Prof. Hussey is
proudest of his 3,000 slides

which he made himself as a
hobby. He colored most of them
by hand with a camel hair
brush and. Japanese watercol-
ors.
It is these slides that make both
of his courses worthwhile, accord-
ing to the professor.
"Without them the subject of
geology would be dead. We have
no geology here in the Midwest."
Hussey explains that he was
"just passing through on the way
to Colorado after the first world
war" when he was offered a job at
the University.
"Thought it over a couple of
days and decided to take it.
Never did make it back to the
West to live," he concluded.
He dug into a drawer and came
up with some papers.
"Hey, look what I found. -What
do you think of this: 'When you
were a tadpole and I was a fish in
the Paleozoic age, we . . ' "

THE PICTURE OF DETERMINATION-That's golfer Hugh Wright, captain of the Maize and Blue linksters. Beside him is Bill Huet.
teman, his U of D opponent. The two are watching the flight of a drive by Michigan's Warren Gast.

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WARREN GAST BERT KATZENMEYER
... tongue in cheek . . . checks scorecards

"THIS SHOT MEANS PAR"-Michigan captain Hugh Wright
says to himself. As Coach Bert Katzenmeyer and the gallery
watch in the background, Wright thinks things over. P.S. He
parred the hole.

A

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