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April 19, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-19

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SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

wolverines

Edge

Broncos,

5-4

CADDIES BRING GOLF TALENT:
Scholarships Insure 'M' Golf Future

'M'Reaches
_Semi-Finals
In Pin Meet
By DICK LEWIS
Michigan's bowling team edged
Wayne while Michigan State
trounced Michigan Normal as the
four-way collegiate pin tourney
completed its second round yes-
terday at the Union Alleys.
A 562 series by Ted Laitner pac-
ed the Wolverine keglers to their
narrow 2677-2669 victory over
Wayne, but the Tartars' Bill Du-
4puts, an erstwhile Michigan stu-
y' dent, captured high game and high
series honors.
DUPUIS, WHO competes in the
local Wednesday Night All-Cam-
pus League and only recently
transferred to the Detroit institu-
tion, turned in a sensational 201-
192-278 effort for a 671 total.
His astronomical final game,
achieved on two initial spares
followed by ten straight strikes,
almost knocked off Michigan,
defending co-champion in the
quadrangular arrangement.
But it was the balanced Wol-
verine entry that assured the
team's second straight league tri-
umph, its first being an easy score
over Michigan Normal a few weeks
ago.
* * *
FOUR PINS behind Laitner came
Chuck Barnhart with a 558 aggre-
gate, and he was followed by Bruce
4 Thorton, who knocked down 548,
mainly on the strength of a 225
third game.
Nonny Weinstock was next in
line for Michigan with his 542
total, while Jack Cross trailed
'n the Maize and Blue lineup
with 467. Cross was substituting
for the injured Phil Barad, who
was out with a sprained hand.
Michigan State's 2664 series was
13 points short of team honors,
but was enough to give the Spar-
tans a one-sided success over Nor-
mal's 2421 effort.
THE EAST LANSING five took
first place in the first round of
the tournament, but with its third
place finish yesterday now rests
second in the overall standings be-
hind Michigan.
Student bowlers are now ready-
ing for the Big Ten tournament to
be held at the Union Alleys next
Saturday. Eleven aspirants will
each roll nine lines this afternoon
to determine who will fill the five
available positions.
Major League
Standings

* * *

Wisniewski Gives Michigan
First Victory in Four StartsY

By BOB MARGOLIN
Special To The Daily
KALAMAZOO - Ray Fisher's
nine tallied three quick runs in
the first inning and went on to
squeeze by Western Michigan, 5-4,
yesterday as the thermometer reg-
istered 40 degrees here.
It was the first victory in four
games for the Wolverines who lost
to these same Broncos in Ann
Arbor Friday.
* * *
MARV WISNIEWSKI and Jack
Corbett shared the mound chores
for Michigan, while four Bronco
hurlers were used by losing coach
Charles Maher.

MARV WISNIEWSKI
. . . cops victory

Position Changes Mark First
Week of Spring Grid Practice

Several major position changes
have been the highlight of the
first week of spring football drills
at Ferry Field.
Captain Dick O'Shaughnessy,
long a fixture at center, has been
switched to right guard to make'
room for Dean Ludwig at the pivot
post.
* * *
LUDWIG, who suffered a crack-
ed bone in his neck at the outset
of last season, is potentially a
great linebacker. The coaching
staff has long felt that the six
foot two inch 200 pounder from
Marion, Ohio could break into the
starting line-up on the strength
of his defensive ability.
Ludwig has been teamed with
Lou Baldacci in the vital line-
backing spots. Neither will car-
ry much experience into next
fall's schedule, but both have
the physical make-up to fit the
position.
* * *
JOHN MORROW, formerly a
top prospect at tackle, has been
moved to center and linebacker.
Morrow is from Ann Arbor and
played prep school football at
Staunton Military Academy in
Virginia. He, like Ludwig and
Baldacci, has the physical make-
up for the linebacker spot.
The Michigan squad, after one
week of drills, has progressed
a great deal further than had
the team last year at this time.
The coaches started things off
the first day with some half-
speed contact work and have
moved into high gear with full
scale scrimmages dominating
the last two sessions.
Tony Branoff seems in mid-sea-
son form, especially on the wing-
back reverse which is so much a
part of the Michigan type offense.
The Flint sophomore has picked
up some speed over last season
and has been outrunning some
fast defensive halfbacks.
LAST YEAR, the only thing
anyone could find wrong in Bran-
off's running was a slight lack of
speed in starting. He did not seem
to have Frankie Howell's explo-
sive, bursting start. This spring,
however, Branoff has shown a
much greater ability to get off to
a fast start than he did last sea-
son. Given any kind of blocking
he is a devastating threat from
the right halfback position.
Fullback Dick Balzhiser has
been showing well on the "T"
plays where he can make use of
his speed; or as coach Wally
Weber might put it, "His ability
to place one foot in front of the
other with the greatest alacrity."
The ability coach Weber de-
scribes has also enabled Balz-

hiser to fit well in the defensive
picture as a halfback.
The battle for the quarterback
position continues to feature Bal-
dacci and Duncan McDonald. In
yesterday's scrimmage, Baldacci
ran the first string against Mc-
Donald's second string eleven.
Snowed Lnder
"Snow use," Michigan coaches
Don Canham and Bert Katzen-
meyer exclaimed as they made
the long trek back from a lost
weekend in Columbus.
The Buckeyes' home lair was
adorned by a fresh layer of the
white stuff-thus forcing can-
cellation of the annual Ohio
relays and a quadrangular golf
meet among Michigan, Purdue,
Indiana and Ohio State.
So 39 thinclads, six golfers,
three coaches and a trainer
started home last night, with
nothing more than a wild snow
ball fight to remember the
weekend by.
While the first stringers had the
better of the going, McDonald
looked good and was able to guide
his team on some long marches.
McDonald is making a tremen-
dous effort toacquire some block-
ing techniques, and his efforts
have resulted in a marked im-
provement.
Ray Kenaga, a quarterback who
saw limited action last season, has
been impressive especially in the
art of broken field running.
Spartan Baseball
Squad Rips Wayne
Two future opponents of the
Wolverine baseball squad battled
yesterday with Michigan State
opening its season by walloping
Wayne University, 15-0.
Michigan State scored four
runs in the fourth inning, four in
the sixth, added two more in the
seventh, and five in the eighth.
In the fourth inning three hits
and two errors accounted for the
four runs highlighted by Stn
Turner's double. In 'he sixth, the
four runs came on thre singles
and an error. Wayne went all to
pieces in the eighth inning, allow-
ing five runs on a walk, a wild
pitch, an error, and a passed ball.
Wayne made only four hits to 11
for Michigan State. Wally Banks
of Wayne had two doubles and a
single to account for three of the
four hits. MSC's Bob Dangl, who
worked the first five innings was
the winning pitcher. Bob Pershing
was the loser.

The Wolverines were able to
collect only five hits, but each
safety figured in the scoring.
They shelled starter Gary Gra-
ham out of the game with a three
hit barrage coupled with a walk
in therinitialcframe. Don Eaddy's
triple to right center was the big
blow of the inning.
* * *
RELIEFER Ken Tucker stopped
the next six men in order but
gave up another run in the third
frame on a walk to Jack Corbett,
a single by Eaddy and Bill Bill-
ing's fly to center. The run al-
most didn't count as Eaddy, think-
ing there were two out, churned
the base paths and was easily
doubled at first.
A walk to Eaddy, a single by
Billings and Ray Pavichevich's
fly to center accounted for the
last Maize and Blue run in the
sixth. After that, Tucker, Ron
Davies and Rog Egeers retired
the last eleven Wolverine bat-
ters in order.
Winner Wisniewski gave up only
two hits and two unearned runs
in his five inning stint as he
whiffed one batter in the first four
frames and two in the fifth.
HIS SUCCESSOR Corbett, how-
ever, found the going rough as
Broncos fought an uphill battle
that was almost successful. Only
spectacular fielding plays in the
eighth and ninth innings saved
the game for the Wolverines.
Corbett got himself in trouble
in the sixth frame by donating
three free passes to first. But
only one run crossed the plate,
this as a result of an infield out.
In the eighth stanza, a great
shoestring catch by center fielder
Billings saved more trouble as the
Broncos went on to fill the bases
on two singles and a walk. But
Corbett got pinch hitter Paul Ab-
raham to end the inning by hit-
ting into a force out at second.
With Michigan ahead, 5-3, in
the ninth, Corbett's fifth and
sixth free passes of his four inning
stint nearly proved his undoing.
However, Don Eaddy put a crimp
in Western Michigan's plans by
robbing Al Nagel of a sure single
to left and converting the hot
grounder into a twin killing on a
~sensational play.
A few minutes later, an error
by Eaddy on an almost identical
play allowed the Bronco's final run
to cross the plate.
* *

BUD STEVENS
. . .Standish-Evans product
A a dT.o.B y Scandura,
Tinkharn
Dave Tinkham and Joe Scan-
dura were named winners of
awards for proficiency in schol-
arship and athletics yesterday by,
the Board. in Control of Intercol-
legiate Athletics.
Tinkham, a senior from Grand
Rapids, was awarded the Western
Conference Medal, while Scan-
dura, a letterman wrestler from
IBrightwaters, New York, received
the Board in Control Scholarship
Award of 100 dollars.
Announcement of the awards
was made by H. O. "Fritz" Cris-
ler, chairman of the board.
Tinkham was one of the main-
stays of Michigan's defensive
backfield during his playing ca-
reer. He was always one of the
fastest men on the squad, and
was one of the deadliest tacklers
of recent years.
He saw little offensive action,
though capable of playing both
fullback and right halfback. His
point average was 2.86 in the
School of Business Administration.
SCANDURA, who was a member
of Michigan's Big Ten wrestling
championship team this past sea-
son, compiled a 3.4 average in the
School of Education.
Tinkham succeeds Don Mc-
Ewen as winner of the Big Ten
Medal, while Scandura follows for-
mer tennis star Steve Bromberg
as recipient of the Board in Con-
trol scholarship.
Michigan's head football coach
Bennie Oosterbaan won the Big
( Ten Medal in 1928.

By JIM DYGERT
The Standish-Evans Scholars is
an organization loaded with golf
talent that will provide par-break-
ers for Coach Bert Katzemmeyer's
links squad for many years to
come.
Already on the varsity team is
Standish-Evans Scholar Bud Stev-
ens, who captured the all-campus
golf championship as a freshman
in 1952. Currently playing the
number one position, Stevens is
expected to be an important fac-
tor in Michigan's golf success for
the next three years.
THIS PROMISING young golf-
er is only the first of the organ-
ization to appear on the Wolverine
sports scene because the Standish-
Evans Scholars is also young. The
fall of 1952 saw the birth of tre
Michigan chapter of the Standish-
Evans Scholars as an organiza-
tion.
Although there had been a
few Standish-Evans Scholars on
the campus previously, there
were not enough to merit a for-
mal organization until last year
when a dozen incoming fresh-
men bolstered its ranks.
The Standish-Evans Scholars
are attending the University of
Michigan on scholarships donated
by the Western Golf Association
and the l5etroit District Golf As-
sociation. The name, Standish-
Evans, is in honor of the two fam-
ous golfers who initiated and pio-
neered the scholarship idea, James
Standish and 'Chick' Evans.
. *
THE SCHOLARSHIP is offered
to caddies of member clubs in the
WGA and DDGA. Requirements
include two years as a caddie in
good standing, position in the top
quarter of the caddie's high school
graduating class, and recommen-
dations from the officials of the
club where the caddie works.
A caddie has a job that teaches
him a great deal about the
woods and irons game. Moreover,
most clubs usually set aside one
day of the week on which the
caddies can play on the course.
Many clubs also have teams
made up of their best caddie
golfers for caddie and junior
tournaments.
For these reasons a caddie often
becomes an exceptional golfer, a
fact illustrated by the many golf-
ing greats that have come up
through the caddie ranks, notably
Evans, Ben Hogan, and Sam
Snead.
IT IS ALSO for these reasons
that Michigan's golf future looks
bright. Men with plenty of exper-
ience will be playing golf for the
Wolverines. Similar Scholar or-
ganizations at Northwestern and
Illinois have already shown their
proficiency on Big Ten links.
Although the majority of the
present Scholars are freshmen, a
number of them have already
shown their interest in playing

golf for Michigan by reporting to
Katzenmeyer this spring.
,* * *
SOPHOMORE Bob Stevens is
among the varsity prospects work-
ing out at the University golf
course. There are also four Schol-
ars trying for the freshman golf
squad
Among the freshman aspir-
ants is Bob McMasters from
Red Run in Royal Oak, Michi-
gan. McMasters was the Michi-
gan state high school champion
in 1952, a member of the record
setting state high school cham-
pionship team in 1951, and run-
ner-up. in .the . state . Junior

Chamber of Commerce cham-
pionship in 1951.
Another is Ray Zanarini from
Exmoor Country Club in Highland
Park, Illinois. He was a member
of the Highland Park High School
team that won the Illinois state
high school title in 1952. His in-
dividual score was fifth best in the
tourney.
The others are Maynard Nieboer,
who was runner-up in the Kala-
mazoo's junior tournament in
1951, and Jim Holmes, who was
the captain of the Toledo Central
High School team in 1952, win-
ner of the Toledo city champion-
ship that year.

r

Erg

THE AUTOMATIC CONTROL
INDUSTRY .
offers unusual opportunities for in-
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Electrical and Mechanical Engineer-
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SALES ENGINEERING
DESIGN ENGINEERING
PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
PENN CONTROLS, Inc., a leader in this ex-
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Air Conditioning, Heating, Refrigeration, and
Appliance control practice; leading to as-
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You are invited to meet with the
PENN representative.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS April 20
Morning at EE; Afternoon at ME
PENN CONTROLS, inc.
GOSHEN, INDIANA

1'

MICHIGAN
Mogk, ss
Lepley, If
Corbett, rf-p
Eaddy, 3b
Billings, cf
Pavichevich, lb
Sabuco, 2b
Leach, c
Wisniewski, p
Fancher, rf

AB
4
3
3
4
4
4
4
3
2
1
32

AMERICAN LEAGUE

W
St. Louis 4
New York 3
Cleveland 2
Boston 1
Philadelphia 2
Chicago 2
Detroit 1
Washington 0
YESTERDAY'S

L Pet.
1 .800
1 .750
2 .500
1 .500
2 .500
2 .500
4 .200
2 .000
RESULTS

GB
-'-z
1
1% 4
1
3
2% 2

St. Louis 8-3, Detroit 7-2
Chicago 7, Cleveland 6
Boston at Washington (rain)
New York at Philadelphia (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Detroit-Trucks (1-0)
v. Newhouser (0-0) or Garver (0-1)
Cleveland at Chicago - (2) - Lemon
(1-0) and Garcia (0-0) v. Bearden
(0-0) and Fornieles (0-0)
Boston at Washington-Grissom (0-0)
v. Marrero (0-0)
New York at Philadelphia (2)-Black
well (0-0) and Ford (0-0) v. Kellner
(1-0) and Shantz (0-1)

WESTERN A
Lajoie, cf
Diment, If (3rd)'
Lee, rf (9th)
Horn, c
Nagel, 1f-cf
Gottschalk, 2b
Jackson, lb
Heaviland, 3b
Emaar, rf
Graham, p
Tucker, p
Egeers, p
Davies, p
Stevenson*
Hayes**
J. Emaar***
Abraham.***

AB
1
2
0
3
5
3
5
4
0
2
0
0
1
1
0
2
31

R
0
1
2T
0
0
0
0
0
5
R
0
0
0
0
0
I
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-
4

H
0
0
2
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
a
0
0
a
1
0
1
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6

P.O. A.
3 1
2 0
1 2
2 2
4 0
3 1
2 4
7 1
1 0
0 0
27 10
P.O. A.
1 1
1 0
1 0
4 0
2 0
34
11 0
1 3
1 0
0 0
0 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 'o
0 0
0' 0
25 10

JUST OPENED!!
Gifts for the Kiddies
Come in and get your FREE TICKET
for Home Appliances
FINEST PRODUCTS BEST SERVICE
CAR WASHING AND COMPLETE SERVICE1
PLUS SPEEDY ROAD SERVICE
TRAVIS TEXACO SERVICE
414 East William at Thompson
(Across from St. Mary's Chapel)
Phone 8882

for/the

C

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ERA

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NATION

Brooklyn
Milwaukee
New York
y Chicago
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Cincinnati

NAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
3 1 .750
2 1 .667
2 2 .500
1 1 .500
1 1 .500
1 2 .333
1 2 .333
1 2 .333

GB
1/
1
1
1
1
1 2
12

* Hit for Lojoie in 3rd
T Hit for Tucker in 6th
l***Hit for Egeers in 8th
[****Hit for Diment In 8th

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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn at New York (cold)
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (cold)
Milwaukee at St. Louis (snow)
Chicago at Cincinnati (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at New York-Roberts
(0-1) v. Jansen (1-0)
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh-Erskine (0-0)
v. Dickson (1-1)
Milwaukee at St. Louis-Antonelli
(0-0) or Bickford (0-0) v. Staley
(0-1)
Chicago at Cincinnati (2)--Rush (1-0)
and Minner (0-0) v. Wehmeler
'(0-0) and Perskowski (0-0)
COLLEGIATE CUTS
FOR SPRING!!
They're Individualistic-
Suave, Smart-
8 STYLISTS
NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

BALLET
POSTPONED
The Slavenska-Franklin Ballet Company per-
formance scheduled for Thursday at the Mich-
igan Theater has been postponed until next
Fall.

Israel Independence Day
Sunday, April 19
PROF. PRESTON SLOSSON
Guest Speaker at 3:00 P.M.
DANCE AND CARNIVAL
7-.10:30

Contina 35

Contax

We also carry

Zeiss, Rolle,

Sterea, Kodak, and Argus.

I

Come in and let's talk caimerc

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