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April 18, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-18

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?'AcmTO~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1953

. .I I

Presentation
To Be Made
Israelis
University students from Israel
will present a bronze plaque to the
International Center today in re-
cognition of "assistance given to
all foreign students on campus,"
according to Rabbi Herschel Ly-
mon, head of the Hillel Founda-
tion.
The presentation, which will be
at 11 a.m. in the International
Center, will inaugurate a weekend
celebration of the fifth anniver-
sary of Israel's independence. An
all-day program at the Center to-
morrow will continue the festi-
vities.
Featured tomorrow will be ex-
hibits of Israeli culture, an ad-
dress by Prof. Preston W. Slosson
of the history department at 3 p.-
m. and a buffet supper. A carnival,
with dancing, refreshments and
prizes will be held in the evening.
The public is invited to all of to-
morrow's events at the Center.
There will be no admission
charge.

Sailing Races
Michigan's 15th annual In-
vitational Sailing Regatta will
begin at 9:30 a.m. today, with
boats from Big Ten schools un-
furling their sails on Whitmore
Lake.
In 22 races lasting all day to-
day and tomorrow, the schools
will compete for the rotating
National Collegiate Sailing As-
sociation trophy. Bob Allen,
'54E, and Gordon Nelson, '53E,
will sail for the University.
Kauper To Runi
In Charter Race
Prof. Paul G. Kauper of the
Law School and Karl Karsian, in-
structor in Ann Arbor High
School, were nominated yesterday
for the Charter Study Commis-
sion.
Nine persons will be elected
June 2 to serve on the commis-
sion, which will suggest revisions
in Ann Arbor's city charter.
Philatelists Meet
Ann Arbor's Stamp Club will
be hosts today and tomorrow to
the Peninsular State Philatelic
Society, now holding its 15th an-
nual convention in the Union.

PRESIDENT'S ASSISTANT:
Trolley Ride Leads to Long 'U' Stay
* * * y*:
By ERIC VETTER .. ES~yg

I MAY FESTIVAL

THURS., APR. 30, 8:30
FRI., MAY 1, 8:30
SAT., MAY 2, 2:30

SAT. MAY 2, 8:30
SUN., MAY 3, 2:30
SUN., MAY 3, 8:30

TICKETS - $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER

THE AUTOMATIC CONTROL
INDUSTRY A
offers unusual opportunities for in-
teresting work and advancement to
Electrical and Mechanical Engineer-
ing graduates.
SALES ENGINEERING
DESIGN ENGINEERING
PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
PENN CONTROLS, Inc., a leader in this ex-
panding industry, offers intensive training in
Air Conditioning, Heating, Refrigeration, and
Appliance control practice; leading to as-
signments in Sales, Development and Pro-
duction Engineering.
You are invited to meet with the
PENN representative.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS April 20
Morning at EE; Afternoon at ME
PENN CONTROLS, Inc.
GOSHEN, INDIANA

Back in 1912, Frank E. Robbins
got off a train in Ann Arbor and
hopped on a trolley car to Prof.
Campbell Bonner's home.
That trolley car ride destined
Robbins to a stay at the University
which has seen him watch ten sets
of graduating classes come and go.
It was a hot summer day when
Robbins made his way to Prof.
Bonner to confirm a job as an
instructor in the Greek depart-
ment.
w*
THE UNIVERSITY had about
7,500 students and Hill Auditor-
ium had just been built. There
were no men's dormitories and
only Betsy Barbour, Helen New-
berry and Martha Cook housed
women.
"We thought the University
was getting pretty big when we
hit an enrollment of 10,000,"
Robbins said, "and nobody then
imagined we would become as
large as we are today."
By 1921, Robbins had become an
assistant professor and was chair-
man of the classification commit-
tee during student registration.
One day while working at registra-
tion he was told that President
Marion L. Burton wanted to see
him in his office.
"He asked me if I wanted to be
his assistant, and I said yes."
That's how Robbins describes his
appointment in 1921 to the job
which he still holds, that of As-
sistant to the President.
SINCE HIS appointment, four
presidents have reigned over the
University. "President Clarence
Cook Little was the most contro-
versial," Robbins says, "but as a
whole they all have been easy to
get along with."
The authority on University
life terms the war years of 1917-
18 the most hectic in his long
stay here. "We had what was
known as the Student Army
Training Corps which corres-
ponds with ROTC today. Many
of the men were barracked in
the Union, which was "pretty
much walls and floors at the
time," he explained.
"In a large size shed, known as
the Union annex, the men set up
a mess hall. The SATC didn't do
too much and perhaps its greatest
function was to show what should-
School Bands
To Play Today
Bands from 67 State high
schools and junior high schools
will attend the Michigan School
Band and Orchestra Festival to-
day in Ann Arbor.
Concerts in the festival, which
is sponsored by the Michigan
School Band and Orchestra As-
sociation and the School of Music,
will be presented from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. today. The bands will play
in Hill Auditorium, Slosson Jun-
ior High School, Ann Arbor High
School and Tappan Junior High
School.
The young musicians are first
division winners in district con-
tests held this year throughout
the State.
'Hamilton Woman'
To Be Presented
"That Hamilton Woman," star-
ring Laurence Olivier and Vivian
Leigh, will be shown at 7 and 9
p.m. today and at 8 p.m. tomorrow
in the Architecture Auditorium.
Sponsored by the Student Legis-
lature-Cinema Guild, the histori-
cal drama reveals the secret ro-
mance between the famed Lord
Nelson and Lady Hamilton.

New LS&A
Catalogues
Now Ready
Literary college bulletins for
1953-54 are now available in the
Administration Bldg., Burton D.
Thuma, Associate Dean of the lit-
erary college, announced yester-
day.
Containing information about
course content, concentration and
distribution requirements and Uni-
versity regulations, the catalogues
are published each spring to aid
students in making out their pro-
grams.
This year, a Literary College
committee is seeking student and
faculty opinion to determine
whether the announcements are
adequately serving their purpose.
The committee is planning a com-
plete revision of the announce-
ments.
Changes planned for the 1954-
55 announcement will involve
mainly organization, typography
and layout. A special section for
freshmen is also planned.
Dean Thuma, chairman of the
committee, has asked that stu-
dents who ' have suggestions on
ways to improve the announce-
ment report them to the com-
mittee.

(Continued from Page 2)

day, and how to apply it in the present
world situation. Eight weeks. $6.00.
Instructor: Professor Leroy waterman.
Toe class will meet Monday evening,
Apr. 20, at 7:30 in 131 School of Busi-
ness Administration.
Interdepartmental Seminar on Meth-
ods of Machine Computation. Meeting
at 4:30 p.m., Mon., Apr. 20, 429 Mason
Hall, "Problems Solved on the Univer-
sity of Michigan Card-Programmed
Calculator," Bruce Arden, University
Tabulating Service.
Actuarial Seminar will meet at 10
a.m., Sat., Apr. 18,. 3017 Angell Hall.
Dr. Nesbitt will speak on "Symmetric
Expectancies"
Events Today
Board of Representatives. Special
meeting this forenoon at 10 in the
League. voting on the new League or-
ganization plan.
Faculty Sports Night. IM Building,
tonight from 7:30 to 10:00 p.m. All
equipment will be available to faculty
families. Children may only come with
their parents.
Saturday Luncheon Discussion Group
Lane Hall, 12:15 p.m. Student Discus-
sion.

1I

Coming Events
Phi Sigma Society.. "Some Aspects of
Adrenocortical Hormone Action," by Dr.
Burton L. Baker, Professor of Anatomy,
and "The Antibiotics and Terramycin,"
a movie in color, Rackham Amphithea-
ter. 8 p.m., Mon., Apr. 20. Open to the
public. Business meeting at 7:40 p.m.
Inaugural ceremonies for the installa-
tion of new officers. All members are
encouraged to attend.
Hillel. Israel Independence Day will
be celebrated Sun., Apr. 19. Among the
festivities will be a carnival from 7
to 10:30 p.m. at the Hillel Building,
with carnival-typetbooths,1dancing to
Paul McDonough's orchestra, refresh-
ments, and prizes. Admission free.
Everyone welcome.
The Political Science Round Table
will meet on Wed., Apr. 22, at 7:45 p.m.
in the Rackham Amphitheater. Dr.
Herbert A. Simon, chairman of the De-
partment of Industrial Management at
the Carnegie Institute of Technology,
will speak on "Research Problems in
the Administrative Process." All in-
terested persons invited.
Faculty Luncheon Tues., Apr. 21,
Michigan Union. Gerald Heard, author
and lecturer, guest speaker. Phone Lane
Hall, Ext. 2851, for reservations.

UNIVERSITY AUTHORITY-Assistant to the President Frank
E. Robbins turns back the calendar to recall tales of the Uni-
versity's past.

Dickerman Fills
Education Post

n't be done by a University in war
time," he said.
ONE OF THE early members'
of 'The Apostles,' a club for ba-
chelor faculty members, Robbins
saw it succumb in 1943. "The wife
of President Angell helped chris-
ten the club in 1899," Robbins
said, "and I joined shortly after
arriving on campus."
"We rented a house where
some of the men roomed and
had a large board table for any
member who wanted to eat
there," he said. We moved sev-
eral times, he continued, but fi-
nally bought a place at 1015

4

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Church for our own. "World
War II caused a shortage of help
so we silently disbanded," Rob-
bins explained.
Switching to his hobbies, Rob-
bins said "painting landscapes in
watercolor is my favorite amuse-
ment." Rocks on the coast of
Maine and winter scenes are my
favorite subjects, he added.
Robbins' literary endeavors in-
clude considerable research work
in Greek prose with emphasis on
philosophy and science. Among his

Prof. Watson Dickerman of the
education department has been
elected publications committee
chairman of the Adult Education
Association, University officials
announced yesterday.
Club Disbanded
Future meetings of the WAA
riding club will be cancelled be-
cause of the lack of available sta-

t

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'I
I
I

Marshall's Treasi

r

Special For
Saturday Only
59c
SCHRATZ
BUBBLE BATH
2 for 60c
MARSHALL'S DRUG

orks are translations of the
xreek astronomer Ptolemy, which
as published early in World War
I and studies of Greek arithmetic.
mite Aunt Clue r
ITODAY'S I
CLUE
"A certain building
big and tall, would no
doubt hit me, should
it fall." '
-- 235 S. State

bles, it was announced yesterday.
r

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- - - - - - - --

9

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Discussion Class. Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "The Strategy of Jesus."
Dr. Elton Trueblood, professor of philosophy at
Earlham College, speaker.
5:30 P.M.: Student fellowship supper, social hall.
6:45 P.M.: Program, Dr. Elton Trueblood, Henry
Martin. Loud Lecturer, will speak on "The
Radical Gospel."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms open daily.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
--4
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Bible School.
11:00 A.M.: Rev. Wesley A. Carlson, Missionary
Guest Speaker.
5:45 P.M.: Grace Bible Supper with the mis-
sionaries.
7:00 P.M.: Pictures of India, "Fulfilling a
Vision." Rev. Raymond H. Joyce, Missionary
Guest Speaker.
You are invited to attend sessions of our Mission-
ary Conference, nightly at 7:00 through Wed-
nesday night.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
William S. Baker, University Pastor
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Sunday Morning Services:
9:15 A.M.: Charles Mitchell preaching on,
"The Security of Faith."
11:15 A.M.: William Baker preaching on,
"Pride and Piety."
Sunday Morning 10:30: Student Bible Seminar.
Sunday Evening 6:30: Westminster Guild meets at
Student Center to go to Methodist Church to
hear Alton Trueblood.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
North Division at Catherine
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary.
9:50 A.M.: Student Breakfast, Cahterbury House.
11:00 A.M. to 12:15: Bassinette Nursery, Canter-
bury House.
4:30 P.M.: Brotherhood of St. Andrew. Lounge.
5:15 P.M.: "Challenge in the Sun," a movie.
High School Club Room, Page Hall.
6:45 P.M.: Bible Study. University Students,
Canterbury House.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayers.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Sts.
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Design For Life."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House 438 Maynard
H. L. Pickerill, Director
6:00 P.M.: Supper at the Congregational Church.
Election of officers for next year. Then the
group will go to hear Elton Trueblood.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan).
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. AUDITORIUM
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth"
WXYZ-ABC Network
Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Mrs. Ruth Mars, Assistant Student Counselor
9:45 A.M.: Student Bible Class studies "Malachi"
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship. Sermon, "Marks of
Disciplship-Neighborliness."
6:30 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Meet at
Chapman Room to hear Dr. Elton Trueblood
in Methodist Church.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenu'-
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "Glorifying the Gospel."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Bible Study, "God's
Answers to Modern Questions."
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Dailyat 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M. 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Basement of Chapel.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION

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FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group.
11:00 A.M.: Services broadcast on WPAG.
Sermon by Edward H. Redman, "Freedom is
Indivisible."
5:15 P.M.: Unitarian Junior High Group at the
church.
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group.

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