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February 10, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

A-

'U' Receives
$183,461
In Grants
(Continued from Page 1)
stration to be conducted next
September.
Scholarship funds were swelled
by several gifts with the largest
being $2,525 from several donors
for the 1916 Law Class Memorial
Scholarship Fund.
OTHER SCHOLARSHIP grants
include $1,000 gifts for the Gom-
berg Scholarship Fund, the To-
ledo Scholarship Fund and the
Universal Oil Chemical Engineer-
ing Scholarship Fund.
Smaller donations include $350
for the 'M' Club Scholarship,
$350 for an accounting scholar-
ship, $150 for the Edwin J. Math-
er Scholarship Fund and $100
for stipends to journalism stu-
dents.
Fellowship grants included a
$1,500 addition to the Michigan
Heart Association 'Memorial Fund
and $1,320: for the University Press
Club Foreign Journalism Fellow-
ships.

Events of the Week

.WEDNESDAt
Prof. A. Geoffrey Norman of the botany department and re-
search biochemist in the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project will
speak on "Food for the Future: The Trend of Crop Production and
Some Probtems in Plant Physiology" at the public Sigma Xi lecture,
8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Hockey-Michigan vs. Michigan State College, 8 p.m., Coliseum.
THURSDAY
The Choral Union. Concert Series will present the Minneapolis
Symphony Orchestra, 8:30 p.m., Hill Auditorium.
FRIDAY
"France Today" will be discussed by Ian Forbes Fraser, Director
of the American Library in Paris, under the auspices of the library
science department at 4:15 p.m. in Rackham Amphitheater.
"Music Heaven," 25th annual Sophomore Caberet, will be
held from 8 to 12 p.m. in the League. The floorshow, "The Lost
Chord in Music Heaven," will be performed at 9 and 10:30 p.m.,
through Saturday.
"Lost Horizons" is the SL Cinema Guild film to be shown at 7
and 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 8 p.m. Sunday at the Architecture
Auditorium.
SATURDAY
Indoor track meet-Michigan vs. University of Illinois, 8 p.m.,
Yost Field House.
Wrestling-Michigan vs. University of Illinois, 8 p.m., Sports

RESERVED PARKING SPACE
AVAILABLE
at Municipal Parking Lot, 616 South Forest Ave.
Just off South University
RATES: $5.00 per month in advance.
Call at CITY ENGINEER'S OFFICE
2nd Floor, City Hall or Phone 2-6583 Ext. 10.
Don't Get Ulcers This Semester

Start a Hobby and Relax.

There is nothing like a hobby to take away
"Brain Fag" and relax taut muscles. Come in
and let us help you select a hobby that will suit,
your requirements.
Model Planes-Cars-Ships-Railroads-Craft Materils

TWO $500 GRANTS for cancer
research, a $1,000 gift for the Law
School Summer Institute and $900
for the Cooley Memorial Bldg.
were also accepted along with gifts
of lesser amounts.
The Regents also changed reg-
ulations governing Michigan res-
ident requirements for aliens to
qualify as state residents if law-
fully admitted for permanent
residence in the United States
and other state resident require-
nments are met.
Adjusted to comply with the
neW immigration laws, the rule
changes eliminate the necessity of
aliens taking out first papers to
qualify as state residents.
Faculty action at the meeting
included the promotion to Asso-
ciate Professor of Kenneth M.
Case, of the physics department,
the naming of Prof. Amos M. Haw-
ley, of the sociology department,
to the executive committee of the
literary college for the spring
semester and the appointment of
Prof. Chester Slawson as acting
chairman of the mineralogy de-
partment.
A sabbatical leave was given
Prof. Donald G. Marquis, of the
psychology department and leave
extension for Prof. Charles W:
Good, of the mechanical engineer-
ing department, was granted.
Other Regent action included
the acceptance of hisWrical docu-
ments for the Clements Library
and a memoir recognition of the
"untimely death" of the late Prof.
Carlos Lopez, of the school of
architecture and design.

Bldg.
Gymnastics-Michigan vs. University of Illinois, 8 p.m., Sports
Bldg.
* * * *
SUNDAY
Marilyn Mason Brown will present an organ recital, 4:15 p.m.,
Hill Auditorium.
1~ I

RWLPS

-i -

HOBBY SHOP
115 W. Liberty St.

r°jl A .

Have You Heard?
Good news for those of you who have
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We know that these are the qualities for which you
are looking in a position:

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..EARTHQUAKE.

NOW...10 Months Scientific Evidence
MDICAL SPECIALIST is r-aking regular bin
For Chesterfield Amonthly examinations of a group of people
from various walks of life. 45 percent of this
group have smoked Chesterfield for an average
of over ten years.
After ten months, the medical specialist reports
>>:that he observed...
{ vno adverse effects on the nose, throat and
sinuses of the group from smoking Chesterfield
s'r f? is 1MUCH MIjfLA DER

In the predawn of last July 21, the most
severe California earthquake. since 1906 struck
the small town of Tehachapi.
Walls were collapsing, buildings were fold-
ing. The town's telephone office shook to its
foundation. But the night operator remained
at her switchboard until it went dead. Main
cables to the office were pulled to the ground
when a nearby wall caved in.
This was at 4:50 A.M.

By 9 P.M. two TV stations were sending live
telecasts of the damage. Telephone men had
established a radio-relay system in less than
12 hours.
It was a typical disaster-brutal and un-
announced. But telephone men were prepared.
They quickly restored communication when
it was needed most. They demonstrated the
resourcefulness and technical skill typical of
telephone people.

;,

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