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April 16, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-16

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PAGE EWORT

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1958

I I

AMERICAN PREMIERE:
Arts Theatre Will Present Krog Play

By ARLENE LISS
Arts Theater will present the3
American premiere of "On the
Way" by Helge Krog as its final
Spring production, 8:30 p.m. Fri-
day.
Krog, who is highly esteemed in
his native Norway is also regard-
ed as the "enfant terrible" of the
Norwegian theater. Although well
known in Europe, his works have
not been presented before in
America.

* * *

*

HSC Invasion
What do University students
dislike about Michigan State
College?
This will be one of the ques-
tions asked today by a "fact
finding" committee from the
MSC humor magazine, the
"Spartan." Three carloads of
MSC students are in Ann Ar-
bor to get material for the May
issue which is to be an expose
of the University.
The MSC group plans to get
material by taking pictures,
dating Michigan coeds and at-
tending classes.
March issues of the MSC
Spartan will be sold from 3:30
to 4 p.m. today in front of the
Library.

New Battery Preservative
Unknown In Ann Arbor

14

"It is astonishing that he is not
known in this country," com-
mented Strowan Robertson, di-
rector of the Arts Theater. "Most
Americans labor under the illu-
"sion that Norwegiandrama stop-
ped with Ibsen, but it continued
and is still flourishing," he added.
According to Robertson one
of the difficulties of presenting
theater - in - the - round is the
problem of sets. In the cur-
rent production the group has
come up with a unique answer
to this problem.
Herman Baker has designed a
"horizontal backdrop," painted
in abstract style. The furniture
for the play is also arranged on
abstract shapes. "It's almost im-
possible to get the effect of a room
in our theater," said Baker, "but
this is an attempt to create such
an effect."
* * *
DESCRIBED as the "personal
equation of the play," the blue,
tan and grey backdrop serves as a
starting point for the rest of the
set. In the first act the furniture
is arranged parallel and perpen-
dicular on the painted floor, in
the second it is arranged diagonal-
ly.
Through the backdrop and the
rest of the set, Baker has tried
to capture the flavor of the
early 1930's, the period of the
play. The idea for the color and
atmosphere was derived from a
1932 painting by Paul Klee,
"North Room."
Gray To Address
Mathematicians
Paul Gray, assistant technical
editor of Willow Run Research
Center, will address the seminar
in Applied Mathematics at 4 p.m.
today in 247 West Engineering
Bldg.
His topic is "Applications of
Schwartz's Theory of Distribu-
tions to Differential Equations."

-Daily-Jeff Pemberton
PLAYERS REHEARSE ON ABSTRACT BACKDROP.
Singing, Weavtng, Ceramics
Help Rehabilitate Dysphasics

By PAT ROELOFS
Singing, weaving and ceramics
are more than just hobbies for
dysphasia victims at the University
Speech Clinic.
Occupational and music therapy
play important roles in the re-
habilitation of these patients.
Daily music classes and periods of
occupational treatment are rou-
tine for patients whose language
process has been partially impaired
by some traumatic experience.
CLINICIAN Harold S. Edmun-
son, director of the singing class,
said music is emphasized in the
therapy program to increase the
vocabulary of the dysphasia vic-
tims. Familiar songs containing
words once used by the patients
are sung to help them recall these
words.
Often a patient may not be
able to read the words, but when
put to music the barrier of pro-

nunciation, for an unknown rea-
son, disappears, he said.
Edmunson now has a singing
class of eight men who practice
for one hour every day. Harmon-
izing a familiar song, "Smile a
While," the men report that the
class is their favorite part of the
Clinic adjustment program.
Many of the patients who have
partial paralysis caused by acci-
dents which also impaired their
speech process, attend occuliational
therapy classes at University Hos-
pital.
Weaving, operating a printing
press and ceramics, help to ex-
ercise injured muscles. A weekly
bowling tournament has recently
been added to the physical ther-
apy program to aid the patients.

tomic Energy
lamifications
)iscussed
Three speakers discussing the
npact of atomic energy on re-
arch before a meeting of the
niversity's Research Club, ex-
ored the ramifications of recent
;omic discoveries, yesterday.
Dr. Henry Gomberg, Assistant
irector of the Phoenix Project,
:edicted that in future years the
orld would not be limited by a
,ek of energy reserves.
He pointed out that at the pres-
nt time the known uranium de-
osits are more than 23 times the
nount of coal deposits.
Dr. Muriel Myers, assistant pro-
ssor of Internal Medicine in
mpson Memorial Institute, stat-
d that radio active isotopes are
ow being used in medical fields
>r research, diagnosis and treat-
ent. However, she said, scien-
sts are still uncertain whether
here can be adverse after effects
a treating disease with isotopes.
Dean E. Blythe Stason of the
aw School discussed the legal as-
ects of research in atomic energy.
,orneil Professor
Fill SpeakToday
Prof. Wallace S. Sayre of the
ornell University School of Busi-
ess and Public Administration
ill lead a discussion on the poli-
cal aspects of administration at
30 p.m. today in the West Con-
rence Rm. of the Rackham Bldg.
Page Hunt Cluej
TODAY'S
CLUE
"A parking meter I
can see from beneath
my shady lea."
- 235 S. State
S-----J

By JOYCE FICKIES
AD-X2, the storage battery pre-
servative which has caused a po-
litical upheaval in the national
Bureau of Standards, appears to
be an unknown in Ann Arbor.
Neither a University authority
on batteries nor local gas station
attendants can report anything
of significance on the product.
* * *
TESTING of the preservative,
which manufacturers claim will
lengthen the life of a storage bat-
tery, was brought to light 10 days
ago in the forced resignation of
Bureau director Allen V. Astin
and, more recently, in threats of
a mass resignation of some 30
Bureau scientists in sympathy with
the director.
Secretary of Commerce Sin-
clair Weeks had charged Astin
with being "not sufficiently ob-
jective" and lacking a "business
point of view" when the Bureau
repeatedly refused to endorse
the product.
Prof. Leo L. Carrick of the chem-
ical engineering department re-
WHO WILL BE
EVERY GROUP CAN ENTER-
ASK CAMPUS REP
Robert Apple
2006 Washtenow Tele. 3-8508

ported that "next to nothing" has
been done in testing battery pre-
servatives at the University
"You've really got to ask the
man who uses one" to find out how
effective such products are, he
noted.
But users are hard to find in
Ann Arbor. A random check of
service stations in town showed
that only one attendant-and a
not very enthusiastic one, at that
-had ever used that type of pro-
duct.

Law School
Extols Cook
Founder's Day, an event honor-
ing the late William W. Cook who
donated the University Law Quad-
rangle will be celebrated by the
Law School tomorrow.
Charles E. Clark, judge of the
U.S. Court of Appeals will discuss
"The Illimitable Freedom of the
Human Mind" as the major event
of the day at a dinner to be held
in the Lawyers Club.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

THAT HIEAD
DESERVES A ROOF
OVER IT-OR
he who
hesitates
sleeps in
/' the station
Once a Smart Sophomore named Herman
trekked to a Big City for a Big Weekend. So
did thousands of other People. (Big conven-
tion in town.) Thus, arriving at the hotel of
his Choice, Herman found a Line stretching
from here to There up to the Room Clerk.
He was dismayed to hear the clerk bellow to
Number One Man in Line: "only ten rooms
left." Herman counted the Heads in line.
Thirty heads.
Grey cells seething, our Hero detached
himself from the Group and scurried to the
Western Union desk across the lobby. "I
want to send a Fast Telegram to the room
clerk,", he said. "Where?" queried the Girl.
"That one, right there," said he, pointing.
The Girl nodded .. .
Two hours later, refreshed by a Lavish
Dinner, Herman again ambled into the
Lobby. No crowd. Confidently he confronted
the Man Behind the Register. "You have a
room for me," he said, "I wired ahead for
a reservation . ."
A veryNice Room it was, too.
Lining up reservations is an easy Trick for
Telegrams . . . and one they do well. They
are equally efficient at tapping the Resources
of a Reluctant Parent, setting up a Mean-
ingful Meeting, flashing Good News about
Grades, or saying Something Nice to Some-
one Nifty. For any-type Communique, your
words Mean More by Western Union.
122 Huron Street, E.
Telephone 3-4221
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

4

1
1

4

a

m

BOOK
SALE
SLATE R'S
336 S. State St.

I
II
II
'I
L

Special For
Thursday Only
AMMIDENT
TOOTH PASTE
2 for $1.00

Marshall's Treasi

MARSHALL'S DRUG
- -----

... and for your safety /
with easier action, too!
j: +

CAN YOU "take it" 6 days a week? For 52 weeks? Can
you meet the high standards required to be an Avia-
tion Cadet? If you can-then here's a man-size oppor-
tunity! An opportunity to serve your country and
build a personal career that will fit you for responsible
positions both in military and commercial aviation.
It won't be easy! Training discipline for Aviation
Cadets is rigid. You'll work hard, study hard, play
hard-especially for the first few weeks. But when it's
over, you'll be a pro-with a career ahead of you that
will take you as far as you want to go. You graduate
as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Air Force, with pay of
$5,300.00 a year. And this is only the beginning-

your opportunities for advancement are unlimited.
ARE YOU ELIGIBLE?
To qualify as an Aviation Cadet, you must have com-
pleted at least two years of college. This is a minimum
requirement-it's best if you stay in school and gradu-
ate. In addition, you must be between 19 and 261/
years, unmarried, and in good physical condition.
YOU CAN CHOOSE BETWEEN
PILOT OR AIRCRAFT OBSERVER
If you choose to be an Aircraft Observer, your train-
ing will be in Navigation, Bombardment, Radar
Operation or Aircraft Performance Engineering.

New Aviation Cadet Training Classes Begin Every Few Weeks!
HERE'S WHAT TO DO:

Chevrolet's improved Velvet-Pressure Jumbo-Drum Brakes give
maximum stopping power with maximum ease of application

1. Take a transcript of your college credits and a copy
of your birth certificate to your nearest Air Force
Base or Recruiting Station. Fill out the application
they give you.
2. If application is accepted, the Air Force will arrange
for you to take a physical examination.

3. Next, you will be given a written and manual apti-
tude test.
4. If you pass your physical and other tests, you will
be scheduled for an Aviation Cadet Training Class.
The Selective Service Act allows you a four-month
deferment while waiting class assignment.

}i

Chevrolet owners have long been con-
vinced that they have the safest as well
as the largest brakes on any low-priced
car. And that is even more true in 1953.
This year you will find much smoother,
more responsive brake action . . . up to

shield and all windows of sedans and
coupes, extra-easy Power Steering* and
many other important safety factors, and
you'll understand why owners rate the
new Chevrolet tops.
Come in; see and drive this thrillingly

11/ A') A fl# D hi"AA10vo flav0II!-!& .... - r uww A:. .__n.... wYA -o:.. %QfPii~NM[1}EP~

0

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