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April 15, 1953 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1953-04-15

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PAGE SE!

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 1953

PAGE SIX WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 1953

MICHIGANDERS' BIG CATCH-Among the University students who journeyed to Florida for
spring vacation were Jim Bauer, '54A, Jack Schaupp, '55, Dick Zimmerman, '56, Doug Cutler,
'56, Ken Cutler, '54BAd, who display the fish they caught deep sea fishing last Wednesday. The
41 lb. Wahoo, caught by Bauer, won a citation for being the largest fish caught out of Fort Lau-
derdale that day.
'MADAME BAUT TERFLY':
College Talent To Give Puccini Opera

Dean's Talk
Contrasting t h e "looking
generation" of today with the
"lost generation" of youth in
the 1920's, Dean of Women De-
borah Bacon expressed her
confidence in young people of
today in a talk before the
Grand Rapids University ofj
Michigan Alumni Club.
The youth of the 1920's, she
said, "sat around dreaming of
a utopia," while young people
of today are "working for it
down at a political party head-
quarters or out ringing door-
bells."
Concluding that although
"this looking generation is too
practical, too shrewd and
knows too many tricks of the
trade without knowing the
trade," she admonished her
audience not to "pity the
young, they can take care of
themselves."
Top Educator
Will Address
Honor Group
A man who is one of the nation's
top educators, one of the Univer-
sity's most distinguished alumni
and. also an erstwhile Gargoyle
editor will present the annual Phi
Beta Kappa address Monday at
the honorary banquet.
Lyman Bryson, who will speak
on "The American Scholar, 1953,"
is all these things and more, ac-
cording to Prof. Robert F. Angell
of the sociology department, pres-
ident of the local Phi Beta Kappa
chapter.
A COLUMBIA Teacher's College
professor since 1935, Bryson has
been in charge of the Columbia
Broadcasting System's educational
programs since 1938.
He initiated and still directs
the "Invitation to Learning" ser-
ies which has been broadcast
continually for the last 13 years.
Bryson is also the author of
numerous books, the last two of
which are "The Next America"
and "Facing the Future's Risks."
His Gargoyle experience ended
with his graduation from the Uni-
versity, and election to Phi Beta
Kappa in 1910. Bryson was an as-
sistant professor of rhetoric and
journalism here from 1913 to 1917.
During and after World War I,
he spent ten years working for the
International Red Cross.
Talk To Be Given
On Administration
Political aspects of administra-
tion will be discussed at a public
meeting of the American Society
for Public Administration at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow in the West Con-
ference Rm. of the Rackham Bldg.
Leading the discussion will be
Prof.'Wallace S. Sayre, professor
of administration at the Cornell
University School of Business and
Public Administration.
Co-author of "Charter Revision
for the City of New York" and
"Education and Civil Service in
New York City," Prof. Sayre is a
consulting editor of the New York
Legislative Service.

By ELSIE KUFFLER
Two self-pronounced child pro-
digies are going to attempt to
prove that their artistic talents
have withstood the test of time.
John Goodyear, Grad., and,
Jamie Ross, Grad., will present a
two man student art exhibit at 8

Retailers To Hold
Conference at 'U'
Michigan retailers and clothiers
will meet at the University today
and tomorrow for the seventh an-
nual combined Merchandising
Conference and Clothiers' Clinic.
Today's conference will meet in
the Rackham Building, while the
clinic will be held tomorrow in
the Business Administration Bldg.

p.m. today on the mezzanine of
the Rackham Bldg. Sponsored b'y
Generation magazine, the exhibit
will continue through April 25.
* *-*
WHILE THIS exhibit consti-
tutes a retrospective show for
Ross, including some drawings
produced when four years old,
most of Goodyear's works will be
quite recent. The show will con-
sist of about 40 oil paintings, in-
terspersed with watercolors and
drawings.
Both artists are "non non-
objective," but they differ enor-
mously in techniques and choice
of object. In line with an out-
going, impulsive personality,
Ross favors rigid geometrical de-
signs of landscapes, emboldened
by the use of strong colors.

Goodyear's works, on the other
hand, are characterized by strange
shapes and figures whose actions
seem to hold back a mystery. The
iridescent quality of the colors and
extensive use of blues enhance the
aura of fantasy in his paintings.
* * *
GOODYEAR, who was art editor
of Generation last year and is cur-
rently a teaching fellow here,
studied with Prof. Chet LaMore
and the late Prof. Carlos Lopez of
the art school.
Among artist Ross' accomplish-
ments are the stage sets for the
Inter-Arts Union productions and
showings in the Michigan Artists
Show and Arts Theater Club. A
native of Ann Arbor, Ross, who
studied under Richard Wilt, in

the art school, predicts the great-
est art of the future will come from
the midwest.
Both artists will be on hand to-
day at Rackham to answer ques-
tions and discuss their works.
Sawyer To Speak
On Atomic Energy
Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
School of Graduate Studies will
address a meeting today of the
Industrial Executives' Club of Sag-
inaw there.
Speaking on behalf of the Mich-
igan Memorial-Phoenix Project,
he will discuss "Economic and So-
cial Aspects of Atomic Energy."

4

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BOOK
SALE
SLATE R'S
336 S. State St.

HELP WANTED
EARN $600 to $1500 this SUMMER. You select the amount you
want to earn. In any event we will guarantee you $600 and show
you how you can earn far more with a MARSHALL FIELD OWNED
organization. Openings for college men and women to assist the
director of CHILDCRAFT work in Michigan. Complete training
given. Ask for Mr. Shepard, third floor, Michigan Union, Wednes-
day, April 15th, 1:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.

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CHILD PRODIGIES SHOW WORK:
Generation To Sponsor Two-Student Art Show

I

Seniors .

With a cast of 40 and a re-
vamped English translation by
Josef Blatt, opera director of the
music school, the music school-
speech department production of
Puccini's "Madame Butterfly" will
open at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Tap-
pan Junior High School auditor-
ium.
Performances will also be held
Friday, Monday and Tuesday. The
school is located at the corner of
Washtenaw and Stadium Blvd.

STAGE DIRECTOR for the op-
era, Prof. Valentine B. Windt of
the speech department, will be
assisted by Nafe Katter, Grad.
Blatt's assistants are Mary Hutch-
ins, '54SM, Joyce Noh, '55SM, and
Richmond McCluer, Grad.
Costumes for the tragic opera
set in Japan were supervised by
Lloyd Evans, '54SM. Charles
Hoefler, Grad., designed the sets.
The five major roles are double-
cast with Dolores Lowry, '53SM,

'Quick' Publication Will Cease;
Slated To Combine with 'Look'

playing Madame Butterfly tomor-
row, Friday and Tuesday, and Joan
Rossi taking the part in Monday's
performance.
Miriam Broderick, '53SM, will
play the role of Suzoki on Mon-
day and Vivien Milan will sing
the other three performances.
Lieutenant Pinkerton will be
played by Jack Hamil, Grad. on
Monday and by Charles Green for
the remaining nights. Russell
Christopher, '53SM, will sing the
role of Sharpless Monday and
Robert Kearns, '54SM, is cast for
performances tomorrow, Friday
and Tuesday.
Robert McGrath, '54SM, will
play the role of Goro tomorr ow
and Monday with Thomas Evans,
'53SM, singing the part Friday
and Tuesday.
Tickets for the performances are
on sale for $1.50, $1.20 and 90
cents in the box office of Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater. Student
tickets are available at 75 cents.
Concrete Confab
Starts Second Day
Final sessions of the Fifth An-
nual Concrete Conference are be-
ing held at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
today in Kellogg Auditorium with
a noon luncheon being given in
Room 3-RS of the Union.

/
i
r ...as
.SHOES O

I

LAST WEEK
to- order
COMMENCEMENT
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SAMPLES AVAILABLE
FOR YOUR INSPECTION
Window open in Administration Bldg. Lobby
10-4:30 thru Friday

There's a trim, smart appearance to City
Club Shoes. It comes of well-formed lasts, perfect
styling, and the kind of shoe construction that insures
enduring good looks. Yes, and you'll like the

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price-it's just right, too.
$895 to $1495
DISTINCTION FOR MEN

i

AS
ADVERTISED canTrue*
IN Esquire "
Argosy "
Americon *
legion
Sport

-U -

11

Quick magazine, one of the first
pocket size news weeklies, will be
discontinued with the June first
issue.
The reason for this action was
given as lack of advertising vol-
ume although the magazine claims
a 1,300,000 circulation. Quick, be-
Sociology Talk
SlatedToday,
Population expert Prof. Philip
M. Hauser of the University of
Chicago will speak on "Training
Social Scientists for Research via
Research" at 4:10 p.m. today in
Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Besides being professor of so-
ciology and Associate Dean of
the University of Chicago's Divi-
sion of Social Sciences, Prof.
Hauser has held various govern-
mental posts.
He is currently the United States
representative on the Population
Commission of the United Nations
and has just returned from Burma
where he was making a UN popu-
lation study.
Managers Meet
Approximately 50 state pur-
chasing agents and city managers
will attend a Municipal Purchasing
Conference today in the East Con-
ference RM. of the Rackham Bldg.

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gun in July, 1949, will be merged
with Look magazine which is pub-
lished by the same company as
Quick.

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THE DISCONTINUATION of
Quick was cited by Prof. Karl F.
Zeisler of the journalism depart-
ment as showing that "a magazine
can not live on circulation alone."
Prof. D. C. Baker of the journal-
ism department sees Quick's dis-
continuation as no indication that
other magazines of its sort will
meet the same fate, although he
feels news reporting should tend
toward fuller explanation rather
than abbreviation.
Lawrence W. Prakken of the
journalism department and editor
and publisher of the Prakken pub-
lications expressed surprise at the
its circulation had been growing
discontinuation of Quick because
and "it seemed to fill a popularj
need in the publications world."
Group To Hear
AspiringPoets
Budding poets will have an op-
portunity to hear their poems read
and discussed at a meeting of the
Modern Poetry Club, Thursday,
April 23.
All students who are interested
in taking part in the meeting are
urged to turn in copies of their
work to Prof. Arthur Carr at 2605
Haven Hall, according to Lynn
Snyder, '53, chairman of the
group.
Sanford Named
To County Board
Thurlow Sanford, York Town-
ship Supervisor, was named chair-
man of the County Board of Sup-
ervisors yesterday by a 16-15 vote
of the board.
Henry F. Hicks of Ypsilanti
township was named vice-chair-
man of the board.

GRADUATE ENGINEERS1

A GROWING FIELD-

An invitation to

glo

places

in
AERONAUTICAL' MECHANICAL - ELECTRONIC
STRUCTURAL - PRODUCTION
ENGINEERING
A secure future, exceptional opportunities for
advancement, and an excellent starting salary await you at
FAIRCHILD, if you are one of the men we are looking for.
We have openings right now for qualified engineers and
designers in all phases of aircraft engineering; we need
top-notch men to help us in our long-range military
program: turning out the famous C-119 Flying Boxcars
and other projects for the U. S. Air Force.
FAmcmLDprovides paid vacations and liberal health and
'ife insurance coverage. We work a 5-dap, 40-hour week
as a base. Premium is paid when longer work week is
scheduled.
ENCINE AND AIRPLANE CORPORATION
H HAGERSTOWN. MARYLAND

Instrumentatio
Modern manufacturing trends at Du Pont bring
ever-increasing opportunities for technical men

this summer formal
won't wrinkle or stain !

Do you think of instrumentation as
applying only to work in electricity
and electronics?
Or would you also include prob-
lems in chemical processing, mate-
rials of construction and materials
handling, as well as application of
equipment - both mechanical and
hydraulic-for measurement and
control systems?
At Du Pont, instrumentation is
applied to widely diverse areas of
manufacturing operations. It calls for
many different technical back-
grounds. In a typical instrument
group there may be men whose formal
training has been in mechanical,
chemical, electrical or metallurgical
engineering, or in physics, etc.

Instrumentation is becoming more
and more important in the chemical
industry. In fact, many of today's
processes and products would not be
possible without modern measure-
ment and control systems. The trend
toward continuous processes means
challenging and constantly increas-
ing opportunities for instrumenta-
tion men.
Du Pont's instrument program in-
cludesresearch, development, design,
and supervising installation of proc-
ess control equipment. Some of the
work is done in the central Engineer-
ing Department at Wilmington.
However, most of the major plants
across the country now have their
own organized instrument groups.

Paul D. Kohl (left), B.S. in M.E., Purdue'46,
checks the assembly of an experimental control
instrument.
So you may visualize the scope and
diversity of the work, here are ex-
amples of instrumentation recently
developed and designed by Du Pont
technical men:
1. A device to measure flow of approxi-
mately 30,000 lbs. per hour of gas at
more than 10,000 p.s.i. To give 1.2%
accuracy and be responsive to flow-
changes of five cycles per second.
2. A device to monitor continuously
1200 similar temperatures. Equipment
to record temperature and sound alarm
at a deviation of*C. from desired point.
3. An automatic control system to main-
tain a predetermined pressure-tempera-
ture relation in a large-batch autoclave
during spontaneous reaction between
two chemicals.
Thus it can be seen that Du Pont
instrumentationis limited to no single
avenue of engineering. Men with an
aptitude for the work get experience
in many phases of the Company's
technical activities-and an excellent
background for positions in manage-
ment and administration.
ASK FOR "Chemical Engineers at

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GENERATION MAGAZINE INVITES YOUTEI
TO SEE PAINTINGS BY

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