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April 14, 1953 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-14

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TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 1953

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FV

THE_..... .+: v T(v aN Bv ATTY
i _ _. . .

..A! E PIT

Two Teams Schedule,
Frosh Weekend Stunts
Women Begin Training for 'Whirled Series,'
To Be Held Saturday as Part of Annual Project
(C>--

With Frosh Weekend coming up
Friday and Saturday, both the
Maize and the Blue teams are
planning stunts and skits to at-
tract attention to their respec-
tive dances.
Members of the "Blue Team of
the Michigan League" opened
their spring training series before
vacation on the Diagonal. Warm-
ing up for the series, to be pre-
sented Saturday in the League
"Stadium" the women wore typi-
cal baseball outfits, complete with
sneakers and caps.
* * *
THE WARM-UP session began
with calisthenics on the library
steps. Led by publicity chairman
Barb Watson and stunt chairman
Marcia Nelson, the team went
through the exercises before be-
ginning their practice game.
While the Blue team "batted
the ball around," announcer
Bill Williams interviewed team
members as they took the
mound.
According to the team members,
Williams found that "the dance
was sure to be a hit." He was told
to tell the fellows that "even if

they'd struck out three times, try
again."
ENTITLED "Whirled Series,"
the dancewill be held from 9 p.m.
to midnight Saturday in the
Leagt' Ballroom.
Ted Smith and his orchestra
will play for this dance, which
is boy-bid.
Tickets, at $1.50 per couple, can
be purchased this week at the Un-
ion, the League and on the Diag-
onal.
To further publicize their dance,
Blue Team members celebrated
"Blue Monday" yesterday. Dressed
completely in blue, team members
sported baseball caps or blue bows
and pennants.
To complete the baseball atmos-
phere, the Burton Tower carillon
echoed to the strains of "Take
Me Out to the Ballgame." Many
members of the team also roller-
skated to class.
Using their baseball theme for
all phases of the dance, the Blue
team is hoping to carry off the
trophy awarded to the winning
team after Frosh Weekend each
year.

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
FROSH WEEKEND--Warming up for the "Whirled Series" are
JoAnn Niemann, Marg Smith and Graechen Becker, all members
of the Blue team stunts committee. The dance will be held from
9 p.m. to midnight Saturday in the League Ballroom.
Annual Sof tball Tournament
To Begin for House Teams

I

Riley's Capitol Market
Open every evening until 1 :00
Sunday until Midnight1

ENTERTAINING NEEDS
FOR EVERY PARTY OCCASION

With a cry of "play ball," com-
petition will begin tomorrow in
the annual all-campus women's
softball tournament, sponsored by
the Women's Athletic Association.
Fifty-two coed teams have been
entered in the competition, which
will be held on Palmer Field.
EACH TEAM entered will con-
sist of from 10 to 12 players, a
scorer and a base umpire. Instead
of the seven players as was form-
erly required on the field, this
year eight players will be needed
before a game becomes official.
In another rule change, there
will be two base umpires on the
field, with one woman covering
first base and the other calling
all plays at second base.
An official plate umpire will
make decisions at third base and
home plate and will have the pow-
er to overrule any decisions made
by the base umpires.
« s ..
IN HOUSES that have more
than one team, the same woman

may serve as base umpire for all
teams. She may also be base um-
pire for one team and a player
for another.
For the first time, the tour-
nament will be run in "A" and
"B" rounds, with teams losing
their first games participating
in the "B" bracket.
Each team will be allowed two
cancellations before being dropped
from the tournament. All cancel-
lations must be made by calling
Pat Texter, 2-3159, by 1 p.m. Mon-
day of the week the game is sched-
uled.
The schedule for this week is
as follows.
Tomorrow at 5:10 p.m.-Kappa
Alpha ThetalI vs. Jordan IV*;
Kleinsteuck 1 vs. Delta Gamma*;
Alpha Epsilon Phi I vs. Barbour
II*; Kappa Kappa Gamma II vs.
Delta Delta Delta*.
Thursday at 5:10 p.m.-Alpha
Delta Pi I vs. Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma I*; Jordan I vs. Alpha Chi
Omega II*; Alpha Delta Pi II vs.
Kappa Delta I.

Dance Class
Needs Coed
Participation
Large Group of Men
Lack Lesson Partners
For Weekly Sessions
Coeds are needed to attend the
League dance classes at 7:15 p.m.
tonight and tomorrow as dance
partners for 40 extra men attend-
ing the dance lessons.
Coeds are invited to join the
classes on either or both nights,
even though they have never be-
fore attended these League dance
sessions.
Classes will consist of a review
of the popular dance steps and a
brush-up on the samba, tango.
charleston and fox trot. This re-
view will enable women who have
not previously attended to join in
the class without difficulty.
Women taking part in the dance
classes are asked to sign up at the
door of the League Ballroom on
the second floor at the beginning
of each hour-long session.
Johnny Urbanic, former profes-
sional instructor, is in charge of
the dance classes.
Since classes are free to all co-
eds, Janet Gast, chairman of the
dance class committee, urges any
woman interested in learning new
dances and meeting new friends
to attend the classes.
Independence Day
To Be Celebrated
At Hil lelBuilding
A carnival and formal program
will highlight the Israeli Inde-
pendence Daycelebration on Sun-
day at the Hillel Building.
Booths sponsored by several
campus fraternities, dancing to
the music of Paul McDonough's
orchestra and free refreshments
will be featured at the carnival,
which will be held from 7 to 10:30
p.m.
Prizes will be awarded at the
booths, and, in addition, several
prizes will be given away during
the evening.
These will include a wristwatch,
portable radio, cashmere sweater,
pen and pencil set, a $10 gift cer-
tificate from a local women's
clothing shop and a set of cuff
links and tie clasp.
Israeli students will conduct the
formal program, which will begin
at 3 p.m.
After a welcome by Prof. Pres-
ton Slosson of the history depart-
ment, there will be choir singing,
an Israeli dance exhibition and a
skit relating to Israeli independ-
ence.
In addition, a memorial will be
presented to the International
Center.
Admission to the entire event is
free, and everyone is invited to
attend.
The affair is being jointly spon-
sored by the Hillel foundation,
IZFA, campus Israeli students and
Ann Arbor residents.
EUROPE BOUND?
If so, you will be interested in the
CITROEN overseas delivery plan
the easy, economical, con-
venient way to see the real Europe
-- by private car. The Citroen,
France's most popular car, can be
purchased in the U. S. for overseas
delivery, and then resold in Europe
at the end of your trip. Request
your illustrated brochure, which
will be sent to you by our N. Y.

office, by sending a card to Box I
2151 University Station, Ann Arbor. I

By PAT TEXTER
One of the first major symphony
orchestras to include women in.its
ranks was the Philadelphia Orch-
estra, which will be heard in Hill
Auditorium in the six concerts of
the sixteenth annual May Festi-
val April 30 through May 3rd.
The first woman musician to be
employed by the orchestra was
Edna Phillips, who is well known
to Ann Arbor audiences. She ap-
peared with the group as harpist
from 1930 to 1946.
Since the time when Miss
Phillips joined the group, Eugene
Ormandy has included at least
four or five women players in
the orchestra each year. Among
these are Marilyn Costello, Mar-
cella De Gray, Elsa Hilger, Lois
Putlitz and Veda Reynolds.
Marilyn Costello, who occupies
the position of solo harpist, has
seen service with several orches-
tras. Included in her performances
are a season with the Cleveland
Orchestra and an engagement with
Erno Rapee at Radio City Music
Hall.
Miss Costello looks back at her
early musical efforts as the more
creative period of her life. Since
then most of her time has been
spent learning the skills needed as
a harpist.
It was while she was in high
school that she became inter-
ested in the harp, winning a na-
tional high school award. At the
suggestion of her teacher in
Cleveland, she went East to
study with the celebrated Carlos
Salzedo.
Marcella De Gray, the Orches-
tra's second harpist, is one of its
newest members. After graduation
from high school in Philadelphia,
she attended Temple University
f or two years.
Transferring to the Juilliard In-
stitute in New York on a scholar-
ship, which included training on
her chosen instrument, she was
able to study with Marcel Grand-
jany. After four seasons with the
Metropolitan Opera Orchestra
from 1948 to 1952, she went to
Philadelphia.
The first woman celist in any
major orchestra was Elsa Hilger,

I

Seniors..

who shares the first desk of the
cello section. At the time she
was in engaged in 1935, she was
the orchestra's first woman
musician, with the exception of
harpists.
Beginning her studies at the
age of nine in Vienna, she came
to America in 1922. with her two
sisters. The wife of a Philadelphia
dentist, she occupies the same seat
in the orchestra as that.held by
her father-in-law in 1901.
Lois Putlitz, who doubles and
sometimes triples on the violin,
piano and celsta, has also been
with the Philadelphia Orchestra
for more than a decade.
Born in Omaha, Neb., she
played as a child with the Holly-
wood Bowl Orchestra. Since that
time she has studied with Carl
Flesch and Efrem Zimbalist,

along with spending several sum-
mers in Europe.
Veda Reynolds, a member of the
first violin section, joined the or-
chestra in 1943. Her start toward
a musical career came, about as a
'result of a family musical back-
ground, as her father was con-
certmaster of the Denver Sym-
phony Orchestra.

*LAST WEEK
to order
COMMENCEMENT
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SAMPLES AVAILABLE
FOR YOUR INSPECTION
Window open in Administration Bldg. Lobby
10-4:30 thru Friday

ONE OF THE FIRST:
Women Musicians Regularly Included
By Ormandy in Philadelphia Orchestra

Broadcast
Four candidates for the of-
fices of president and vice-
president of the Assembly As-
sociation Executive Board will
present a half-hour program
over WEQN at 7:30 p.m. to-
night. Voting for the offices
will be held at the Board of
Representatives meeting at 4
p.m. tomorrow.

i
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LANGUAGE BOOKS 5c each
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