100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 02, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1953

________________________________________________________________________________ U

womm

Athletes Win Honors

-Daily-Don Campbell
YOST AWARD DINNER-Don Hurst and Ray Maugh chat with
Mrs. Fielding S. Yost at last night's dinner honoring 14 recipients
of the annual Yost Honor Awards.
Yost Honor Awards Go
To Fourteen Lettermen

Fourteen lettermen received the
coveted Yost Honor Awards for
athletes excelling in scholarship
at a dinner last night in the Union.
On hand to present the awards'
was Mrs. Fielding S. Yost, widow
of the famed Michigan coach.
WINNERS of the award include:,
John Chase, '54, swimming;
George Dutter, '54BAd., foot-
ball; Don. Hurst, '53Ed., gym-
nastics; Wally Jeffries, '53,
swimming; Miles Lee, '54, wrest-
Senior Lists,
Name Cards
On SaleToday
Seniors who want to immortal-
ize their years at the University}
will have an opportunity to buy
booklets, containing lists of their;
classmates, from 10 a.m. until 4:30
p.m. from today through April 17.
at the Acministration Bldg.
At the same time, they will be
able to order commencement an-
nouncements and personal cards.
Prices for the booklets range
according to the type of cover.
The booklet for non-profession-
al schools may be purchased for
60, 40 or 30 cents.
Law, dentistry and medical,
school booklets vary from 70 cents
to 50 or 35 cents. The graduate
school booklet is available at 85,
65 or 50 cents.
Commencement announcements,
costing 10 cents each, and per-
sonal cards, at $2.50 for the first
100 and $1.50 for each additional
100, are also being sold at the
booth.
Anthropologist
Gives Lecture
Mechanisms of group or ethnic
assimilation were enumerated yes-
terday to the anthropology club
by Prof. Wilhelm E. Miihlmann of
the sociology department of the
University of Mainz, Germany.
According to Prof. Miihlmann
primitive groups do not accept
new members without a formal
ceremony. This ceremony may in-
clude anything from formal adop-
tion of the individual or group, to
forceful incorporation into the
tribe.
As an example, he cited the Iro-
quois Indians who took prisoners
of other tribes and incorporated
them into their own group.
Much ethnical assimilation is
carried on through intermarriage
which is a forced practice among
many groups, Prof. Miihlmann
said.

ling; Ronald Martinson, '53E,
hockey, and Roger Maugh, '54E,
track.
Others honored were Milt Mead,
'54, track and basketball; Wayne
Melchiori, '53Ed., football; Bern-
hardt Pederson, '53E, football;
Joe Scandura, '53Ec., wrestling;
Thad Stanford, '54, footb'all; Dave
Tinkham, '53BAd., football, and
Robert Timm, '53E, football.
Hurst, Jeffries, Pederson and
Scandura received similar awards
last year.
Dean of Students Erich A.
Walter noted yesterday that of
the 54 candidates who applied
for Yost Awards, only nine have
scholastic averages of less than
2.5, and 11 have averages of 3.0
or better.
Lowest scholastic average among
the winners is 2.8, and the high-
est is 3.4.
"These figures are particularly
important in light of comment
which is often heard that extra-
curricular activities which are
time-consuming and of a mean-
ingful character must obviously be
accompanied by mediocre schol-
arship records," Dean Walter com-
mented.
Lights Out
Classes meeting in the Busi-
ness Administration Bldg., An.
gell Hall and other nearby
buildings at 9:15 a.m. yesterday
were rudely interrupted when
room lights went off "on sched-
ule."
Electricity was turned off to
facilitate a repair in the Uni-
versity power plant, Plant De-
partment head Walter Roth
said yesterday. "The break in
power was quite anticipated
and lasted less than 10 min-
utes," Roth said.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Action Begun
On Obscene
Publications
Washtenaw county newsstands
will soon be hit by a countywide
campaign against obscene litera-
ture, Prosecutor Edmond F. De-
Vine revealed yesterday.
DeVine said the campaign is
the beginning of an action to keep
obsceneumagazines and pocket no-
vels out of the hands of minors
in the county.
* * *
A LIST, containing the names
of publicationos banned by the
Detroit police censorship bureau
.and others found obscene by
Washtenaw county law enforce-
ment agents, will be in the hands
of distributors and retail dealers
in a few days.
The prosecutor said removal
of the literature will be left to
the sellers who have promised
cooperation. However, if they
fail to comply, court action will
be started, DeVine added.
If an action is started against
a dealer, he said, it will be left to
a jury to determine whether the
literature is obscene.
The action to remove the pub-
lications from the newsstands
followed a recent county-wide sur-
vey to determine the extent of
sales of the obscene literature, De-'
Vine commented. "We are going to
do what we can to keep it out of
the county," he said.
'UT' Called Too
Commercial
Members of state trade associa-
tions accused the University of
being "too. commercial" in a State
House Ways and Means Commit-
tee meeting yesterday in Lansing.
The Union was specifically
mentioned by Anthony N. Pre-
ketes, Ann Arbor restauranteur
and head of the local Restaurant
Association. Preketes said "many
owners of local restaurants have
complained about the University's
competition."
In answer to Preketes' charges,
director of University relations,
Arthur L. Brandon, said, "The
Michigan Union is for its mem-
bers-alumni and students. Little
of its service is available to an
outsider, and only when the out-
sider is sponsored by a member."
' f
prove the Gabardine
style leadership of

Local

Gro n steps

To

71

MVake

Hawaii

A

19th

State

* * *

* * *

With a Senate vote on Hawaiian statehood expected this month,
the University Hawaiian Club has intensified its efforts to sell state-
hood for the island territory to students and local residents.
Paul Ng, '53, chairman of the club's statehood committee, reported
group members have spoken to three sororities, the Young Republican
Club, the University High School's class in modern social problems
and Wayne Memorial High School students since the semester's start.
* * * *
HAWAII WAS ANNEXED to the United States in 1898 by a joint
resolution of Congress and incorporated as a territory under the
Organic Act of 1900.
Since then, numerous Congressional committees have studied
repeated statehood requests by the Islanders. Favorable committee
and presidential recommendations have sent the bill to Congress
three times in the past but twice the House has passed it only to
have the bill die in the Senate.
Actually, however, suggestions that Hawaii be made a state go
as far back as 1849.
In May of that year, a Lowville, New York newspaper, the "North-
ern Journal," published a two-column editorial advocating annexa-
tion and statehood for the Hawaian Islands.
And a few years later at a post-election Democratic Party cele-
bration a toast was offered to "The Sandwich Islands-may they
soon be added to the galaxy of '
states."
Statehood supporters feel Ha- A
waii has satisfied all the- require-
mentsfor becoming a state and DA I LY
that it is unfair for Hawaiians to
be prevented from exercising the PHOTO
voting privileges of other Ameri-
can citizens. FEATURE
Recent objections to making
Hawaii a state, as outlined in a
1950 Senate committee report, were Story by
based on its great distance from MI KE WOLFF
the mainland, the racial composi-
tion of Hawaii's population and
charges of large Communist politi- Pictures Courtesy o
cal and economic power in the Hawaii Visitors Bureau
Territory.,I

SENATE TO VOTE SOON:

i

Up Dive

9

STUDENTS TAKE A BREAK FROM CLASSES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII

t

i

THE HONOLULU CITY HALL

TYPICAL ISLAND SCHOOL OFFERS GOOD RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

i
I
i
' it
i jw

at
.la Caja

I

for the best
$PAGHETT I
and RAVIOLI
in town.
Ia C~
122 W. Washington
BEER 0 WINE SANDWICHES

_D"-
l

VULCANS TRAINS
Ticket Holders-You MUST
pick up your Tickets Today
or Tomorrow

Administration Bldg.

1-4:30 P.M.

r1
Ya

r

.,s . . . ( ' ..; .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan