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March 28, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-28

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PAGE SIX

THE MIMIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MATCH 28, 1953

THE aMTCTTTVilTV.A1 fLA1L1

SATURflAY, MARCH 28, 1953

NO BEARDS OR TV NECKLINES:
Recorder Takes Spotlight at Festival

* * ,

S * *

* * *

An audience will listen to tape
recordings of poetry for the first
time in the history of the Inter-
Arts Festival when Generation
gives its program at 2 p.m. today
in the Round-Up Rm. of the
League.
The idea of putting em-
phasis 'on the poetry itself instead
of the actual person, is not a new
concept, but one that has existed
since the time of the ancients, ac-
cording to Donald Hope, Grad.,
who arranged the program.
"THERE ARE many ways to
read a poem and the reading can
be illuminated by the personality
of the poet," Hope said. To avoid
this and the many affectations
that people see, such as tennis
shoes, a beard or a television type
neckline, Generation decided to
use tape recordings of students
reading their own poetry.
"By using a tape recorder, re-
cordings can be made over and
over again until the best read-
ing is obtained," Hope said.
Students who have made record-
ings for the program are Dick
Laing, Grad; Herb Mandel, Grad;
Betty Ehlers, '55; Joseph Greene,
Grad.; Anne Stevenson, '54, and
Hope.
An informal discussion will fol-
low the program and the record-
ing can easily be played back if
the audience wants to discuss any
particular parts of a poem. Mime-
ographed copies of the poems will
be handed out to the audience be-
fore the readings.
A TRIPLE BILL, featuring a
one-act play written by Robert
Rice, '54, is scheduled at 8 p.m.
today in Schorling Auditorium,
University High School. Mary
Forsyth and Gene Tolfree, '55 are
cast as leads of the play which
depicts the life of F. Scott Fitz-
gerald.
Following the play will be an
opera, 'Adam and Eve," written
by Karl Magnuson, '55SM, and
staring Joan St. Denis, '54, David
Marray, '53SM and Russ Chris-
topher, '53SM.
A modern dance with choreog-
raphy done by Robin Squier, '54,
and staring Miss Squier and Hen-
rietta Hermelin, '55, will close the
program.
The fifth annual festival opened
last night with a program by mu-
sic school students, featuring a
cello solo by William Doppmann,
'56SM, and a piano sonata by Da-
vid Tice, '55SM.
High Schools
To Perform
In Festival
Approximately 1,500 junior and
senior high school students are as-
sembled at the University today
for a day-long Michigan School
Solo and Ensemble Festival under
the auspices of the Michigan
School Band and Orchestra As-
sociation, in cooperation with the
School of Music.
Representing some 200 cities
throughout the state, the young
musicians, winners of district fes-
tivals, will perform at Hill Audi-
toroum, Harris Hall, Ann Arbor
High, Burton Tower, University!
High, the League, the Union and
Anngell Hall Auditorium Audi-
toriums B, C and D.
Performances will begin at 8
a.m., and will be limited to sixj
minutes. Judges from the facul-
ties of the University and Mich-
igan State music schools, and band
directors from state junior and
senior high schools will rate the
young musicians.
Purpose of the Festival, accord-

ing to Prof. William D. Revelli,
of the music school and chairman
of the Festival, is to provide op-
portunity for the students to com-
pare their musical progress.

-Daily-Jeff Pemberton
DONALD HOPE TURNS THE DIALS FOR JASCHA KESSLER, POET TURNED RECORDING ARTIST
UNION REFERENDUM:
Revisions To A ffect Membership

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sec-
ond in a series of interpretive articles
dealing with the revised Union con-
stitution to be presented as a ref-
erendum to all male students in the
all campus elections Tuesday and
Wednesday.
By GENE HARTWIG
Beginning work this fall, the
Constitution Revisions Committee
of the Union Board of Directors
was charged with the responsi-
bility of bringing the constitution
Democratic
Candidates
State Views
(Continued from Page 1)
"While our great University has
provided notable contributions to
mankind in many departments,
there has been some tendency to
refuse to accept the challenge of
real service," he maintained.
ROBINSON blasted Lecture
Committee policy and pledged to a
group of Young Democrats, that he
would work for open meetings of
the Board.
He said if he were elected to
the Board, he would "report to
the people-in an open meeting
or out of it-what goes on."
He also indicated that he wouldj
favor public Regent-student dis-
cussions of driving ban regulations,
fraternity and sorority bias clauses,
women's hours and rules govern-
ing student residence in apart-
ments.
Turning to the problem of edu-
cation at an evening meeting Rob-
inson said, "We must begin to
plan now for buildings that will
be needed, and for rearing the
group of educators that will be
required."
"We must have people on the
Board who will not be too timid
to assert the interests of the Uni-
versity," he concluded.
Be Sure To Vote
Tuesday & Wednesday

up to date and completing the job
begun the previous year.
Appointed to work on the com-
mittee were Prof. Albert L. Clark,
jr., of the engineering college,
Dave Ponitz, Grad. and Sam Al-
fieri, '54A, chairman of the group.
THE FIRST important changes
undertaken by the committee
were in Article III dealing with
membership.
Here the original constitu-
tion, adopted in July 1942, had
provided for student, annual,
life, honorary, directors', sum-
mer school and special course
members.
In each case where the payment
of fees had been listed in the con-
stitution as necessary for mem-
bership, the provision has been
taken out of the new document
and will be put into the by-laws.
According to committee chair-
man Alfieri this is aimed at "mak-
ing the constitution more flexible."
* * *
UNDER THE previous constitu-
tion any change in the conditions
Expert Speaks
On Immaturity
Emotional immaturity was
blamed for marital difficulties by
Prof. Florence Hollis of the New
York School of Social Work, yes-
terday.
Speaking at a meeting of the
Social Work Institute, Prof. Hol-
lis said that such emotionally im-
mature individuals have failed
"to resolve parental ties and have
carried childhood rebellion into
adult life."
Discussing methods which a
caseworker should use in solving
marital problems, Prof. Hollis sug-
gested that he establish a basic
understanding of the problem and
attempt to build up the person's
trust so that he will take criti-
cism. The caseworker should then
make him aware of his behavior
and help him to find the solution
to his problem, she added.

of membership entailed the cum-'
bersome process of calling a spe-
cial meeting of the voters to ap-
prove the amendment. With the
new arrangement such changes
can be made simply by changing
the By-laws.
In the proposed constitution
the only stipulations as to stu-
dent, life and summer school
memberships are residence re-
quirements in the University.
All male full-time students both
graduate and undergraduate are
eligible to be members of the
Union while attending the Uni-
versity. Their membership termi-
nates with Commencement Day
of the current academic year.
In order to hold life member-
ship under the new constitution
it is necessary to have completed
eight semesters of full time work
at the University. Provisions for
students not completing eight
semesters' work will be made in
the By-laws.
Summer session members are
given membership in accordance
with the terms of the Union By-
laws. Their membership termi-
nates on August 31 of each year.
The classification of "special
course members" which had ap-
plied to individuals taking short
courses, extension courses and
night school work has been elimi-
nated in the new constitution.
Philippine 'U' Plan
To Be Aired on TV
Plans for setting up an Insti-
tute of Public Administration at
the University of the Philippines
by the University in cooperation
with the Mutual Security Agency
will be discussed on "Michigan Re-
port," the University's television
show, at 6 p.m. today over WWJ-
TV, Detroit.
Prof. Ferrel Heady, assistant di-
rector of the Institute of Public
Administration, will discuss the
plans with Prof. Ramon Portugal
and Prof. Jose Abueva, of the Phil-
ippine University, who are study-
ing at the Institute here.

New Group
Granted OK
By Big e
By VIRGINIA VOSS
The Big Ten Student Govern-
ment Association, 10 years in the
talking stage and a year and a
half in the making, has been final-
ly ratified, it was made public yes-
terday.
Set up to unify the programs
and activities of Big Ten student
governments, the organization is
separate from the National Stu-
dent Association of which the Uni-
versity is also a member.
*' * *
RATIFICATION of the five-
month old Big Ten constitution
was held up both by this University
and Michigan State College.
Biding its time until the dis-
pute over the Big Ten's rebuff
of State's athletic policies cooled
down, the East Lansing school's
All-College Student Government
delayed ratification until the
March 15 deadline.
Student Legislature here init-
ially refused to okay the consti-
tution because of a provision stat-
ing that the Big Ten student body
presidents would "have the power
to express Big Ten opinion on stu-
dent matters."
SL vice-president Bob Neary,
'54 BAd., explained that the provi-
sion was much too broad to be
workable. SL early this year rati-
fied the constitution with the stip-
ulation that the objectionable
clause be omitted.
Student governments of Iowa
and Purdue Universities took the
same stand, Neary said.
* * *
UNDER THE present, approved
constitution, Neary said he felt
the Big Ten Association was a
good plan. Operating by means of
a council composed of the 10
schools' student body presidents,
the association will hold a year-
ly conference at one of the mem-
ber campuses as its main func-
tion.
The school selected for the
conference site will serve as a
clearing house for Big Ten in-
formation services that year.
Purpose of the newest student
government group to take on func-
tioning status is to "jointly consid-
er, coordinate and integrate prob-
lems and activities common to the
Big Ten institutions . . . and to
foster more efficient student gov-
ernment throughout the Big Ten."
Rep. Meader
Will Address
Conference
Rep. George Meader of Ann Ar-
bor will speak on the "Present
Congress and Foreign Affairs" at
1:15 p.m. today at the second con-
gressional district conference of
the Council of Churches to be held
at the Baptist church.
Prof. Preston Slosson of the his-
tory department will open the
morning session with a talk, "Can
A Foreign Policy Be Christian."
The conference which is being
sponsored by the Council of
Churches and the United Church
Women will be attended by per-
sons from Jackson, Adrian, Monroe
and Ann Arbor.
Besides the two major addresses,
groups will meet from 9:30 a.m.
until 4 p.m, to discuss the Chris-

tan views of the world crisis. Rev.
DeWitt Baldwin, director of Lane
Hall, is chairman of the discus-
sion groups.

ENDS TONIGHT:

pringWeekend

Skit Night, which will be pre-
sented at 8:30 p.m. tonight in Hill
Auditorium, will ring down the
curtain of the first Spring Week-
end project.
The weekend, sponsored by the
Union and the Women's Athletic
Association, began yesterday with
the "Wolverun Derby," in which
25 cars, and drivers competed for
trophies offered by the central
committee.
A parade from the Union to the
race "track" on E. Washington
St., behind Health Service, initiat-
ed festivities.
Six groups will be competing to-
night with original skits for first
place honors in the Skit Night
show.
,All proceeds from the perform-
ance will be given to charity, with
the Union donating its share to
the national Damon Runyon- Can-
cer Fund, and the WAA giving its
half of the profits to the Alice
Crocker Lloyd Research Fund, a
branch of the Phoenix Project
dealing with cancer research.
The new Spring Weekend has
been planned to provide all-cam-
pus participation in a program to
be held on alternate years with
Michigras.
Betty Comstock of the WAA and
Steven Fuerth of the Union are
co-chairmen for the event.
* * *

"THEY'RE OFF AND RUNNING" IN THE DERBY WHICH
STARTED THE WEEKEND'S ACTIVITIES.

IN THE SIX SHOWS WHICH WILL BE PRESENTED, THE SKIT
NIGHT AUDIENCE WILL VIEW "TRAGEDY"...

... AND GORGEOUS"
MICHIGAN COEDS.

Be Sure
Tuesday &

To Vote
Wednesday

There Must Be
A
Reason!
Why do so many former employees return
to Michigan Bell Telephone Company?
There is a reason, and indeed a large number of reasons.
Where else will they find:
Excellent chance for promotion
Convenience to campus and shopping centers
Steady and high income
Modern and comfortable lounges and cafeteria

why you should have a
Checking Account in our bank

THE MEN BEHIND THE SCENES FINISH WORK ON PROPS FOR SKIT NIGHT PERFORMANCE

A checking account saves valuable
time . * . saves footsteps . .. waiting.
When you write a check in payment
of a bill you have done it the better
way . , . the easier way.
Besides you become a person who does
business the modern way .. .
So call at our bank. Talk to one of

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--m aam m a

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