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March 26, 1953 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-26

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PAGE SM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 1953

Y*

PAGE S1~ THURSDAY, MARCh ZG, 1953

I

SLOWIOAT TO NIIKE:
Beardsley To Study Village
. . , *

By ELSIE KUFFLER
A village with a name like a
typographical error will undergo
thorough observation by Prof.
Richard K. Beardsley of the an-
thropology department during the
coming year.
Under the auspices of the Uni-
versity's Center for Japanese Stud-
ies, Prof. Beardsley will continue
a community study of the village
of Niiike, started in 1950 by social
scientists connected with the Jap-
anese Center.
NOT ONLY anthropologists have
studied this community, 'but eco-
nomists, historians, political scien-
tists, and geographers as well.
Prof. Beardsley will gather to-
gether all the information so far
collected by these social scientists
and integrate it with his own
study to produce a cross-checked
account of the life and problems
of Japanese rice farmers.
Purpose of the community
study is to learn fa'ts which will
help in the understanding of
the Japanese as humans influ-
enced by a particular culture.
Besides seeking insight into hu-
man relations through study of
families and other groups, Prof.
Beardsley plans to analyze the
annual crop cycle and the cere-
monial round in order to illum-
inate the peasants' adjustment to
the environment and their views
of the nature of the world.
The study of the peasants' rela-
Rural Doctor
Shortage Told
In Health Talk.
The shortage of doctors in rural
areas was emphasized during the
opening session of the first Cit-
izens' Public Health Conference
yesterday.
Designed specifically to sound
out Michigan's public health needs
and coordinate ways of solving
them, the meeting is concerned
with obtaining more teamwork
among community organizations
such as school boards and public
health officials.
Attending the conference are
over 200 members of civic organ-
izations, unions, farm bureaus and
members of the State Legislature.
On the agenda for today is a con-
tinuation of discussion meetings,
and a presentation of findings at a
general session at 11:15 a.m.
The conference's closing address
will be given by Prof. Paul Bag-
well of Michigan State College at
1:30 p.m. today in the Public
Health Auditorium.

Social Work
'Confus ing,
--Greenwood
Even a social worker is con-
fused about the all-encompassing
field in which he works, Prof. Er-
nest Greenwood of the University
of Pittsburgh School of Social
Work said yesterday.
The reason for possible con-
fusion, he said, is that there is
such a great latitude between the
two main phases of the field-
clinical and case work.
SPEAKING BEFORE a group of
sociologists and social workers,
Greenwood said that when people
cannot relate themselves to others
satisfactorily, the social worker
sets into motion certain interper-
sonal processes.
The end result is the reestablish-
ment of ."normal" functions, he
said.

NIIKE-Shown above is the small rice farming village where
Prof. Richard K. Beardsley will spend a year observing the agri-
cultural, religious, and social customs of the farmers. The village
is located near the city of Okayama on the southwestern tip of
Japan.

* * * o
tions with the higher government
and his attitude toward national
questions will also aid in under-
standing his political feelings.
* * *
THE COMPLETE published
work will be the Center's first re-
port of a joint study of a com-
munity. It will round out excerpts
which have already appeared in
professional journals and in Oc-
casional Papers, one of the series
of magazines put out by the Cen-
ter for Japanese Studies.
The Center for Japanese Stud-
ies which is sponsoring the com-
munity study, since its start in
1947 has been a link between
the University and foreign coun-
tries.
Absentee Ballot
DeadlineSet
Students and faculty members
who wish to cast absentee ballots
in the April 6 Ann Arbor election
should have applications in by
2 p.m., April 4.
Applications for absentee bal-
lots can be made in person at the
City Hall, or by calling City Hall
2-6583 and having the ballots
mailed to them.
Personal signatures are neces-
-sary on each application. Absen-
tee voters may return the ballots
by mail any time prior to the clos-
ing of the polls on election day.

* * *
How the Japanese live, why they
live as they do, and the nature
of the changing forces in their
lives are all important to a com-
plete understanding of the people.
This community study is only one
of the projects carried on by the
Center, which has set up a large
field station in Okayama, in south-
western Japan for the purpose of
carrying on research.;
Panel To Hear
Hatcher Talk
President Harlan H. Hatcher
will take part in a panel discus-
sion today at the 58th annual
meeting of the North Central As-
sociation of Secondary Schools
and Colleges.
James B. Edmonson, dean em-
eritus of the education school, will
report on the Association's new
athletic regulations.
Also attending the conference
will be Laurence E. Vredevoe, di-
rector of the Bureau of School Ser-
vices, Harlan C. Koch, assistant
dean of the School of Graduate
Studies and Clyde Vroman, di-
rector'of admissions.

GAMING FROWNED ON:
Constitution Blocks Legalized Bingo

The social worker assists in-
dividuals in utilizing their en-
vironment. He also helps in pre-
venting problems as well as rem-
edying those which already ex-
ist.
"Social work is a collection of,
skills which the social worker em-;
ploys to enable individuals to over-1
come temporary breakdowns in1
social relationships," explained,
Greenwood.
AI
T TE PRACTICE of social work
should be harmonized with the'
theory of sociology, suggested the
sociologist._
Engineer Group
To Hear Mmdliii
Prof. R. D. Mindlin of Columbia
University will address seminars in
Engineering Mechanics and Ap-
plied Mathematics, 3:30 p.m. to-
day in Rm. 311 of West Engineer-
ing Bldg.
Prof. Mindlin will speak on 'The
Approximate Equations of Small
Vibrations of Elastic Bodies."
First Aid Course
To Be Offered
The Ann Arbor branch of the
American Red Cross will offer a!
course in first aid if fifteen stu-
dents wish to attend.
Interested students may call the
Red Cross office 2-5546.

By HARRY LUNN
A constitutional restriction
stands in the way of legalized
bingo games and raffles in Wash-
tenaw County and other state com-
munities.
Included in the state's consti-
tution is a provision against lot-
teries, which have been defined
through court interpretation as
Survey ioShows
Wide Range
In. Definition
(Continued from Page 1)
But representatives of the ma-
jority of the people who are re-
strained by "constitutions, bills
of rights, and preambles" from
infringing on minority rights
was his view of democracy to-
day.
A still different approach was
given by a sophomore who said
democracy, although associated
with rights we enjoy in the United
States, meant the exercise of cer-
tain responsibilities before it could
truly exist.
He said these involved the sac-
rifice of privileges to expediency
under "the working premise that
the able must rule."
Other opinions included "a bal-
anced government" with no expla-
nation to its meaning, the phrase
"of the people, by the people, and
for the people," and a system to
allow "people to compete freely
for wealth."
Slosson To Speak
On Human Rights
Prof. Preston Slosson of the his-
tory department will give a talk
on human rights accompanying
the UN film "Of Human Rights"
to be shown at the International
Center at 8 p.m. today.
The meeting is being sponsored
by the Women's International
League and is open to the public.
-
t[

any gaming device involving
chance, prizes and payment.
* * *
A PROPOSAL by the local In-
ter-Organizational Committee to
legalize bingo and raffles when run
by charitable or fraternal groups
would not be legal because of this
prohibition, according to State
Rep. Lewis G. Christman of Ann
Arbor.
Made up of representatives
from county veterans groups,
lodges, unions and civic groups,
the Committee is seeking relief
from a recent crackdown by
Prosecutor Edmund F. Devine
on bingo games and raffles.
Running these games had pro-
vided a substantial amount of rev-
enue for the groups involved:
Prizes consisted mostly of mer-
chandise, according to committee
members.
A *! *
ENFORCEMENT of the state
laws regarding these forms of
gambling is left to local county
law agencies.
Oakland, Macomb, Alpena and
Washtenaw are the only coun-
ties out of more than 80 in the
state where the law is being
rigidly administered, Committee
chairman Frank Kildau report-
ed.
In surrounding areas bingo

games and raffles flourish, other
representatives attested.
One form of gambling legal in
the state is horse racing. A law
permitting racing was sanctioned
by the courts on grounds that bet-
ting on horses involved an element
of skill and thus could not be con-
sidered "chance," Rep. Christman
said.
Under terms of the law, a small
percentage of the pari mutuel
take goes to the state. This proviso
has resulted in substantial state
revenues.
Niagara Bus Trip
Reservations Due
Persons wishing to go on the
International Center - sponsored
trip to Niagara Falls should re-
serve places immediately at the
Center.
Scheduled for April 6-10, the trip
will be by bus and will feature
stopovers at Buffalo and Toronto
as well as Niagara.
All students are invited to travel
with the group. The cost, includ-
ing transportation and lodging, is
$20.

Work, Travel
Offered 'U'
Volunteers
Students who aren't afraid of
work can travel in the United
States, Europe, Japan, Alaska
and Mexico this summer with the
Friends Service Organization.
Barbara Grant, college secre-
tary for the Friends, is visiting
campus today and tomorro7 to
meet with students and discuss
possibilities of summer work pro-
jects. Appointments may be made
by calling Lane Hall.
PLANNED ON A completely vol-
unteer basis, the Friends conduct
service projects which include re-
construction in slums, work on In-
dian reservations, and planned
help for migrant workers.
The group also carries on in-
ternational relief and post war
construction projects in foreign
countries.
Since 1917 similar projects have
been conducted by volunteer work-
ers.
Miss Grant will be the guest at
the International Student tea from
4 to 6 p.m. today.

I

,4

a

4

4

Student Actors
Clear $400
The Student Players made a net
profit of $400 on their productions
of "Brigadoon" and "The Phila-
delphia Story" it was announced
at their recent meeting.
Officers for the fall semester
were also chosen at the meeting.
James E. Broadhead III,. '54, was
elected president; Jill Schiller,
'54Ed., will be vice-president and
publicity chairman; Henrietta
Harmelin, '55, was elected secre-
tary; Arno Schiewind, '53NR,
treasurer and Joan Aiken, mem-
ber-at-large. Marie D. Miller will
. continue as executive director.

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